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Hello all,

Heading up to our cabin this weekend to clean out the trash around it. It's about a 500-mile journey.

I am looking for any tips anyone has for hauling my 1025r

I have a 16' tandem axle heavy duty trailer (#7000).

I am not new to towing, but new to towing a piece of equipment that far. The FEL/MMM/Ballast box are all going along for the ride.

I guesstimating weights are
1500 1025r
300 mmm
500 FEL
200 (empty) ballast box

All that takes me to 2500#, Trailer is 2100# so I am good weight wise, I have a tongue weight scale, and think I am shooting for 500lbs on it.

Any difference loading front or back?

Any other thoughts?

Thanks in advance!
 

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Sounds like you have pleanty of trailer. I would drive it on forward once on trailer lower FEL pull has far forward has possible then drop ballast box. I always use chain on front and rear. I would stop after 30-45 miles and check it make sure it's still good and tight. If you strap it use heavy duty ones and make sure there are no sharp edges to cut them. I see a lot of strap ends on the road and just wonder if the user knew what they were doing. Good luck. :good2:
 

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Here is how I do mine.

Straps over the front axle or in this case I used the front weight bracket straight to the D-rings/anchors. Each strap gets it's own anchor (no sharing).

First set of rear straps get attached to the tow-bar and run out to their own anchor points (no sharing).

Second set of rear straps through the backhoe (transport pin installed) get run to their own anchor points (no sharing).

Chain looped around right rear axle and around rear structure of trailer (like an ICC bumper but is just exposed box tubing for the ramps). I don't put a binder on this, it is only to throw the tractor to the right in the event of an impact.
20170408_214028.jpg 20170408_215545.jpg 20170408_215557.jpg 20170408_215606.jpg

Use the heaviest straps you can get your hands on. 20k pound straps are cheap for a set of 4. 30k pound straps aren't that much more expensive. Don't cheat yourself out of safety for a few dollars worth of straps.

If you don't have the hoe to strap around there is no reason not to strap around your weight box. The more anchors you have on the rear the better. Chances of a front end collision are greater than any kind and are the most dangerous when towing. Secure that equipment well from the rear as best as you can.
 

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YouTube

There's a guy on YouTube named "Tractor Mike." If you go to his channel and look through his videos, he did a multi series of tractor loading/unloading/securing videos thats really good. He also gives really good tips. If I was unsure or needed a refresher, that's where I'd go.

Been keeping in back of my mind for when I get my own trailer.
 

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Been keeping in back of my mind for when I get my own trailer.
I immediately learned when I bought my 1025r... You need a trailer. I almost suggest anyone buying one, to budget a trailer. You will want to take it places to use it.
 

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I immediately learned when I bought my 1025r... You need a trailer. I almost suggest anyone buying one, to budget a trailer. You will want to take it places to use it.
That is true... but between work, kids, their sports, holidays, keeping up on property, birthdays, keeping vehicles running... it's almost easier telling friends and family I can't cause I can't haul it. Makes it easier.

Friend of mine explained to his neighbors his homeowners doesn't cover it off his property. LOL
 

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That is true... but between work, kids, their sports, holidays, keeping up on property, birthdays, keeping vehicles running... it's almost easier telling friends and family I can't cause I can't haul it. Makes it easier.

Friend of mine explained to his neighbors his homeowners doesn't cover it off his property. LOL
Thruth of it is that is exactly what my insurance agent told me.
 

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There's a guy on YouTube named "Tractor Mike." If you go to his channel and look through his videos, he did a multi series of tractor loading/unloading/securing videos thats really good. He also gives really good tips. If I was unsure or needed a refresher, that's where I'd go.

