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Discussion Starter #1
Last year I had gelling problems, so this year I did everything "right." I used treated winter blend diesel (Howe's, using their recommended double dosage for low temps), block heater, transmission oil heater...had both running night (not that it has anything to do with the gelling, but still...).

The freakin' diesel still gelled and clogged up my filter. Changing the filter bought me 20 minutes to blow my driveway, but then it started dying again and I quickly put it away before it was fully clogged.

I mean...what do I have to do to keep this from happening?? Why are diesels such POS for cold temps?

Do I have to buy an X739 (gasoline!) with a blower as a backup?

What do you guys do?
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Gelling isn't the right word, because it's not actually gelled. It's CFPP (Cold Filter Plug Point), when the separated paraffin wax clogs up your fuel filter.

In my case, despite the fact that the fuel is treated to prevent this very thing from happening. And it must have started happening yesterday at like 15-20F, because it happened pretty fast this morning. It took less time for the initial filter to plug up than it's replacement.

I'll have to drain all of this fuel and try again.
 

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Have you been getting fuel in the same place as last year? I don’t know what else to think as you are doing everything right it seems as you stated. The reason I ask is about water in the fuel but you seem to have plain old gelling and not a water issue...

In all my years running diesels at work and home I only had one gel incident which was out of my control. Working for the state - it was December - and they hadn’t gotten a new shipment of winter fuel in our 10k gal tank. Every plow truck never made it out of their parking spaces. Talk about a panic at the beginning of a storm!
 

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Where in NY are you? I lived in NY (lower Hudson valley for 30 years-no longer there) never a problem. Temps at times went to negative 5. Never had to ad anything to the diesel or use any kind of heaters. If I had enough power in the battery to roll the engine I would get a start. Difficult to start at low temps, but once going never a problem. Can't understand what's causing your problem. Sorry.

I think you should try a different diesel supplier. I bet the problem is with the fuel. You might be getting a diesel with a lot of dirt & crap in it or a really low end quality. Can you get it from a supplier that sells a lot to truck diesel operators? If your getting it from a place that sees very little diesel sales you might be getting junk.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Same place, yes. I read an article after posting this stating that diesel fuel quality is inconsistent this year. Maybe that's it. I don't know. Here's the article: Why More Diesel Tanks are Gelling This Winter - Mansfield Energy Corp

It's just getting really frustrating. At this point if these tractors came with optional gasoline engines I'd be all over it.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Where in NY are you? I lived in NY (lower Hudson valley for 30 years-no longer there) never a problem. Temps at times went to negative 5. Never had to ad anything to the diesel or use any kind of heaters. If I had enough power in the battery to roll the engine I would get a start. Difficult to start at low temps, but once going never a problem. Can't understand what's causing your problem. Sorry
Catskills, Delaware County. It was -8F last night and about 3F this morning. Tractor started right up (block heater all night) and ran great until it started to die. Then it was obviously a clogged filter causing it, confirmed by the fact that changing it gave me about 20 minutes of flawless operation. At which point it started doing it again.
 

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Same place, yes. I read an article after posting this stating that diesel fuel quality is inconsistent this year. Maybe that's it. I don't know. Here's the article: Why More Diesel Tanks are Gelling This Winter - Mansfield Energy Corp

It's just getting really frustrating. At this point if these tractors came with optional gasoline engines I'd be all over it.
I can certainly feel your frustration. Your thread on this last year was a good one - you heeded all the good advise but you are still having issues. At this point I would drain any fuel left in the tractor and get some fresh fuel from a different place.

I know it shouldn’t matter since you are treating your fuel properly, but...in desperation I would try it.

I actually buy summer fuel in bulk and treat it on delivery so it’s good for winter. I used Power Service for years and have now been using Stanadyne (my favorite) the last couple years. We had quite a few nights last winter at -20* and never a problem.

I hope you can figure this out - don’t abandon your diesel!
 

