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I cleaned up my old GPI 12V pump that I used when I made Bio Diesel in the backyard. I got a new 55 gallon plastic drum and have the fuel stored in my shop on a HF furniture dolly. Easy enough to roll the fuel to the door, hook the electrical wires to the tractor battery and fill it up. Every 50 gals of fuel saves me $35 at the off road pump which is 70 cents cheaper than highway diesel.
 
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I cleaned up my old GPI 12V pump that I use to use when I made Bio Diesel in the backyard. I got a new 55 gallon plastic drum and have the fuel stored in my shop on a HF furniture dolly. Easy enough to roll the fuel to the door, hook the electrical wires to the tractor battery and fill it up. Every 50 gals of fuel saves me $35 at the off road pump which is 70 cents cheaper than highway diesel.
But how do you fill it?

For diesel I have it super easy - I was given a 150 gallon farm tank years ago. Since I heat with oil I have it partially filled each year for my tractor.

And yes....I verified with my fuel supplier that I am getting ultra low sulfer fuel in both tanks at the price of home heating fuel. That’s all they keep in stock in the summer which is when I get my annual delivery. Not that my old old tractor needs ultra low sulfur fuel.....

My only issue with this subject is my generator which is the only gasoline engine I have now. Those #### 5 gallon jugs.

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I pulled into a Safeway Grocery/Gas Station one day, and thought I'd try, leaving the cans in the bed of the truck.
I took off the caps, grabbed the gas nozzle, and began filling. The attendant quickly scolded me, and told me to put the cans on the ground.
To me, it makes no sense at all. Vehicles ARE grounded to the ground, via the rubber tires?
Maybe I should put a heavy rubber mat in the bed of my truck, but would that be enough "spark" prevention to please them? Doubtful.
For that reason, is why I think more and more of going diesel, and upgrading my machine.
 

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I pulled into a Safeway Grocery/Gas Station one day, and thought I'd try, leaving the cans in the bed of the truck.
I took off the caps, grabbed the gas nozzle, and began filling. The attendant quickly scolded me, and told me to put the cans on the ground.
To me, it makes no sense at all. Vehicles ARE grounded to the ground, via the rubber tires?
Maybe I should put a heavy rubber mat in the bed of my truck, but would that be enough "spark" prevention to please them? Doubtful.
For that reason, is why I think more and more of going diesel, and upgrading my machine.
How is a vehicle "grounded" through rubber? Last time I checked rubber was an insulator. :)
 
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I am using the same system as the OP of this thread. I love it.
I have just the right amount of Jugs to fill my truck bed so they cant tip over, and they fit on my fuel cart for the shop perfectly as well. It has been a great setup. I typically go through a set of batteries after 3 sets full tanks. Basically 36 of these 5-6 gal jugs will typically use up a set a batteries.

I specifically did the one green tank to let me know it is the last one.
So I always empty it last.
I load the card when returning from the fuel station with the green tank on the bottom, later migrating the empty tanks to the bottom shelf of the cart.

I have I-match hitches on all my machines, I do get a faster fill rate if I raise the 3pt to max height, and move the fuel jug to the top rail of the 3pt this reduces the amount of lift the pump is pumping against. Fills about twice as fast that way as to leaving the jug down on the cart. Works either way.

753883

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Got this off eBay and filled it yesterday. Don’t know how long it will last but so far so good.
 

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Got this off eBay and filled it yesterday. Don’t know how long it will last but so far so good.
I have the RoughNeck version of this tank. The only thing I've heard about the low-cost Ebay copies is the pumps aren't the best. But the pump is easily replaced when it fails. I've seen these sell for as low as $150.
 

