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Just another way to keep those rims from being scratched.I used 8" flange gasket (water pluming supply store) and glued them on the weight.
 

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What a great idea! :thumbup1gif:
 

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Just another way to keep those rims from being scratched.I used 8" flange gasket (water pluming supply store) and glued them on the weight.
That was my plan if I decided to mount them on my wheels.
For the backside of the wheels, there would need to be a a steel ring, cut from fairly (1/4"?) thick plate and another gasket there as well.
 

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All interesting solutions!
As someone who is concerned enough about scratches and bad looking paint that I put 3M paint protection film on my suitcase weights and around the footrest area of my 2025 to avoid my boots and whatever is on them from scratching it, I can say that this really is a non-issue for wheel weights.
Movement causes scratching or paint damage.
Installed correctly, you could run them for 30 years and have no damage whatsoever to the wheels or weights.
How do I know this? Because Ive done it.
The old original single notch weights from my Grandfathers 1965 110, which went on his 312, and then on the 318, were taken off by me for maybe the 3rd time in that tractors life, in 2009. While the weights themselves were repainted before their move to the 318, when they came off the last time, the wheels looked like new.
The weights were in great shape too, on the rear. He mostly kept it inside, but occasionally it would stay out in the rain. It pulled a LOT of snow removal duty over its life too.

My point of all of that is this, when I went to install the wheel weights on the 2025, damage to the wheels and the weights was on my mind. I had originally put them on the wheels when I bought it, but due to a tire issue, had to remove them to take care of it. At that point I noticed that Deere did a poor job of painting them from the factory. This allowed the exposed cast iron to rust, and got some rust staining on the wheels. I removed that easily enough, and painted the wheels as they should have been. No big deal to me, with shipping, they generally dont arrive in great condition anyway and almost always need touched up. My intention after this was to install the same paint protection film to the edge of the weight before installing. As I was getting ready to do just that, I had to take a break to do some other work and used the 318. It was during this that I looked down at the wheel and realized that I already had done everything I needed to in an effort to keep the wheels and weights nice.
Anyway, with a good paint layer, and time to fully dry, I reinstalled them.
I fully expect the same results from these that I got from the 318 (and still get, as its still in use here) so that when/if I ever remove them, the wheels will look just as good then as they do now.
The big key to all this though is to make sure the wheel weight is centered as exactly as possible and only then tightened down. Once done this way, they cant possibly move. And as mentioned, if they cant move, they cant damage anything.

All that said, there is nothing wrong at all with coming up with, and putting into effect, ways to keep your tractor looking its best for as long as possible!
And Im also glad Im not the only one who obsesses over this stuff!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
All interesting solutions!
As someone who is concerned enough about scratches and bad looking paint that I put 3M paint protection film on my suitcase weights and around the footrest area of my 2025 to avoid my boots and whatever is on them from scratching it, I can say that this really is a non-issue for wheel weights.
Movement causes scratching or paint damage.
Installed correctly, you could run them for 30 years and have no damage whatsoever to the wheels or weights.
How do I know this? Because Ive done it.
The old original single notch weights from my Grandfathers 1965 110, which went on his 312, and then on the 318, were taken off by me for maybe the 3rd time in that tractors life, in 2009. While the weights themselves were repainted before their move to the 318, when they came off the last time, the wheels looked like new.
The weights were in great shape too, on the rear. He mostly kept it inside, but occasionally it would stay out in the rain. It pulled a LOT of snow removal duty over its life too.

My point of all of that is this, when I went to install the wheel weights on the 2025, damage to the wheels and the weights was on my mind. I had originally put them on the wheels when I bought it, but due to a tire issue, had to remove them to take care of it. At that point I noticed that Deere did a poor job of painting them from the factory. This allowed the exposed cast iron to rust, and got some rust staining on the wheels. I removed that easily enough, and painted the wheels as they should have been. No big deal to me, with shipping, they generally dont arrive in great condition anyway and almost always need touched up. My intention after this was to install the same paint protection film to the edge of the weight before installing. As I was getting ready to do just that, I had to take a break to do some other work and used the 318. It was during this that I looked down at the wheel and realized that I already had done everything I needed to in an effort to keep the wheels and weights nice.
Anyway, with a good paint layer, and time to fully dry, I reinstalled them.
I fully expect the same results from these that I got from the 318 (and still get, as its still in use here) so that when/if I ever remove them, the wheels will look just as good then as they do now.
The big key to all this though is to make sure the wheel weight is centered as exactly as possible and only then tightened down. Once done this way, they cant possibly move. And as mentioned, if they cant move, they cant damage anything.

All that said, there is nothing wrong at all with coming up with, and putting into effect, ways to keep your tractor looking its best for as long as possible!
And Im also glad Im not the only one who obsesses over this stuff!
Once they're on no problem,it's when you put them on or off that it moves and causes the damage.The gasket takes any oops movement while putting them on.
 

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Once they're on no problem,it's when you put them on or off that it moves and causes the damage.The gasket takes any oops movement while putting them on.
True. I cant say Ive ever had an oops moment that caused anything but a mashed finger or three, but I can see what you are after. Same reason I thought about the paint protection film. A guy could put that on the rear side and wrap it over the edge of the weight too, which would further help. The older I get, and less Im able to move these around somewhat easily, the more likely I am to put that into practice.
I will say too that what I was thinking of movement wise was what Ive seen in the past. Guys install the weights, think they are tight, hit a bump or something, then they move a bit.
Mostly, I saw this at plow days, and not all that often, but it makes sense there because lots of guys are installing/adding weights just for that event. Driving with them even the least bit loose can cause some pretty good damage by the end of the day.
 

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So my last gig was a water/wastewater tech. You need to be wary of those gaskets. They almost ALWAYS leave a rubber residue that needs a wire brush to take off, or they peel the paint off when you separate it. That's basically the same size as a fire hydrant head gasket.

YMMV.
 

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So my last gig was a water/wastewater tech. You need to be wary of those gaskets. They almost ALWAYS leave a rubber residue that needs a wire brush to take off, or they peel the paint off when you separate it. That's basically the same size as a fire hydrant head gasket.

YMMV.
I was wondering this. The thought of a thin sheet of UHMW crossed my mind as well. That would be fairly easy to cut with metal shears.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
So my last gig was a water/wastewater tech. You need to be wary of those gaskets. They almost ALWAYS leave a rubber residue that needs a wire brush to take off, or they peel the paint off when you separate it. That's basically the same size as a fire hydrant head gasket.

YMMV.
It's not a fire hydrant gasket and never had any problems taking the weight on and off.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Did yours ever leave a rubber residue?

They're never hard to separate, the rubber just leaves this gooey residue (or dries solid to the paint).
None.
 
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