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Are you sure it's the fuel jelling and not some kind of contamination in your tank?
If the fuel was reaching it's cloud point, you could just warm the filter up and the paraffin will melt right off.
I don't suppose you could post a picture of what is on the filter element?
What temperatures are you experiencing this at?
 

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I've had the same problem. I buy fuel at a Stewart's, which is a very large local chain and they move a lot of product. I never had a problem stalling (starting was another issue) with the old 650 I sold early last year. With the relatively new 3038e I had a huge block of ice in the separator for starters. After I cleared that up I keep a close watch on the red ring. Lately I have had a problem where I get some kind of fuel blockage but there is no water in the separator.

I bought a bottle of Diesel 911 and that seems to have helped. Never treated fuel before this year.

Al
 

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Here what I have always used Diesel Fuel Supplement +Cetane Boost - Power Service and I have never Had a gelling Problem and I have a Bottle Of Howe's That I have never Used. The Power System additive is what my dealer Has always recommend and the Farmers around here tend to swear By It :bigthumb:
 

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Is the fuel gelling in the small filter under the floor or the one at the engine, or both?

Bottom line, with the 1025R small fuel filter that is under the left floor board, good luck on keeping this filter open in really cold temps, don't matter what you put in the fuel.

Even the one at the engine is kind of in the open so it may not get enough ambient heat from the engine.

Personally, if I was in really cold climates, I would move that small filter to an area where it would get ambient heat from the engine and also put something around the main filter housing so it would get ambient heat from the engine.

Heat is the solution!!!
 

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It’s as if your fuel wasn’t winterized to begin with. Around here some places put signs on the pump that the winter fuel will flow down to -10 deg F, sometimes -15 deg. I treat that fuel with the JD product which my people (GTT) tell me it is Stanadyne. I routinely run for extended periods below -10 deg and sometimes below -20. When it’s colder than that, I try not to go out!
Maybe the Howe’s product doesn’t protect as well as some of the others:dunno:
If you are not seeing trucks pulled over along the road all over, then it has to be more localized to where you are buying your fuel, or the treatment that you are
using.
Rest assured that a diesel engine should be able to run in any condition that New York can throw at it!
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Are you sure it's the fuel jelling and not some kind of contamination in your tank?
If the fuel was reaching it's cloud point, you could just warm the filter up and the paraffin will melt right off.
I don't suppose you could post a picture of what is on the filter element?
What temperatures are you experiencing this at?
I can't be sure of anything, but everything I see and experience tells me that the issue is paraffin wax clogging the first filter. I had this at 4F. There is visible separation, but the red ring is on the bottom. The tractor ran perfectly for about 20 minutes with a new filter.



Is the fuel gelling in the small filter under the floor or the one at the engine, or both?

Bottom line, with the 1025R small fuel filter that is under the left floor board, good luck on keeping this filter open in really cold temps, don't matter what you put in the fuel.

Even the one at the engine is kind of in the open so it may not get enough ambient heat from the engine.

Personally, if I was in really cold climates, I would move that small filter to an area where it would get ambient heat from the engine and also put something around the main filter housing so it would get ambient heat from the engine.

Heat is the solution!!!
I had a 1025R last winter, now I have a 2032R. The fuel filter is an automotive style spin on. It's much, much easier to change than the dinky little lawn mower filter under the 1 series. But also more expensive.

The tractor sits in a shelterlogic car tent. It keeps it dry and keeps the sun off, but it can't really be heated. Especially not in these temps. Also, once the filter is clogged with paraffin, that's it. It's toast.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Rest assured that a diesel engine should be able to run in any condition that New York can throw at it!
Well then, why isn't it?? Howe's a reputable top brand of treatment. Whether my diesel was summer or winter blend shouldn't matter since I treated it. But I bought it in December, and was told by the attendant that it was winter blend.

And yeah, I get it. Diesels should run in any temp. So again...why isn't it???
 

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Biodiesel: to me it sounds like you are getting fuel with a percentage of Biodiesel. I will never run any diesel engine in the winter for the very reason you are having. Try finding a source of non-biodiesel and I bet you will have much less frustration.
 