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How is a vehicle "grounded" through rubber? Last time I checked rubber was an insulator. :)
Vehicles are insulated to the ground <--- That's what I meant to say
 
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How is a vehicle "grounded" through rubber? Last time I checked rubber was an insulator. :)
That is what one would think. Actually rubber in tires contains some carbon so it will be slightly conductive. From 4 Things About Tires You May Not Have Known at tires3.com

Static electricity can be a problem with tires. Static electricity and an inadequate electrical ground can be a real concern when you’re refueling, or when you’re sliding out of the car. Modern tire compounds feature less carbon black to cut rolling resistance and weight, but that also means a tire that’s less conductive for an electric ground between the vehicle and the road surface. The solution is an “antenna tread” in the tire’s surface – a thin, continuous strip of rubber that serves as an efficient conductor between the tire and pavement so the vehicle is always grounded.
One time I was riding in a vehicle whose tire manufacturer must have not gotten this memo. I got shocked a lot getting in and out.

Since this thread deals with safe fueling, this is appropriate. If the tires were true insulators, the explosions due to static buildup at gas stations would be countless.
 

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Got this off eBay and filled it yesterday. Don’t know how long it will last but so far so good.
How do you get it out of the truck when it’s full?
 

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I have the RoughNeck version of this tank. The only thing I've heard about the low-cost Ebay copies is the pumps aren't the best. But the pump is easily replaced when it fails. I've seen these sell for as low as $150.
Think mine was about $160. The gauge quit right away. Have to send a video to the seller. Don’t know how they will handle that. It’s not exactly replaceable. And can’t ship it back. Not a huge deal but be nice if it worked.
 

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How do you get it out of the truck when it’s full?
I just rolled it onto a pallet I made a solid floor on. Ratchet strapped it down and used forks to load pallet and all.
 
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I have the RoughNeck version of this tank. The only thing I've heard about the low-cost Ebay copies is the pumps aren't the best. But the pump is easily replaced when it fails. I've seen these sell for as low as $150.
Just out of curiosity where do you get a replacement pump?
 

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Just out of curiosity where do you get a replacement pump?
I bought a spare pump for mine from NorthernTool when they had a big sale on them. But those hand crank pumps are available from multiple places. You just need to be sure that those cheaper caddys do not use some weird Chinese threads. In some cases you may need an adapter collar.
 

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Are you tired of man handling Big Jugs / cans? As you age, do you find them harder to handle and just more difficult to keep in the upright, operating position? Do you find them a burden and a real pain in the backside? I have found some jugs I really like and strongly recommend. FUEL JUGS, of course, Diesel or Gasoline.

What better way to avoid lifting the Big Jugs than to be able to pump off the contents into your machine's fuel tank. I recently bought a Terra Pump sold by Sojitek and it works great. Here are the jugs which I have used for years and really like.

https://www.amazon.com/VP-Gallon-Square-Racing-Utility/dp/B00AVA2DJA/ref=sr_1_8?dchild=1&keywords=fuel+jug&qid=1589298817&s=automotive&sr=1-8

