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which way do you plant/point your gardens/greenhouses? rows/ridge east-west or north-south? or does it really matter?
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I prefer East West rows. When I tried rows North and South I planted the tallest plants on the East side, the plants still did not do as well.

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Mom has always done hers north/south, with good success.

I did mine east west, with good success.

I don't think it really matters. I'd say whichever way is longer is the direction of the rows, unless it's square, then no difference.
 

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which way do you plant/point your gardens/greenhouses? rows/ridge east-west or north-south? or does it really matter?
thanks
In my opinion, in regards to a greenhouse, you should have the structure oriented East-West. This orientation will give one of your long walls Southern exposure and direct sunlight hours during the spring and fall seasons. However, if you live closer to the equator and have more consistent sunlight angles year round, I would imagine that you could vary your orientation. If you have solid walls/frames/doors on the ends of your greenhouse, having them on the E-W ends will limit shading of your plants as well. I don't have an opinion on garden rows, people are successful in so many ways considering rows, raised beds, vertical space, I think that your layout of the plants in relation to one another is most important.

I put up a hoop house type structure in the spring time to get transplants started, I'm currently building a second one to house my chickens and ducks closer to the house over winter and we will also utilize this for starting transplants come spring time. This picture is facing West-Northwest.
IMG_1850.jpg
 

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In my opinion, in regards to a greenhouse, you should have the structure oriented East-West. This orientation will give one of your long walls Southern exposure and direct sunlight hours during the spring and fall seasons. However, if you live closer to the equator and have more consistent sunlight angles year round, I would imagine that you could vary your orientation. If you have solid walls/frames/doors on the ends of your greenhouse, having them on the E-W ends will limit shading of your plants as well. I don't have an opinion on garden rows, people are successful in so many ways considering rows, raised beds, vertical space, I think that your layout of the plants in relation to one another is most important.

I put up a hoop house type structure in the spring time to get transplants started, I'm currently building a second one to house my chickens and ducks closer to the house over winter and we will also utilize this for starting transplants come spring time. This picture is facing West-Northwest.
View attachment 456746
Do you have plans or dimensions for your hoop house?

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I can write up exact measurements if you need them, but the beauty of these structures is in their simplicity. This can be taken down and stored during the summer/winter and takes up very little space. All dimensional lumber and items readily available at Home Depot, Lowes or Menards.

End wall (x2) 10'-2x6" Base plate, 36" wide Door framed with 2x4" The height of the door is dictated by the "Hoops" scribed and cut while laying on my barn floor but could also be done upright in place.

IMG_1824.jpg

Side/Base (x2) 14'-2x6" cut at 165" and (2) 1" EMT Conduit Straps secured on inside roughly every 27.5" This is what the hoops will slide in to hold on frame. (Note: 165" + (2x) end wall at 1.5" thick = 168" or 14' total length)

Hoops (x7) 2ea. 10'x3/4" Sched. 40 PVC + 3/4" coupler (Don't forget the PVC Cement!)

Center Beam (x1) 14'-2x4" cut at 165" (Measure specific to your needed length as it may differ depending on hanger) Mine is cheated in to place with scrap 2x4" cutoffs and using (2) Joist Hangers/Hurricane Hangers to run front to back.

Purlins (x2) 14'-1x4" cut at 165" and screwed to each hoop. Can be set at any height along hoop, mine is approximately 30" above the base because I will be wrapping this house with a 36" Poultry Wire Fencing.

Plastic- This is up to you, I will be using the 6mm plastic vapor barrier from Home Depot, 20x100' Roll, but if you wanted to spend the money you could buy actual greenhouse film. The plastic I'm using will only last one season but it's not a permanent structure for me and 1 roll can cover the structure 2-3 times depending on accuracy.

I am using an old 36x36" storm window for the West side of the house and a standard 36" Screen door for the East end, both of which I had laying around.

IMG_1837.jpg

Build the End walls first by placing one screw in the end of the PVC and bend arch to other side to place second screw, then make the ends of the PVC arch parallel with the end of the board and place another screw in each end REMEMBER TO ACCOUNT FOR THE 1.5" WIDTH OF THE SIDES. Then mark the center of the board, frame doors and/or windows, cut frame to length based on the hoop and screw the hoop to the top of the new door/window frame. Next, attach the Side/Base to the end walls (Note: I also pounded 6' T-Posts in the ground to tie the end walls to on the door/window frame). Now you can bend your hoops, sliding them in to the EMT Straps on each side. One hoops are up, place center beam front to back at the level of the hoops on your end walls. Screw the center of each hoop through the 3/4" PVC coupler to the center beam at the same rough 27.5" mark as your EMT straps. Once this is completed you can attach the purlins to the sides at your desired height, simply placed two screws in each arch. I pre-drilled the two ends and once secure I did everything else in place. (Note: For a greenhouse I would like mine 36-48" up the arch and would use as the height for a roll up side for ventilation) Next you will roll out your plastic, and staple to the frame. Place doors and/or windows in the frames. Stand back and admire your work.

My finished hoop house is 10x14' and 7'4" inside height.

The first time I built one of these it took about 8 hours and a hundred trips to Home Depot. Now it takes about 2-3 hours to build and about 1 hour to tear down/reassemble the next season. You can expect to spend around $300 dollars on the project if using all new lumber/screws/hardware. Also, that roll of plastic is $80 alone, but I will use it multiple times so I'm not counting it in the total cost as a whole.

Hope this helps!
 

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Great info. Im going to save this info and look at building one to get a jump start on my spring plants. Looks simple enough. Around February I start getting Spring fever but the ground is frozen.

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