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We’ve had some brutally cold temps for 2 weeks now in MA. Went to snowblow today with the 1025r, no go. Plugged in the block heater, let it heat for 45 minutes, then started it and let let run for another 10. Ran fine while warming up, but as soon as I engaged the blower, it chugged and bogged down real bad, and then quit. Looked in the tank and it was fine, secondary fuel filter on the side of the engine looked fine, looked at the inline filter under the left floorboard and it looks like it’s full of lard. Was able to get it started again 10 minutes later to get it back in the shed.

I run the PS winter formula, but when I filled my diesel tanks, they may have still been on the summer fuel.

Will this ungel if I heat the lines and filter enough? I don’t want to run Diesel 911. I have a spare inline filter, but I just changed it for n the fall so I’d rather not do it again unless I have to.

What’s the best way to get the lines and filter ungelled? I was thinking about covering the tractor with a tarp and running a heater under it. What temperature will diesel ungel?
 

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Hiya,

A lot of people are finding they have fuel issues with the cold this winter. First off, heat is your friend. get a torpedo heater and aim it at the tractor, hopefully while it's in a barn or shelter and let it get warm. Go get gallon of kerosene, once the tractor is warm from the heater, put the kerosene in the tank and let it sit for a bit and work. The combination of the heat and kerosene should allow the paraffin to return to solution and the fuel to thin to a liquid.

Read this post I did for tips on how to live with a Diesel in cold temps: http://www.greentractortalk.com/forums/tractor-equipment-maintenance/145602-toms-ten-tips-low-temps-diesel-fuel.html
 

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...the inline filter under the left floorboard and it looks like it’s full of lard.
Like this?
filter.jpg

Rest assured you are not alone. Normally I buy my fuel at the local Co-op that caters to farmers and truckers, never had gelling problems. Because the fuel jug was empty, the convenience store handy on the way home from work, and I've used their summer fuel with out issue; has been nothing but problems. Replaced the filter, drained/replaced the fuel and she's good to go.
 
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View attachment 522578

Rest assured you are not alone. Normally I buy my fuel at the local Co-op that caters to farmers and truckers, never had gelling problems. Because the fuel jug was empty, the convenience store handy on the way home from work, and I've used their summer fuel with out issue; has been nothing but problems. Replaced the filter, drained/replaced the fuel and she's good to go.
Exactly like that. There isn’t any gelling in the tank (the fuel in the tank has the PS winterizer); so I may not have to drain and refill the fuel, the wintrizer may have just not worked it’s way into the lines ( I filled it up and probably didn’t run it long enough to get it through all the lines).

If there is gelling in the lines/injectors, how to I clear that out?
 

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Exactly like that. There isn’t any gelling in the tank (the fuel in the tank has the PS winterizer); so I may not have to drain and refill the fuel, the wintrizer may have just not worked it’s way into the lines ( I filled it up and probably didn’t run it long enough to get it through all the lines).

If there is gelling in the lines/injectors, how to I clear that out?
As Tomd suggested...HEAT and kerosene.
 

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I run the PS winter formula, but when I filled my diesel tanks, they may have still been on the summer fuel.
I would have thought treated summer fuel would be ok. I only use about 10-gallons of fuel a year. As a result when winter gets here I still have a full tank of whatever I bought in the summer along with a few gallons in my dispenser - all treated with JD Summer Fuel Protect. I used to drain out all my summer fuel in the fall, dump it in my heating oil tank, and then refill with fresh diesel and treat with JD Winter Fuel Protect.

Then I read on a JD site that you can use the Winter Fuel Protect all year if you like. So that is what I have been doing. I no longer drain out my summer fuel. What I have in the tractor now is fuel I bought in the summer, treated with the JD Winter Fuel Protect. So far, even though the temps have been around zero I don't think I see any gelling. We haven't had any snow lately and I'm not going to start the tractor just to see if it starts. But I looked in the tank and it looks ok. The clear bowl on the water separator looks ok. And I have about 1/2 gallon of the leftover treated summer fuel in the bottom of my 5-gallon can and it looks clear and shloshes around like water.