Nice features and benefits of the plastic fuel jugs include;
  • Designed to hold 5 gallons, they jugs will hold up to 6 gallons easily.
  • Large threaded filler cap is easy to handle and makes filling the jugs very easy.
  • You can stand at the gas station pump and fill these, instead of having to bend and hover over the smaller, lower containers.
  • The large opening pours easily without using the vent and avoids splashing and "splurshing" fuel.
  • A clear plastic threaded fill tube is available and comes with some of the fuel jugs.
  • If you don't want the plastic fill tube with the jugs, it can save you up to $5 per jug excluding the tube.
  • Jugs are available in red, yellow, purple, green, clear, white, pink, you name it.......they make it. (probably)
The Terra Pump, Sold by Sojitek
  • Bought it from Amazon for $59.99 and had to pay an additional $3.99 in shipping as it does not come from Amazon, but rather from another source.
  • This also made the delivery about 8 days, verses two days for the usual Amazon so if you are in a hurry, carefully check their ship dates before ordering as it could be out as far as 2 weeks from some shipments I have seen.
  • Uses 4 AA batteries but can operate on two, just for a much shorter period of time. 4 batteries are recommended.
  • Has an auto shut off feature which I found actually works when USED CORRECTLY.
  • Works on gasoline, diesel fuel and other fuels and liquids as well. Just don't mix and match with the same pump for best long term results.
  • The draw tube on the pump expands so it can work on a wide range of fuel containers.
  • Pumps 2.4 gallons per minute and it actually achieves this volume (even more, I checked it myself)
  • The Terra Pump comes with an adapter kit with 4 adapters, one of which DOES fit these large fuel jugs.
  • Please note, many of the cheaper or imitation / knock off pumps DO NOT include adapters and require you to order adapter rings separately, at a cost of up to an additional $19. Read the fine print carefully.
  • The cap which comes on the jugs won't accept the fuel pump, but the pump I ordered from the Amazon link does come with a cap which fits these fuel jugs.
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00SBZRELY/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o01_s01?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Using this Battery Powered Fuel Pump
  • You don't squeeze this nozzle to operate it like you do on a gas station pump. There is no handle to squeeze on this nozzle. You push the "power" or "pump" button on top of the pump to operate the pump.
  • This makes using this pump somewhat of a 2 hand operation for many.
  • You can clip the nozzle to many filler necks, depending upon the style, but not all.
  • The pump uses 4 AA batteries and the manufacturer claims it will provide power to pump 100 5 gallon cans of fuel or more.
  • I used this and it will pump over 5 gallons of fuel, very cleanly, quietly and uneventfully in about 2 minutes. In fact, it empties the fuel jugs surprisingly fast.
  • Very nice way to fill items without having to lift the fuel container and POUR or using a funnel.
  • Those who have a Mauser Cab on their tractor will find this is ideal for filling their tractor fuel tank as the cab makes using a funnel or even a large pour hose more difficult. Filling the John Deere diesel tank with this pump is a piece of cake. (y) (y)
Plastic Fuel Jugs, There are a number of Sources and Choices
  • I bought 4 of the VP Branded jugs for $112.98 which included free Prime Shipping from Amazon. It also included the clear plastic fill tubes, which I don't use.
  • These are available in a variety of colors and there are some round shaped and the square shaped like these jugs shown. I prefer the square shape as they are easier to secure in a trailer, etc. against another item or surface for transport.
  • I picked up 2 fro Menard's on Saturday for $18.99 each and also got an additional 11% rebate. They did not include the clear fill tubes which thread into the jugs cap, which is fine as I didn't want the clear pour tubes.
  • These fuel jugs are sold a number of places and the prices vary widely. True Value sells them at $29.99 each, and O'Reilly had them in the store at $37.99 each, but they don't show on their website for some reason.
  • Beware of the thin plastic imported jugs with crappy injection molding and thin seams. They are likely to disappoint you and possibly cause you a mess to clean up.