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Well then, why isn't it?? Howe's a reputable top brand of treatment. Whether my diesel was summer or winter blend shouldn't matter since I treated it. But I bought it in December, and was told by the attendant that it was winter blend.

And yeah, I get it. Diesels should run in any temp. So again...why isn't it???
Summer fuel (#2) treated with a couple ounces of fuel treatment isn’t the same a winter fuel blend that contains 10% or more of kerosene.
That article you linked might be the whole problem.
Howe’s might be a good product, it’s just that I have never used it.
You only have 2 variables...the fuel and the treatment. It’s time to try something different.
-10 deg F is not unreasonably cold for a diesel with the proper fuel.
Go to the local truck stop. It might be a cheap education on what’s going on.
 

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I will never run any diesel engine in the winter for the very reason you are having.
Ha! I wish it were that simple for me:mocking: not too many choices with gas powered equipment.

I had fuel gel up 1 time in 30 years...-37 deg F. There were trucks stalled everywhere. I was in a little Mitsubishi diesel pickup at a friends house, dumped a 2 1/2 gallon pail of hot water on the fuel filter, and it got me home!
 

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Discussion Starter #18
What can I do with the fuel I drain? Will the paraffin drain out with it, making it usable in the summer?
 

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What can I do with the fuel I drain? Will the paraffin drain out with it, making it usable in the summer?
Yes, it should be perfectly usable. You can use it in your cattle oiler too.:thumbup1gif:
 

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I was somewhat concerned about gelling when I bought my TDI.
It sits outside in all weather, and since the engine heater doesnt work so great anymore, it rarely even gets plugged in anymore either.

Its been through several sub zero temp nights and never a problem.
It also has ONLY had Stanadyne Performance as its fuel treatment at every single fill up, no matter the season. The reason for that is, when I first got it, that and Opti Lube were the two highest recommended on both the TDI forums I was on at the time, and I can buy the Stanadyne at the local Rural King for a good price, vs ordering the Opti.
Last Winter (or the one before?, darn CRS) we had a stretch where it was below zero for several days in a row, which isnt normal here. I remember seeing lots of guys posting about their diesel woes in Facebook for a few days after. My TDI had no such issues, except for the extended cranking in the cold, but thats normal.
This year we have already had single digit temps, and in a few days we will get the coldest temps yet.
I have zero concerns about my fuel now, after having gone quite some time now through most conditions, with nary a hiccup using what I do.
I do not always fill up at the same place, so fuel has always varied in quality, but that too hasnt seemed to be an issue.
The same thing goes in the 2025 at every fill up too, for all the same reasons I use it in the TDI, plus the fact that I already have it on the shelf.
Unknown if its related to the Stanadyne or not, but some time back there was a thread about the 1025/2025 starting rough. Mine doesnt do this unless its below 30, and even then only a slight hiccup at first, which seems to be unlike most others experience.

I know Howse is a well known name, but they say their treatment displaces the water, which leaves it up to your water separator to deal with.
There are two types, demulsifiers, which separate the water from the fuel, and emulsifiers, which 'dissolve' the water into the fuel where it its turned to steam in the combustion chamber.
If you have a lot of water in the fuel, the separation of that water could still be causing issues, as every time the tractor is started, the fuel is "mixed" again in the filter.
What bothers me about the Howse stuff is that they want you to double your treatment in the Winter. I dont think anyone else does this.
Stanadyne says theirs reduces Cold Filter Plug Point by "up to 25 degrees depending on base fuel used." There is no extra dose required for that.
There are lots of good additives out there, and Howse may be one, but the reason Ive stuck to Stanadyne is because they are the only ones that actually make diesel fuel injection systems too.
No matter who I was using though, if I had issues, Id switch to something else to find out if it was the issue.
Trouble is at this point, youll have to drain whats in there to make sure you are not getting any bad fuel in with the good.
 
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