I'm keeping my fingers crossed that treated summer fuel is ok.
 
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If your filter looks like that, chuck it, it's never going to flow properly again even if you soak it in Diesel 911. As I said, heat is your friend, heating the tractor and consequently the fuel in the lines, filters and tank above 50 degrees F will allow the paraffin to go back into solution.

When you treated with PS did you use the "normal" dosage or the "cold temp" ratio? Basically the normal is for down to a little below freezing and the cold temp dose is for below 0F according to the label IIRC. Adding kerosene at 20% will further the cold temp ability of the fuel.

2 things happen to Diesel as it cools, the first is clouding, this is when the paraffin begins to come out of solution and collect. When it does this the molecules form square blocks, As more comes out of solution, these blocks form large structures that are just the right size to get stopped by the filters. The squares stack very well and will form a barrier to flow. When you add winter treatment, it changes the paraffin chemically so when it falls out of solution it no longer forms blocks, it forms thin strands. These strands either pass through the filter element because they are smaller than the micron rating of the filter or lay down on the surface like a bunch of sticks, since some fuel can flow through the collection of sticks, the filter still flows.

The second thing that happens is that the liquid part of the fuel thickens with declining temps, this will continue until the fuel is a solid. The fuel is still a fuel however the pumps can't move it so the equipment stops running.

Winter treatment lowers the temp that clouding and gelling occur and chemically alter the paraffin to that filters are able to deal with it.
 

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If your filter looks like that, chuck it, it's never going to flow properly again even if you soak it in Diesel 911. As I said, heat is your friend, heating the tractor and consequently the fuel in the lines, filters and tank above 50 degrees F will allow the paraffin to go back into solution.
Your comment about Diesel 911 reminded me that the tractor first started having issues a couple of days ago, against my better judgement I put in some 911. Got it running thought it was good to go, used it for maybe 30 minutes. After much more reading in the forum, I realized the 911 was not the right thing to do after it gelled the second time and then corrected by draining the fuel and replacing the filter. This filter had 911 in the fuel mix for over 48 hours and is proof that it has negligible effects on the previously gelled fuel. It got the tractor running, but certainly was not the "magic fix"

Man, I'm ready for some balmy 30* weather....
 

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Diesel 911 is very popular in WI.

 

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Looked in the tank and it was fine, secondary fuel filter on the side of the engine looked fine, looked at the inline filter under the left floorboard and it looks like it’s full of lard.
On New Year’s Day had the same problem. Put a space heater directly under the filter and in about 1-2 hours the “lard” turned completely to liguid. Then tractor fired right up. Put some 911 in the tank and haven’t had a problem since, even tho it has been cold as heck since.

My question is fuel type. I use off road (reddish) all the time, but someone suggested using on road fuel (yellowish). Said the winterized is more readily available than off-road and is cheaper. They use Irving stations winter mix on-road fuel and have never had a gell problem. But not sure if I should use on-road.
 

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You got all the best advice already, but here's some stuff I've been doing.

1. Carry spare filters on the tractor, along with the clamps and pliers you need to change it. If you don't have the back hoe sub-frame, it takes seconds to change that filter. If your tractor stalls and dies and won't do more than idle (or won't run at all), change that filter, start, run, get it back in the shed. If you do have the back hoe sub-frame, it's a pain in the ass but you can still do it.

2. Keep a 5 gallon jug of diesel in your house (or somewhere warm). No matter how cold it gets, you can siphon out your existing fuel and pour that in. You will have a long while before it cools to ambient temperature that you can use to clear snow or do whatever you have to do. If you can't get all your fuel out because it's gelled, adding fuel that's 70F will go a long way to fixing that. That and a changed filter and you're good to go.
 

