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I have recently purchased a 1025R when I put it four wheel drive sometimes both front wheels will drive and other times only one of the wheels will drive.My dealer says this is normal, but it doesnt seem right to me. Are both front wheels suppost to drive when in four wheel drive mode ? If not then why do they both drive alot of the time in the same conditions ? Thanks for your help.
 

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If this is normal could you explain to me why if Im say pushing dirt and only one front wheel is driving and I back up a couple of feet and go forward then both front wheels will drive.Sometimes both wheels will drive when Im turning and other times they dont. It seems very strange that its so intermitten.Thanks again
 

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Sometimes both wheels will drive when Im turning and other times they dont. It seems very strange that its so intermitten.
You'll probably notice it more when turning than at other times. When turning, one wheel is spinning more than the other. (The outside tire has farther to travel then the inside tire.) The tractor's differential senses this but it doesn't know that you are trying to turn. It assumes that the difference in tire spin rates means that one wheel is slipping so it will apply power to the opposite wheel. But it doesn't transfer ALL power. It will apply in varying amounts until the "slipping" stops and the wheels are turning at the same rate again - usually when you straighten the machine out...

You'll notice it sometimes and not other times because of the different surfaces you might be on, how hard you are turning, how fast you are moving, etc... When the magic ratio of left wheel:right wheel "out of sync" is hit, the differential will kick in. If it isn't reached, the differential just lets things go.

(This is really a pretty crude explanation but... it would take pages to go through all of the possible scenarios.)
 

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Take a look at this video:

 

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If it's a new tractor and you think it's not right, call your dealer.
 

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I have recently purchased a 1025R when I put it four wheel drive sometimes both front wheels will drive and other times only one of the wheels will drive.My dealer says this is normal, but it doesnt seem right to me. Are both front wheels suppost to drive when in four wheel drive mode ? If not then why do they both drive alot of the time in the same conditions ? Thanks for your help.
What are you using to determine if one or both wheels are transmitting power?

Depending on tractive conditions, one or both tires can spin/slip. If one tire gets good traction it will not spin, but still provide power or pulling force, but only as much force as the other tire/wheel that is slipping, because of the differential.
 

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Take a look at this video:

I love that video. I first saw it a few years ago and I can honestly say I didn't truly understand a differential before watching it.
 

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If front wheels are "spinning" (slipping), ease off the FWD pedal and engege the rear traction lock. This will give you constant 3 wheel drive (straight ahead) when FWD is engaged. Of course, you can still run out of forward traction in some situations.

Like the traction lock, it's always good practice to disengage FWD when turning tight w/loaded bucket or don't really need it... like on solid pavement. Sometimes it requires touching the REV pedal to disengage FWD. After a while it becomes second nature to flick it in and out of FWD as needed such as plowing snow, etc...
 

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If this is normal could you explain to me why if Im say pushing dirt and only one front wheel is driving and I back up a couple of feet and go forward then both front wheels will drive.
The wheel will only slip when the force applied exceeds the available traction. If a front wheel slips it only means that the slipping side has less traction than the non-slipping side - since it is an open differential the side with less traction will spin. Unless the conditions are perfect you will not be able to get both front wheels to slip at the same time.
 

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You'll probably notice it more when turning than at other times. When turning, one wheel is spinning more than the other. (The outside tire has farther to travel then the inside tire.) The tractor's differential senses this but it doesn't know that you are trying to turn. It assumes that the difference in tire spin rates means that one wheel is slipping so it will apply power to the opposite wheel. But it doesn't transfer ALL power. It will apply in varying amounts until the "slipping" stops and the wheels are turning at the same rate again - usually when you straighten the machine out...

You'll notice it sometimes and not other times because of the different surfaces you might be on, how hard you are turning, how fast you are moving, etc... When the magic ratio of left wheel:right wheel "out of sync" is hit, the differential will kick in. If it isn't reached, the differential just lets things go.

(This is really a pretty crude explanation but... it would take pages to go through all of the possible scenarios.)
You are describing a limited slip or all-wheel drive system. The 1 series tractors do not have this. They have a full open front and a full open rear with a manual lock. When the rear manual lock is engaged it acts as a solid axle but leaves the front open. With open differentials, power is lost to the wheel that has no traction.

And with a true 4x4 system, the front and rear differentials are locked together. For one front wheel to slip, one rear wheel must also slip at the same rate. If you are noticing both front wheels slipping, then one or both rear wheels must also be slipping. If this is not the case, something is amiss.


