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This is mostly for chainsaws but applies to anything with a small gas engine. I figured saws fall under equipment. I had a friend of mine tell me to use recreational gas because it doesn't have ethanol in it, which according to a lot of people, destroys small engines. Especially two cycle. The fuel stations that carry rec fuel are few and far between here. I was curious if Sta-bil additive works just as well as buying rec fuel? I don't run much that's two cycle. Two saws, a weed whip, and a tiller if I get it fixed this year.
 

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This is mostly for chainsaws but applies to anything with a small gas engine. I figured saws fall under equipment. I had a friend of mine tell me to use recreational gas because it doesn't have ethanol in it, which according to a lot of people, destroys small engines. Especially two cycle. The fuel stations that carry rec fuel are few and far between here. I was curious if Sta-bil additive works just as well as buying rec fuel? I don't run much that's two cycle. Two saws, a weed whip, and a tiller if I get it fixed this year.
I was checking into this a few months ago myself. Just googled it again and here was a relevant article by Husqvarna specifically regarding small engines.

https://www.husqvarna.com/us/forest/basics/ethanol-free-fuel/
 

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Interesting Husqy article . I've always used premium gas from the pump...here I believe it has 10% ethanol. But it is 97 octane. Not had any problems but may revisit my methods.

Correction: I think it's 93 octane.
 

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I use ethanol free gas, treat it with Sta-bil and I've never had a gas related problem. I have two 5 gallon cans that I cycle through and I mix fuel for the 2 strokes 1 gallon at a time from the 5 gallon cans. I don't use a lot of gas, but I don't worry about it's age. I don't think I'd do it like this if I didn't have ethanol free gas.

Just my experience and 2 cents.
 

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Boating area

A lot of gas stations that serve boaters sell ethanol free gas. It costs more but is worth it for chainsaws, trimmers etc. Heck, go to a marina if you need to for a few gallons. If I can't get ethanol free gas, it gets treated AND the carb is run dry before I park the machine.

The Husky article matches my experience and what I hear. Ethanol has a lot of good points but isn't well suited to two stroke engines that get occasional use. Most people use their vehicles enough so storage isn't an issue plus all newer vehicles are designed for it. Most of my small equipment is very old and wasn't designed for ethanol. Come to think of it, I'm old but seem to tolerate a bit of ethanol now and then. If the use goes too high, I too don't run well the next day. . .

Treefarmer
 

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Tru Fuel

I use 50:1 Tru-Fuel in all my 2 cycle engines. No need for sta-bil, has high octane and has no ethanol.
 

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I have a 30-gallon container in which I try to keep 10-15 gallons of gasoline for all my small engines (2-generators, lawn tractor, push mower, leaf blower, etc.). Over the winter I try to maintain a bit more as you never know when the generator will be called into action for extended duty.

I use non-Ethanol gasoline which around here is only available in 91 octane. I also always treat it with Sta-Bil.

Depending on conditions, my gasoline can end up being 3-4 months old, especially in the winter. However, my 2-stroke mix for the leaf blower can end up being a year old. I only mix 1 gallon at a time but it can end up sitting for a long time. I used to drain the leaf blower for winter but then discovered that it works great at clearing the sidewalk and cars when we have those light fluffy snows so I leave it fueled up and ready to go.

I have been following this regiment for over 5 years and have never had an issue with storing the pre-mix for a year. The leaf blower (which is an Echo PB-250) always starts with 2-3 pulls even in 15-20 degree weather.
 
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I use 50:1 Tru-Fuel in all my 2 cycle engines. No need for sta-bil, has high octane and has no ethanol.
Yes but man... that stuff is almost $25 per gallon!
 

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This is a catch 22 for me. You are suppose to get ethanol free 93 octane for these small engines. I can only get one or the other. My ethanol free is 87 octane here. I don’t know what the right choice is. I usually just get 93 octane ethanol fuel and treat it. I really don’t know if the higher octane makes a difference.
 
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This is a catch 22 for me. You are suppose to get ethanol free 93 octane for these small engines. I can only get one or the other. My ethanol free is 87 octane here. I don’t know what the right choice is. I usually just get 93 octane ethanol fuel and treat it. I really don’t know if the higher octane makes a difference.
You should be fine with non-Ethanol 87 octane. What engines are you using? The manuals for all of my small engines always say to use gasoline with an octane of at least 87.

Unless you have a specialized small engine which is VERY high compression, 87 should be fine. If given the choice between 87 non-Ethanol and 93 corn juice I will always take the straight gas.
 

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I use the canned fuel for my chainsaw - I use very little so it is a perfect solution for me.

Since I now have a generator I have to store gasoline which I hate. I have 4) 5 gallon metal cans that I fill with non-ethanol premium once a year and treat with Sta-Bil. When they get to be one year old I pour them into my pickup as I have room and refill them.

I was surprised to find non-ethonol where I live. There is a little country market in town that has it.

Here is a map showing where it is available - seems pretty accurate for my area anyway -

https://www.pure-gas.org/extensions/map.html
 

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You should be fine with non-Ethanol 87 octane. What engines are you using? The manuals for all of my small engines always say to use gasoline with an octane of at least 87.