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Ended up having fuel gel in my 1026r yesterday. Added 9-1-1, and changed the in-line fuel filter. Tractor would only run when I put a heat gun to the filter, and then only for about a minute. Temps -10F. This morning, ended up draining the tank, changing the in-line filter again, and the other filter as well, precautionary. Fun times changing the in-line filter in an unheated garage, with the Backhoe frame in the way. Filled tank with cut diesel, all good now. -5F out now.
 

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All these stories and experiences about fuel gelling and such issues are why I have always treated my fuel year around with Howe's fuel treatment and I also always use more of the treatment than is required. There is no negative to using excess product other than it's very minimal cost and there are benefits of improving the fuel burn.

I use an ounce of Howe's to a gallon of fuel year around and have always run that ratio including in my 455 which I purchased new and it has about 2,700 hours on it and it's never had a fuel related issue. That 455 is stored in an unheated building since the new tractor gets the 3rd stall on the house garage.....

Recently, I was in a local fuel station which has 4 diesel pumps and a dozen or so gas pumps. They are right off the interstate and the only fuel station within 20 miles on that stretch of highway.

The guy in front of me, who was fueling his farm truck on the other side of the diesel pumps asked the clerk, "You guys treat your diesel don't you?" The clerk was quiet for a minute and then replied "Yes" and she gave the guy his receipt and out the door he went.

As I stepped up to pay for the diesel I had put in the fuel jugs for my tractor, there was a shift change going on and the clerk coming on duty had walked up and was carrying her cash register tray. The clerk who had just answered "Yes" to the customer who had asked her about whether the fuel is treated turned to the clerk who was just coming on duty and asked her "Is our fuel treated?" The clerk coming on duty replied "Treated with what?" and the other clerk, who had just told the customer their fuel was treated replied "I don't know, some guy just asked me if it was treated and I said yes and he seemed satisfied."

So much for that answer............

I suggest ALWAYS treatimg your own fuel so you can be assured it's treated and treat it year around as there is no downside to using the treatment year around other than costing you a few pennies per gallon. A 1 gallon bottle of Howe's fuel treatment costs about $20. A gallon has 128 fluid ounces. That means that at $20 per gallon, the treatment costs about $0.16 cents per ounce and I am spending $0.80 cents to treat a 5 gallon fuel jug. Technically, I could use one ounce per 5 gallons and still meet the mnimum treatment ratio suggested.

For temps above zero, they recommend 1 oz of Howe's to 5 gallons and below zero, they recommend 2.5 ounces to 5 gallons. I always run one ounce per gallon because it improves the fuels lubricating qualities and how it burns.

While I happen to like Howe's, there are plenty of good products to choose from. Lucas makes a good product as do probably 50 other companies. I would suggest just picking one you like and sticking with it....................and use it YEAR AROUND to deal with the deficiencies of the Ultra Low Sulfur Diesel Fuel.

From their website.......................

""The introduction of ULSD has created several serious problems for diesel powered vehicles. During the refining process of removing sulfur, important properties such as lubricity and BTU’s are reduced. Howes Diesel Treat will help prevent your diesel fuel from gelling in cold weather and correct the inherent problems caused by ULSD fuel. Howes Diesel Treat replaces the lost lubricity and compensates for lower BTU’s by improving combustion, resulting in more power and better MPG’s.

Howes Diesel Treat demulsifies or displaces water out of the fuel, leaving only pure fuel to burn. As the vehicle moves and agitates, water is easily removed by the water separator. Products that emulsify or disperse water into the fuel are usually alcohol or solvent based and can further damage key system components by allowing water to pass through the fuel water separator. Since water is abrasive, it tends to score or wear down the close metal to metal tolerance of the injection system causing smoke and loss of MPG’s.