  • Most all of the caps are the same size, except on some of the knockoff imports and they were some oddball size. Otherwise, these caps all seem to swap between fuel jugs which is handy.
  • Basically, look for the label of quality (made in the USA)
  • Avoid the warning label (imported from China)
  • Note, the interesting label on these jugs, from the manufacturer. The manufacturer says these are not fuel containers as described by the EPA, etc and are do not meet the requirements of other fuel can standards. It's because of the large caps, vents, etc.
  • Actually, the things which make this fail to meet the EPA guidelines are largely the reasons why I prefer these fuel jugs.
  • Note, the jugs I got at Menards are also made in the USA, which is great to see....Texas, it appears..............(y)💪
Why not get a large single fuel cell, instead of a number of individual fuel jugs?
I purposely didn't want a large 35 to 55 gallon "fuel cell" or larger bulk storage tank for a number of reasons, including;
  • Our HOA restricts individual fuel storage tank sizes, but not the number of fuel jugs.
  • Home owners insurance also had limits and special requirements for bulk fuel storage tanks. I store all of my fuel in a detached building more than 100 feet from the house. I never put any fuel jugs, cans, etc. into the garage attached to the house.
  • Local rules require "spill containment walls" on bulk above ground fuel tanks.
  • I don't have an easy way to transport a fuel tank / cell which could weighs 250 to 500 pounds depending upon capacity as I don't have a pick up truck.
  • Fuel delivery charges a premium, plus my storage building is well off the driveway and road and I don't want a fuel truck driving across my yard.
  • I like the flexibility of being able to buy as little as 5 gallons or as much as 80 gallons of fuel depending upon the need and price. I went down last week and filled 12 of the gasoline fuel hugs when gas dropped to $1.20 per gallon. As of today, local gas prices are already back up to $1.88 for regular. That temporary price drop saved me about $50 in the purchase cost of that gasoline purchase.
Final Points to Consider about this Post
  • I use a lot of gasoline in the summer months mowing, on average 15 to 20 gallons per week. But I am also mowing as much as 10 to 12 hours per week. So my needs are different than many / most.
  • I use a lot of diesel fuel plowing snow, as much as 200 gallons per winter (not this winter, only about 22 gallons in total)
  • In the winter, I use very little gasoline and only keep 5 gallons of treated gasoline on hand for my Honda walk behind snow blower.
  • I like to have enough fuel on hand so if there is an emergency, I won't be forced to be in line early to get what I need. As an example, if we had a World Wide Pandemic.......and everything non essential was shut down. Sounds like the stuff of Science Fiction, doesn't it? (eyes rolling, head banging, etc.)
  • I always treat All gasoline fuel with Star Tron enzyme treatment, all year long.
  • All diesel fuel is treated with Howe's Diesel fuel treatment product, every fuel jug, every time, all year long.
  • Always do what you think is best for you. Your results may vary because even mine do.
  • I did pay for the pump and fuel jugs out of my own pocket and I am not being compensated in anyway for this or any review I post.
  • I endorse the products which I like and which meet my needs. I want my friends to experience the same good results which I did, when using these products.
  • I hate to see people who work hard for their money spend it on things which disappoint them or even cause them trouble. Its one of the reasons why I take the time to review such things here on GTT.
  • Things I don't like or which disappoint me, I give the manufacturer and or seller of the items every reasonable chance to resolve the problems or disappointment. I don't just shred them online because things can and do happen which warrant a fair chance to remedy them.
  • I always fairly describe the problem, summarize the communications between myself and the seller and or maker of the product, accurately depicting the story. I also tell the "rest of the story", as Paul Harvey used to say.
  • The Truth, Nothing but the Truth, so help me God. For better or worse. Till death I do part and hopefully not as a result of any reviewed product. ;)
Hope this information is helpful for anyone tired of lifting and pouring from fuel cans and who might not have the ability or equipment to handle a "fuel caddy" or similar type of fuel storage method.