Been keeping in back of my mind for when I get my own trailer.
Here are links to Tractor Mike videos to get you started.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gSneY4H9cYI
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iF-qdIR5xmM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OZbX8giqnJA
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DbWH2-bJoVE
 

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I would like to point out that although you may not be a commercial vehicle, a commercial vehicle inspector will surely write you a ticket for not resting the backhoe bucket on the trailer and adding a strap across the top of it. Never rely on the hoe lock to secure the hoe in transport. It will also help relieve strain on the hydraulics should the pin fail. In addition the stabilizer legs are supposed to be in the down position as well, however very few trailers can transport in this fashion. When not possible, a strap or chain with binders is required between the feet when in the up position.

Don't ask me how I learned these rules.
 

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I would like to point out that although you may not be a commercial vehicle, a commercial vehicle inspector will surely write you a ticket for not resting the backhoe bucket on the trailer and adding a strap across the top of it. Never rely on the hoe lock to secure the hoe in transport. It will also help relieve strain on the hydraulics should the pin fail. In addition the stabilizer legs are supposed to be in the town position as well, however very few trailers can transport in this fashion. When not possible, a strap or chain with binders is required between the feet when in the up position.

Don't ask me how I learned these rules.
:bigthumb::bigthumb: So very true.
 

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That is true... but between work, kids, their sports, holidays, keeping up on property, birthdays, keeping vehicles running... it's almost easier telling friends and family I can't cause I can't haul it. Makes it easier.

Friend of mine explained to his neighbors his homeowners doesn't cover it off his property. LOL
My trailer needs a new deck. I have to admit the slow repair time is directly related to this. No one can borrow it or ask me to bring the tractor over if it isn't road worthy. And since I haven't needed it...


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
Thanks all for the great answers, I set up my distributing hitch tonight (used one before, never had one for this trailer)

It looks like ill have about 650lbs on the tongue all loaded up, should be within the limit.

The only problem I am having is I need more "drop" from my shank I can't get the ball low enough to make the trailer level correctly; line splits the bubble.... Sounds like a shopping trip for one before I go.

I did run it in forwards, a better balance that way.
 

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<SNIP>

Friend of mine explained to his neighbors his homeowners doesn't cover it off his property. LOL
According to mine I'm covered for liability such as throwing a rock into something while snow blowing a neighbors driveway (as long I am not doing it as a business) but not for damage to the tractor off of my property. That's why I also have the coverage UltraGuard through Deere.
 

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Using straps or chains I would buy some protective sleeves to put on them anywhere they meet the tractor or implement you are hauling. Even though the front weight bracket or rear hitch don't feel sharp they can wear on a strap on a 500 mile trip. And they will protect the metal surfaces if you are using chains.
 

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Believe the 200cx with bucket is @ 650lbs last I recall.
 

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Thruth of it is that is exactly what my insurance agent told me.
Actually exactly what he told me was the machine is covered on our property. If I was to take it somewhere else that I should carry at least a small umbrella policy. If I was to do "for hire" work the best way is to register a business name with the county and carry a legitimate liability policy.


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Hello all,

Heading up to our cabin this weekend to clean out the trash around it. It's about a 500-mile journey.

I am looking for any tips anyone has for hauling my 1025r

I have a 16' tandem axle heavy duty trailer (#7000).

I am not new to towing, but new to towing a piece of equipment that far. The FEL/MMM/Ballast box are all going along for the ride.

I guesstimating weights are
1500 1025r
300 mmm
500 FEL
200 (empty) ballast box

All that takes me to 2500#, Trailer is 2100# so I am good weight wise, I have a tongue weight scale, and think I am shooting for 500lbs on it.

Any difference loading front or back?

Any other thoughts?

Thanks in advance!

Just use good chains and boomers or nylon straps and you will be fine.

Stop a few miles out after you leave and double check the tightness of all and when you make any other stops or every 150 miles.

I always secure the hood of my tractor by using another strap, rope, or even bungee cord. I don't always trust the latch and if the wind should happen to get under it, it would be ripped off in no time.
 

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I always lower any implement down to the trailer bed and chain everything down and I also put a 4x4 down in front and also one in back of the rear tires toenailed into the floor of the trailer just in case. I've never had mine move even an inch.
 
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