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Hi All
I am looking at a County Line Auger for my JD 1020. I need to punch 200+ holes, 6 and 9 inch bit, 36 inches deep into rocky hard clay. Do the county line augers come in different gear ratios? Am I better off with 4:1 ratio? I am open to suggestions.
Daniel
 

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Hi All
I am looking at a County Line Auger for my JD 1020. I need to punch 200+ holes, 6 and 9 inch bit, 36 inches deep into rocky hard clay. Do the county line augers come in different gear ratios? Am I better off with 4:1 ratio? I am open to suggestions.
Daniel
My suggestion would be to use a skid steer for this.

Tractor PTO's don't have reverse. When the auger gets a good bite, often it will corkscrew itself into the ground.

If you use the tractor: A) LOTS of weight on the front. B) Go real slow & easy. C) Have a big long bar ready to twist the auger back up out of the ground. In 200+ holes, you're gonna stick an auger.

Can't answer the question about the gear ratio. Figured they were pretty much the same.
 

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My suggestion would be to use a skid steer for this.
^^^^^ What he said.

When you factor in the cost of a post hole digger + 20 lbs. of extra shear bolts + the PITA factor from getting the auger stuck you come pretty close to the cost of renting a skid steer with front auger and completing the job in 1/5 the time with a lot less aggravation. The skid steer route may even cost less.
 

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^^^^^ What he said.



When you factor in the cost of a post hole digger + 20 lbs. of extra shear bolts + the PITA factor from getting the auger stuck you come pretty close to the cost of renting a skid steer with front auger and completing the job in 1/5 the time with a lot less aggravation. The skid steer route may even cost less.
Only buy a PHD if you have a humility problem.


I bought a used county line auger. Its almost always in this state of the picture. Every now and then, i take it out of the cool stand i built to humble (frustrate) myself again. Its now easy to put on, get humbled (frustrated), and take off. It is the one tool that I say has been a complete fail.

I keep hearing tricks. Like lots of weight in the bucket. Don't use the rocker arm to lower (use the bucket), use water to lubricate the hole, keep your hands in the PTO switch for instant off when it starts to auger-in and have the Flash with superpowers to control the PTO switch. I intend to modify the PTO shaft with something to attach a reversing nut..

I keep trying.
 

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I have drilled over 200 holes with my county line digger and 9" bit, and I only buried the bit on the first hole. I broke one shear bolt on a floating rock. Otherwise I run the tractor at 2000rpm up to around 2500 and the 540 output on the PTO. I found that taking small bites and cleaning the hole out a few times on each 36" hole by raising the bit out made things a lot easier. I've used mine in rocky chirt and clay mostly.


When I built my 1200 feet of fence, I did it four or five posts a night in the winter. It took over a month to get all the posts in. I only had an hour of daylight, but I used LED lights on the rollbar to extend my fun. 40 degrees F is about the perfect temperature as long as you are cleaning out the holes and tamping the posts by hand. My neighbor and another friend decided to do their fence work in the 70s. I helped, but they figured out real quick that 70*F is great if you're not doing anything. :laugh:
 
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