View attachment 738486


View attachment 738489 View attachment 738490 View attachment 738491
Have you tried the Startron diesel additive? It's excellent! No, I don't rant connection with Startron, but it's worked very well for years for me.
 

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Are you tired of man handling Big Jugs / cans? As you age, do you find them harder to handle and just more difficult to keep in the upright, operating position? Do you find them a burden and a real pain in the backside? I have found some jugs I really like and strongly recommend. FUEL JUGS, of course, Diesel or Gasoline.

What better way to avoid lifting the Big Jugs than to be able to pump off the contents into your machine's fuel tank. I recently bought a Terra Pump sold by Sojitek and it works great. Here are the jugs which I have used for years and really like.

https://www.amazon.com/VP-Gallon-Square-Racing-Utility/dp/B00AVA2DJA/ref=sr_1_8?dchild=1&keywords=fuel+jug&qid=1589298817&s=automotive&sr=1-8

Nice features and benefits of the plastic fuel jugs include;
  • Designed to hold 5 gallons, they jugs will hold up to 6 gallons easily.
  • Large threaded filler cap is easy to handle and makes filling the jugs very easy.
  • You can stand at the gas station pump and fill these, instead of having to bend and hover over the smaller, lower containers.
  • The large opening pours easily without using the vent and avoids splashing and "splurshing" fuel.
  • A clear plastic threaded fill tube is available and comes with some of the fuel jugs.
  • If you don't want the plastic fill tube with the jugs, it can save you up to $5 per jug excluding the tube.
  • Jugs are available in red, yellow, purple, green, clear, white, pink, you name it.......they make it. (probably)
The Terra Pump, Sold by Sojitek
  • Bought it from Amazon for $59.99 and had to pay an additional $3.99 in shipping as it does not come from Amazon, but rather from another source.
  • This also made the delivery about 8 days, verses two days for the usual Amazon so if you are in a hurry, carefully check their ship dates before ordering as it could be out as far as 2 weeks from some shipments I have seen.
  • Uses 4 AA batteries but can operate on two, just for a much shorter period of time. 4 batteries are recommended.
  • Has an auto shut off feature which I found actually works when USED CORRECTLY.
  • Works on gasoline, diesel fuel and other fuels and liquids as well. Just don't mix and match with the same pump for best long term results.
  • The draw tube on the pump expands so it can work on a wide range of fuel containers.
  • Pumps 2.4 gallons per minute and it actually achieves this volume (even more, I checked it myself)
  • The Terra Pump comes with an adapter kit with 4 adapters, one of which DOES fit these large fuel jugs.
  • Please note, many of the cheaper or imitation / knock off pumps DO NOT include adapters and require you to order adapter rings separately, at a cost of up to an additional $19. Read the fine print carefully.
  • The cap which comes on the jugs won't accept the fuel pump, but the pump I ordered from the Amazon link does come with a cap which fits these fuel jugs.
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00SBZRELY/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o01_s01?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Using this Battery Powered Fuel Pump
  • You don't squeeze this nozzle to operate it like you do on a gas station pump. There is no handle to squeeze on this nozzle. You push the "power" or "pump" button on top of the pump to operate the pump.
  • This makes using this pump somewhat of a 2 hand operation for many.
  • You can clip the nozzle to many filler necks, depending upon the style, but not all.
  • The pump uses 4 AA batteries and the manufacturer claims it will provide power to pump 100 5 gallon cans of fuel or more.
  • I used this and it will pump over 5 gallons of fuel, very cleanly, quietly and uneventfully in about 2 minutes. In fact, it empties the fuel jugs surprisingly fast.
  • Very nice way to fill items without having to lift the fuel container and POUR or using a funnel.
  • Those who have a Mauser Cab on their tractor will find this is ideal for filling their tractor fuel tank as the cab makes using a funnel or even a large pour hose more difficult. Filling the John Deere diesel tank with this pump is a piece of cake. (y) (y)
Plastic Fuel Jugs, There are a number of Sources and Choices
  • I bought 4 of the VP Branded jugs for $112.98 which included free Prime Shipping from Amazon. It also included the clear plastic fill tubes, which I don't use.
  • These are available in a variety of colors and there are some round shaped and the square shaped like these jugs shown. I prefer the square shape as they are easier to secure in a trailer, etc. against another item or surface for transport.
  • I picked up 2 fro Menard's on Saturday for $18.99 each and also got an additional 11% rebate. They did not include the clear fill tubes which thread into the jugs cap, which is fine as I didn't want the clear pour tubes.