Unless you have a specialized small engine which is VERY high compression, 87 should be fine. If given the choice between 87 non-Ethanol and 93 corn juice I will always take the straight gas.
This is my situation and I pick the ethanol free.
 

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I use 50:1 Tru-Fuel in all my 2 cycle engines. No need for sta-bil, has high octane and has no ethanol.
This is what I use as well. While the per gallon prices is as steep as gas in Europe, I don't go through enough of it per year to really make much difference.
 

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Yes but man... that stuff is almost $25 per gallon!
Yep, it is expensive no question about that. Sort of like racing fuel, AVGAS (aviation gasoline) and any other high octane, no additive gasoline.

In my area, I would have to drive 25 miles to get ethanol free gasoline and then it is 91 octane which really isn't high enough octane for 2 cycle engines.

There just aren't that many stations that sell ethanol free gasoline in certain parts of the country anymore and even if you do find ethanol free gasoline, what is the octane rating. Here is a user entered non ethanol gasoline website that shows the known non-ethanol gasoline locations in the country.
https://www.pure-gas.org/extensions/map.html

The biggest reason 2 cycle engines have problems in today's fuel world is low octane, additives, and ethanol fuel. The low octane and the other additives that are in pump gasoline causes 2 cycle engines to run hot which causes cylinder scoring not to mention if you let pump gasoline set more than about one month, the octane drops considerably. If you treat it with fuel stabilizer, you may be able to get 3 - 4 months but even then, the octane drops which is a huge problem in 2 cycle engines.

https://www.exxon.com/en/gasoline-safety-storage

I don't have too many pieces of 4 cycle engine equipment anymore. In them, I use high octane pump fuel and treat it with fuel stabilizer and never store fuel longer than 3 months. I also do not leave fuel in the tanks in these pieces of equipment.

Everyone has to make their own choices as to what they use. What ever you do, keep in mind, pump gasoline, even non ethanol gasoline, will loose octane if you store it too long.
 

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In my area, I would have to drive 25 miles to get ethanol free gasoline and then it is 91 octane which really isn't high enough octane for 2 cycle engines.
You must have some very specialized 2-stroke engines. The Echo and Stihl manuals recommend 89 octane for their 2-stroke engines.

Keep in mind, just because the pump gasoline is non-ethanol, doesn't mean it is above 87 octane. It may be??
Of course not. But all gas stations list the octane of all the fuels at the pump, including the non-Ethanol pump. In the Harrisburg area there are three non-Ethanol stations that I am aware of. One offers 87-octane and the other two offers 91-octane. The station who sells the 87-octane and scumbags who've gotten busted for selling ethanol fuel in the non-ethanol pump. The other two are reputable Gulf stations.

Everyone has to make their own choices as to what they use. What ever you do, keep in mind, pump gasoline, even non ethanol gasoline, will loose octane if you store it too long.
That's a good point. Some folks say 91-octane is too high for lawn tractors and other yard equipment and will contribute to fouled plugs. I figure that even though I am buying 91-octane by the time I use it all it's probably down to 87-89. :good2:
 

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You should be fine with non-Ethanol 87 octane. What engines are you using? The manuals for all of my small engines always say to use gasoline with an octane of at least 87.

Unless you have a specialized small engine which is VERY high compression, 87 should be fine. If given the choice between 87 non-Ethanol and 93 corn juice I will always take the straight gas.
My four gas engines are my 2017 X580, Stihl MS250 chain saw I bought in early 2017, and a Stihl FS 111 R I bought about the same time in 2017, and a Stihl FS 55R that I got with the house when I bought it. No idea how old it is, guessing around 10 years old. The FS 111 R is one of those new fangled 4 stoke engines that run off of 2 cycle gas. I have never known which was the best compromise, the ethanol or the octane. Some of you guys think that you need high octane for 2 cycles, some of you don’t. I have no idea.:unknown:
 

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Hiya,

The canned fuels (pre-mix or straight fuel) are great if you only use a small quantity per year however, at an average cost of $20 to $30 per gallon depending on brand and mix, it gets expensive quick if you go through more than a gallon or two per year.

Since I go through about 20 gallons of small engine fuel per year for the various trim mowers, saws, blowers, trimmers etc, I take a run to the small airfield next to my work and fill up a few jerry cans with "Auto-gas" @ $4.30 per gallon. I add old fashioned red Stabil and I'm good for another year. The aviation grade "Auto-Gas" is 91 octane rating and has no EPA mandated emission additives or ethanol for over the road use as it wouldn't be good to have a fuel related issue at 5K feet. I leave the fuel in the equipment in the off seasons and have never had an issue.

For the 2 strokes in the fleet, I pour the auto-gas into a 1 gallon can and mix in Amsoil 100-1 synthetic 2-stroke.
 
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My four gas engines are my 2017 X580, Stihl MS250 chain saw I bought in early 2017, and a Stihl FS 111 R I bought about the same time in 2017, and a Stihl FS 55R that I got with the house when I bought it. No idea how old it is, guessing around 10 years old. The FS 111 R is one of those new fangled 4 stoke engines that run off of 2 cycle gas. I have never known which was the best compromise, the ethanol or the octane. Some of you guys think that you need high octane for 2 cycles, some of you don’t. I have no idea.:unknown:
2 cycle engines need octane. Usually the higher the better.
 
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