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Should I eliminate the primary filter for winter

  • Yes - should be alright

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • No - Bad Idea

    Votes: 21 100.0%
  • No Idea - but good question

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    21
  • Poll closed .
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Discussion Starter #1
Ya hey, Well ditz dat time-a-da yer for us youperz, yayas, polaks, sweeds and homies of all shades of green and yellow.
Diesel gellin on dem chilly winter nights again...
I was wondering if anyone has tried a submersible warmer in the fuel tank, or if anyone has any ideas for trying such a thing...
I have found that having warm fuel to begin with is the best, if not only way to get my snow work done in temperatures zero and below. (Keeping diesel in the basement works - as long as you plan ahead running fuel in tractor low.)
SURE - Treatment seems to do the trick down to zero, but she will run rough and cough and choke at times when your blower demands extra power or climbing a hill.
I have been tempted to eliminate the primary filter, as having two filters seems a bit of an overkill. Mainly because this is the one which always clogs, AND is in the absolute silliest location for changing. (Not difficult, but can be a messy SOB.)

So, there it is, if anyone has any ideas or thoughts, I welcome them. If anyone knows the microns of the two fuel filtering elements - I would love to know. For now, I want to assume the one on the engine block is a much finer micron than the paper like “primary” element. I think changing the secondary more often (which I do anyway) would suffice...
 

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.....im kinda wondering how you eliminate your primary filter.......and if you could eliminate it what would you gain?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
.....im kinda wondering how you eliminate your primary filter.....
Simple, run a new hose from tank to the secondary filter (the one hanging off of the engine with the red water level indicator) or splice in a piece of hose or plastic tube.
 

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Moved to general forum since this is applicable to all tractor sizes, and I voted "no-bad idea"
Using a GOOD treatment protocol with a GOOD product like Stanodyne, Opt--Lube, or the JD brand treatment is the proper thing to do BEFORE gelling occurs,
 

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Leave the filter, the system needs it. Use some "Howes" mixed in the fuel and I am sure (depending where you live) your tractor will be fine. I had a fuel heater on my newest Mack truck and they do work, but mine only worked when the truck was running. I still treated the fuel. When the unit failed, it was not replaced. All the years my machinery worked thru the winter we treated the fuel and/or added kero without serious problems. Keep a spare filter and use some common sense..........
 

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Simple, run a new hose from tank to the secondary filter (the one hanging off of the engine with the red water level indicator) or splice in a piece of hose or plastic tube.
That secondary filter you are talking about is not technically a filter - it’s a water seperator. If you remove the primary filter you are risking big damage to a very expensive fuel injection system.
 

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I'm wondering what you consider cold temperatures. We get down to zero+ and I don't run anything. They use to cut the diesel here but don't even do that now. Now for winter we get "real" diesel. This is bulk delivered to farm
 

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I got curious this fall and asked google about this subject. One of google's solutions was to add 1 gal of kerosene to 4 gals of D2. So clue me in on the hazards if any for the little 1026, cus I got 1 gal kero in the tank.
 

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I got curious this fall and asked google about this subject. One of google's solutions was to add 1 gal of kerosene to 4 gals of D2. So clue me in on the hazards if any for the little 1026, cus I got 1 gal kero in the tank.
That is how the farm diesel was cut from the supplier. I do not know the ratio though.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Leave the filter, the system needs it. Use some "Howes" mixed in the fuel and I am sure (depending where you live) your tractor will be fine. I had a fuel heater on my newest Mack truck and they do work, but mine only worked when the truck was running. I still treated the fuel. When the unit failed, it was not replaced. All the years my machinery worked thru the winter we treated the fuel and/or added kero without serious problems. Keep a spare filter and use some common sense..........
Ya, that’s what I have been doing. Went through a bunch of filters last year. Kerosene is really not good for the engine and especially for today’s injectors. My understanding is kerosene is not ULSDiesel in that it is less oily - which keeps your injection system and cylinders lubed.
The water separating just happens in that secondary filter but it’s using the principle of water being heavier than oil. Once the water hits that filter you have a problem.
Come late January and February I am dealing, at times, with -20 to -40 F and colder then with -70 or so wind chills. The government mandated bio-diesel here just doesn’t stay liquid no matter what you do to it. And what you are doing to it is abrasive to the engine components - especially when it is cold.
 

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Check this video out:

Yeah, love that video. No idea if his method has true scientific merit, but it looks reasonable to me. After watching this video a few weeks ago I included all my Howe's stuff in my monthly trip to the Hazardous Waste place and bought Hot Shot Secret. I use that stuff in addition to the additive that my local convenience store puts in their diesel, and I fill my 5 gallon can with 50-50 diesel #1 and diesel #2. We've had -20 temps already this season.
 

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I'm wondering what you consider cold temperatures. We get down to zero+ and I don't run anything. They use to cut the diesel here but don't even do that now. Now for winter we get "real" diesel. This is bulk delivered to farm
I think you will find that the diesel delivered to the farm is automatically mixed according to the temps at the time. I forgot to specify 100% #2 diesel when I got my delivery on 11/22 and the ticket shows 80/20. Temps rarely get below zero here and I don't use very much fuel during the winter, so now I am stuck with two summers of 80/20 and I am not happy. I can usually dose it with enough winter additive to get by without mixing it. They will no longer deliver anything less than 200 gal at a time and I don't use that much in any one year.

Dave
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I'm wondering what you consider cold temperatures. We get down to zero+ and I don't run anything. They use to cut the diesel here but don't even do that now. Now for winter we get "real" diesel. This is bulk delivered to farm
Around January sometime we will go below zero and may not see any above zero temperatures for weeks or maybe until March. Within that period we will generally see -20 to -40ish with wind chills in the area of -60 to -75. Granted, at -40 a mouse fart will drop the wind chill factor three degrees...
We have bio-diesel here of up to 20 percent I believe. It’s crap diesel... - But it’s all they let us have in communist Minnesota. You know... for the cause... ✊
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I got curious this fall and asked google about this subject. One of google's solutions was to add 1 gal of kerosene to 4 gals of D2. So clue me in on the hazards if any for the little 1026, cus I got 1 gal kero in the tank.
DMagers,
You should be okay. It is damaging over time. It is just that Kerosene has way way less lubricity than no.2 and still less than no.1 (aka blended). The higher sulfur content gives it the lower freeze point. But higher sulfer means more cylinder wear and fuel injection component wear.
Just not something you want to use if you can help it, these days. These days meaning, the components of years past did not have the tight tolerance of today’s equipment and lets face it, they had way better iron and steel back then...

so you want to find an additive which has a lubricant added to it.
 

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After watching this video a few weeks ago I included all my Howe's stuff in my monthly trip to the Hazardous Waste place

Most of the "Big Box Store" treatments are loaded with alcohol, that is like sandpaper in a modern fuel injection system.
 

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Most of the "Big Box Store" treatments are loaded with alcohol, that is like sandpaper in a modern fuel injection system.
That would be a concern, but Hot Shot's Secret Diesel Extreme has no alcohol according to the MSDS. The video above indicates that it has a much lower wear scar on his "modified" HFRR test method than any of the other additives, barely beating out the Stanadyne. Howe's actually created a worse wear scar than plain old untreated diesel, speaking of sandpaper.
 

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Seems I have some leaning to do. tough the higher sulfur content helped provided better lubricity. And all this lubricity additive stuff was because ULSD was low in lubricity.

Uhhhh, now ole pranoid me is gonna add a little two stroke oil in the tank also. After watching the video, I am gonna get sum Stanodyne next time I am in the city. :confused:
 
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