  • These fuel jugs are sold a number of places and the prices vary widely. True Value sells them at $29.99 each, and O'Reilly had them in the store at $37.99 each, but they don't show on their website for some reason.
  • Beware of the thin plastic imported jugs with crappy injection molding and thin seams. They are likely to disappoint you and possibly cause you a mess to clean up.
  • Most all of the caps are the same size, except on some of the knockoff imports and they were some oddball size. Otherwise, these caps all seem to swap between fuel jugs which is handy.
  • Basically, look for the label of quality (made in the USA)
  • Avoid the warning label (imported from China)
  • Note, the interesting label on these jugs, from the manufacturer. The manufacturer says these are not fuel containers as described by the EPA, etc and are do not meet the requirements of other fuel can standards. It's because of the large caps, vents, etc.
  • Actually, the things which make this fail to meet the EPA guidelines are largely the reasons why I prefer these fuel jugs.
  • Note, the jugs I got at Menards are also made in the USA, which is great to see....Texas, it appears..............(y)💪
Why not get a large single fuel cell, instead of a number of individual fuel jugs?
I purposely didn't want a large 35 to 55 gallon "fuel cell" or larger bulk storage tank for a number of reasons, including;
  • Our HOA restricts individual fuel storage tank sizes, but not the number of fuel jugs.
  • Home owners insurance also had limits and special requirements for bulk fuel storage tanks. I store all of my fuel in a detached building more than 100 feet from the house. I never put any fuel jugs, cans, etc. into the garage attached to the house.
  • Local rules require "spill containment walls" on bulk above ground fuel tanks.
  • I don't have an easy way to transport a fuel tank / cell which could weighs 250 to 500 pounds depending upon capacity as I don't have a pick up truck.
  • Fuel delivery charges a premium, plus my storage building is well off the driveway and road and I don't want a fuel truck driving across my yard.
  • I like the flexibility of being able to buy as little as 5 gallons or as much as 80 gallons of fuel depending upon the need and price. I went down last week and filled 12 of the gasoline fuel hugs when gas dropped to $1.20 per gallon. As of today, local gas prices are already back up to $1.88 for regular. That temporary price drop saved me about $50 in the purchase cost of that gasoline purchase.
Final Points to Consider about this Post
  • I use a lot of gasoline in the summer months mowing, on average 15 to 20 gallons per week. But I am also mowing as much as 10 to 12 hours per week. So my needs are different than many / most.
  • I use a lot of diesel fuel plowing snow, as much as 200 gallons per winter (not this winter, only about 22 gallons in total)
  • In the winter, I use very little gasoline and only keep 5 gallons of treated gasoline on hand for my Honda walk behind snow blower.
  • I like to have enough fuel on hand so if there is an emergency, I won't be forced to be in line early to get what I need. As an example, if we had a World Wide Pandemic.......and everything non essential was shut down. Sounds like the stuff of Science Fiction, doesn't it? (eyes rolling, head banging, etc.)
  • I always treat All gasoline fuel with Star Tron enzyme treatment, all year long.
  • All diesel fuel is treated with Howe's Diesel fuel treatment product, every fuel jug, every time, all year long.
  • Always do what you think is best for you. Your results may vary because even mine do.
  • I did pay for the pump and fuel jugs out of my own pocket and I am not being compensated in anyway for this or any review I post.
  • I endorse the products which I like and which meet my needs. I want my friends to experience the same good results which I did, when using these products.
  • I hate to see people who work hard for their money spend it on things which disappoint them or even cause them trouble. Its one of the reasons why I take the time to review such things here on GTT.
  • Things I don't like or which disappoint me, I give the manufacturer and or seller of the items every reasonable chance to resolve the problems or disappointment. I don't just shred them online because things can and do happen which warrant a fair chance to remedy them.
  • I always fairly describe the problem, summarize the communications between myself and the seller and or maker of the product, accurately depicting the story. I also tell the "rest of the story", as Paul Harvey used to say.
  • The Truth, Nothing but the Truth, so help me God. For better or worse. Till death I do part and hopefully not as a result of any reviewed product. ;)
Hope this information is helpful for anyone tired of lifting and pouring from fuel cans and who might not have the ability or equipment to handle a "fuel caddy" or similar type of fuel storage method.


View attachment 738486


View attachment 738489 View attachment 738490 View attachment 738491
I have nothing against big hugs.
 
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