The perfect solution to prevent these problems is to treat each purchase of ULSD fuel with Howes Diesel Treat.
Prevents diesel fuel from gelling.
Safely removes water from diesel fuel.
Contains no alcohol or other harmful solvents.
Increases power and fuel economy.
Cleans and lubricates fuel injectors.
Eliminates smoking and rough idle.
Free Tow Guarantee!
Safe and effective in all diesel and
biodiesel blends to B-20.
Particulate filter friendly and warranty safe.
Howes Diesel Treat lowers the Cold Filter Plugging Point of your base fuel. Howes Diesel Treat provides superior cold weather performance and is much more cost effective than blending with kerosene.

Also, I have seen the damage which alcohol does to fuel system and engine components. I used to race a Top Alcohol dragster and I bought alcohol fuel by the 55 gallon drums. You would be amazed how corrosive it is to fuel system parts. I always ran a special top oil and scenting agent in the fuel to help deal with the issues. After seeing what I have first hand, the last thing you ever want to subject your tractor to is the Emergency 911 Fuel rescue product stuff to try and get it running.


 

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I’ve said this a bunch of times, I’ll say it again. Alcohol has ZERO business in any diesel engine, let alone a modern one. 911 has a specific function. Use it only in emergency to rescue your machine, not to carry on regular operations. Alcohol WILL absolutely destroy your highly expensive fuel system.

Please read up on these products BEFORE you dump them into your fuel system. The wrong additive can be much much worse than no additive at all.
 

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On New Year’s Day had the same problem. Put a space heater directly under the filter and in about 1-2 hours the “lard” turned completely to liguid. Then tractor fired right up. Put some 911 in the tank and haven’t had a problem since, even tho it has been cold as heck since.

My question is fuel type. I use off road (reddish) all the time, but someone suggested using on road fuel (yellowish). Said the winterized is more readily available than off-road and is cheaper. They use Irving stations winter mix on-road fuel and have never had a gell problem. But not sure if I should use on-road.
First I would say, avoid products like 911 unless it is a true emergency, that is their ONLY purpose.
Second, on road diesel and off road diesel are the same exact product, one with dye and one without. That being said, if you have a reputable high turnover place to buy on road with weather like this there is a very good chance it is blended with clear kero (#1 ULSD) that is the best insurance you have, but it is also important to note that you MUST still use a additive to give back lubricity to your fuel.
 
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First I would say, avoid products like 911 unless it is a true emergency, that is their ONLY purpose.
Second, on road diesel and off road diesel are the same exact product, one with dye and one without. That being said, if you have a reputable high turnover place to buy on road with weather like this there is a very good chance it is blended with clear kero (#1 ULSD) that is the best insurance you have, but it is also important to note that you MUST still use a additive to give back lubricity to your fuel.
Thanks, I didn’t know they were the same product. I thought on-road had a higher sulfur content. Deere says use a low sulfur fuel. I guess I will switch over as the Irving station definitely turns over the fuel much quicker and I know they winterize.

I use the JD winter additive, but the filter still gelled. Maybe I didn’t use enough. Never used 911, but felt it would help clear the gelling. Won’t be using it regularly based on the posts here.
 
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I use the JD winter additive, but the filter still gelled. Maybe I didn’t use enough. Never used 911, but felt it would help clear the gelling. Won’t be using it regularly based on the posts here.
Eeeee... you're the first I've read to report that. What was the dosage you used of the JD stuff? It is supposed to be 1.5oz per 5 gallons.
 
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For those of you who have experienced fuel gelling or hard starting consider using a small electric room heater under the tractor to take the chill out and warm the engine and fuel system components.

I get called over to the farm next door to assist with their equipment on occasion. A small battery charger along with the portable heater are usually my first few steps for getting their rigs out of the deep freeze.

As mentioned in another thread a tarp over the tractor along with some supplemental heat will help get things going rather quickly.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
 
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Eeeee... you're the first I've read to report that. What was the dosage you used of the JD stuff? It is supposed to be 1.5oz per 5 gallons.
I fill the tractor tank and then pour in about 2oz. Maybe I should be pouring in 3 or 4 ounces.
Or maybe it was just too darn cold over the last few weeks as others have also had gell problems.
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