Mr. Moose
 

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Maybe I can explain a little better what my tractor is doing. I put it in four wheel drive and lock the rear differential then try to push or pull something, when I run out of traction about 60% of the time all four wheels will spin the other 40% of the time only one wheel in the front will spin.When that happens all I have to do is back up a couple of feet then go forward and most of the time all four wheels will spin.This happens on dirt,mud,snow or concreat,and it doesnt matter how slow or fast Im going or if Im turning or going straight.I have talked to my dealer about it and he said only one wheel is soppost to spin , when I told him both of mine will spin sometimes he then said that was normal.I tried emailing John Deer and they said I would have to talk to my dealer about it.All I would like to know is if this is normal or do I have a problem with my tractor? Thank You for all your comments
 

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Maybe I can explain a little better what my tractor is doing. I put it in four wheel drive and lock the rear differential then try to push or pull something, when I run out of traction about 60% of the time all four wheels will spin the other 40% of the time only one wheel in the front will spin.When that happens all I have to do is back up a couple of feet then go forward and most of the time all four wheels will spin.This happens on dirt,mud,snow or concreat,and it doesnt matter how slow or fast Im going or if Im turning or going straight.I have talked to my dealer about it and he said only one wheel is soppost to spin , when I told him both of mine will spin sometimes he then said that was normal.I tried emailing John Deer and they said I would have to talk to my dealer about it.All I would like to know is if this is normal or do I have a problem with my tractor? Thank You for all your comments
This is NORMAL
 

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Maybe I can explain a little better what my tractor is doing. I put it in four wheel drive and lock the rear differential then try to push or pull something, when I run out of traction about 60% of the time all four wheels will spin the other 40% of the time only one wheel in the front will spin.When that happens all I have to do is back up a couple of feet then go forward and most of the time all four wheels will spin.This happens on dirt,mud,snow or concreat,and it doesnt matter how slow or fast Im going or if Im turning or going straight.I have talked to my dealer about it and he said only one wheel is soppost to spin , when I told him both of mine will spin sometimes he then said that was normal.I tried emailing John Deer and they said I would have to talk to my dealer about it.All I would like to know is if this is normal or do I have a problem with my tractor? Thank You for all your comments
Short answer is power is always delivered to the wheel with the least amount of traction. If both wheels have the same traction then both will spin. Listen to what others are telling you. It's normal, relax. Most likely your car does the same thing. Your just not staring at your cars drive wheels.
 

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AND...You don't have "4WD", even full size trucks don't-it's a sales ploy. The best you can ever get is 3WD with the rear diff activated. IF all the wheels where locked together for true "4WD" you couldn't turn since they would all be traveling at the same speed. Remember when you turn the outside wheels have to travel further:

Tirepathsinaturn.jpg




Your tractor is operating 100% normal, that is just the facts as many have explained to you.
 

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It's how a differential works. Re-watch the video and then Google "rear differential."


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
He could buy a horse , at times they slip the same as the tractor... guess that won't work. !
 

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All I would like to know is if this is normal or do I have a problem with my tractor?
That was clearly answered in the FIRST reply:
Short answer, this is normal. The differentials on the tractor are open to allow it to turn. You can temporarily lock the rear diff with the pedal but not the front.
 

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I'll go against the grain here and suggest that the OP's issue is being misunderstood. I picture the tractor up against a pile of stone or connected to a heavy load by a chain. I read that only one front wheel spins, that three wheels are not spinning and the OP's tractor is stationary (stuck) at the time. This doesn't seem normal to me.

Slipping at the front differential does not disconnect the rear drive gears. Even if one front wheel is slipping, the rear axle continues to be driven and at least one rear wheel should be spinning; two with diff lock engaged. If there is no forward movement of the tractor and neither rear wheel is spinning and everything is function properly, the tractor should stall.

If I was the OP, I would check air pressure in the rear tires. It is likely that one or both wheels are spinning inside the tires. On a normally functioning tractor, I cannot imagine anything else that would allow the front axle to be driven and the rear axle to appear as though it is not driven.
 

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I'll go against the grain here and suggest that the OP's issue is being misunderstood. I picture the tractor up against a pile of stone or connected to a heavy load by a chain. I read that only one front wheel spins, that three wheels are not spinning and the OP's tractor is stationary (stuck) at the time. This doesn't seem normal to me.

Slipping at the front differential does not disconnect the rear drive gears. Even if one front wheel is slipping, the rear axle continues to be driven and at least one rear wheel should be spinning; two with diff lock engaged. If there is no forward movement of the tractor and neither rear wheel is spinning and everything is function properly, the tractor should stall.

If I was the OP, I would check air pressure in the rear tires. It is likely that one or both wheels are spinning inside the tires. On a normally functioning tractor, I cannot imagine anything else that would allow the front axle to be driven and the rear axle to appear as though it is not driven.
Interesting take Ox...I sure didn't read the OP that way but maybe you are correct. This has been known to happen before:

http://www.greentractortalk.com/forums/sub-compact-utility-tractors-scut/17229-1026r-fwd-only-rear-slipping.html
 
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