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Discussion Starter #1
I'm not sure if that is the name, but it had a below ground drop release that empties the pipe.

So my contractor pt one in, put a stake next to it and wrapped a flex tie to the stake.

The second time I opened the faucet I must have applied a bit of side torque, the pipe broke off. Now the house water is turned off while I repair this.

Any suggestions on supporting this better?


Meanwhile is a 30' Grady White.
 

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They are generally called "yard hydrants". That was a poor installation to say the least.
 

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I think the appropriate action would be to find the guy that installed this, pull him out of his truck by the collar...... and........well, Kenny knows how this story goes!
:laugh:
 

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Bigger stake, deeper into the ground, proper clamps to hydrant.

Myself, I'd put a PT 4X4 behind it, dug in at least a foot deeper, possibly set in cement. But that is me.

And it looks like PVC supply. I don't know if that is code, but that is probably why it broke so easily. If it is a metal supply, for at least part of it near the hydrant, and deeper, you may not need a stake.

BTW, what is frost depth in your area. Your hydrant doesn't look like it's more than 12 inches down. Not good if the bottom, where the valve is freezes. Where I live, frost line is about 48 inches.

I'd do it differently. But I would check code first.

Just my 2 cents.
 

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Bigger stake, deeper into the ground, proper clamps to hydrant.

Myself, I'd put a PT 4X4 behind it, dug in at least a foot deeper, possibly set in cement. But that is me.

And it looks like PVC supply. I don't know if that is code, but that is probably why it broke so easily. If it is a metal supply, for at least part of it near the hydrant, and deeper, you may not need a stake.

BTW, what is frost depth in your area. Your hydrant doesn't look like it's more than 12 inches down. Not good if the bottom, where the valve is freezes. Where I live, frost line is about 48 inches.

I'd do it differently. But I would check code first.

Just my 2 cents.
Exactly!
A bottle lamb with brain damage could do a better install.
 

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I drove in a similar sized pipe and U bolted the 2 together in a couple spots..high & low.

I've done some others way different in a elaborate 5 gallon bucket .....bla bla bla

What a PITA to dig up when some turd backs into one.....Never again.

I'd use a few hose clamps ,u bolts or whatever.....I have one just like yours , recently repaired ...I need to finish that project or plan on doing it once again
 

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deeper ....deeper......usually the pipe is a minimum of 3' deep and the backfill around the pipe supports it....

if your going to put it that shallow it ill need extra support......also usually there is a brick or block under it so it is supported from the bottom......

its common in our area to see these inside of a 3' deep verticle 4 or 6" plastic pipe packed with sand and gravel flush with the ground and the elbow at the bottom sitting on a brick ..
 

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If a yard hydrant is installed correctly, they are self supporting. There is no need for any other type of support.
 

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I agree with what everyone else has said, but I would add this. Underground, around the base of the faucet, put about a square foot of crushed stone instead of just dirt. It will help the faucet drain better.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I thank you all for the replies. It gives me more to think about.

What I did to get the water back on the house is to put used brick under and around, then pour 3/4 minus over that, then fill with 3/4 minus, then used the bucket I once read about here. I'll finish with a strain relief attaching to the hose around the bucket in case I pull the hose.

Some u bolts is a great idea. Will get some tomorrow.

The depth is shallow as it only freezes for a few days here. I live a mile from the lower Columbia River, banana belt compared to what you northern guys put up with. The water line is above the electric line to the shop. Inspected and approved.

Now I can rinse my sprayer. I had just filled 40 gallons so I turned off the water and got my spraying done. Now to rinse.

Thanks again.


Meanwhile is a 30' Grady White.
 

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yep....your picture shows why you have to put a brick or block under the elbow...since the ground gets wet and muddy and provides no support for the pipe .....:bigthumb:
 

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My bucket solution was similar but underground.

Pipe store guys have and still do say.....

Don't T into top of line.... Go sideways a foot then elbow UP. WITH Threaded elboWs. Easier to dig up and repair.

This gives the hydrant 2 or 4 directions of travel that will "give" vs snapping off.

I use brass elbows and short sections of brass pipe off the pvc. In addition I try not to thread into a female pvc T as the potential to crack it is ...well a pita. Do whatever nessessary to attatch to pvc threaded connection

pvc male to brass or whatever metal female.

And Yes Put a brick under the whole mess of fittings to support hydrant.
 

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Cast the thing into quick-set concrete. One bag should suffice. You'll find if ever you need to break it up, a grinder with a masonry disk will obliterate it in an instant.
 

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Every hydrant I've put in I get a couple short pieces of angle iron (6" - 8" long) use small muffler clamps and clamp the angle irons to the down spout of the hydrant (at 90°) so they are in the ground by about 10".
 

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The other thing you need to do is start about 2 feet back along the supply pipe and install an underground shutoff valve with a valve box above it for the hydrant,
that way when you break it off the next time (note: WHEN, not IF), you have an easy way to shut it off until you can dig it up and fix it.

I also agree on the transition to metal pipe, then AT LEAST 3 90 degree turns with 6-8 inch sections of metal pipe between them before the hydrant connection,
this zig-zag gives better isolation to the plastic pipe and less chance to break it. (I've got 4 of these, and I've had to replace 2 of them because they were broken,
both of the replaced ones started out 100% PVC courtesy of the previous owner, since I've put in shut-off valves and the metal zig-zag, I haven't broken one yet - and
the other two were installed after I learned how to install them correctly and have never broken!)
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Tquarles, much wisdom.

I'll wait for the next break. Coho season is on, tuna coming any day. No time now.

Thanks for all the suggestions.

Meanwhile is a 30' Grady White.
 

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Since you put it that way. . .

Tquarles, much wisdom.

I'll wait for the next break. Coho season is on, tuna coming any day. No time now.

Thanks for all the suggestions.

Meanwhile is a 30' Grady White.
I'd say to hell with the pipe as well. Coho and tuna or messing with a pipe? No contest, call a plumber if necessary, lol.

Treefarmer
 

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I hunted for a photo so will need to take one next time I am at the farm (off for a little vacation for the 4th). Anyway I can describe it. I had to have mine very strong because I knew there was a good chance horses would scratch themselves on them so came up with a good solution. I installed a 4x4 post about 10" behind the hydrant with the post set into the ground about 3-4' deep sturdy with some quickrete to hold it in. Then installed a split ring hanger on the frost free hydrant pipe (eg. Lowes item # 301968 Model # AV301968) and a hanger base on the post (eg. Lowes Item # 301689 Model # AV301689). Then connect the hanger to the base with a length of all thread. Neighbors saw mine and all are doing it this way now. Very tough. Every time I go out to fill the troughs the hydrant lever is covered with horse hair and the hydrant doesnt budge. Also...I agree with those who said to install a box and a shutoff valve.
 

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Next time it breaks be prepared to replace the whole unit as that brand doesn't last more than a couple years if used much. Get a Woodford Iowa hydrant and never look back.
 
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