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Discussion Starter #1
We have a nice shed on our property and I am using it to store some pallets and plywood left over from the wedding plus my trailer and 1025R implements. My SIL also stores some of his Amazon stuff in it. But it is a long way from the house (don't know what the previous owner was thinking) and has a couple of design flaws (8' wide barn doors for example - hard to get the trailer in and out). So we are going to have Pioneer Pole Barns build one for us. We are deciding between 30x30x10 and 30x40x10 and it will depend entirely on the price difference. The desire is to be able to store the trailer, the implements, the tractor, and the Suburban and still have room left for a decent sized shop.

I'm not a fanatic DIYer like some of you guys (lack of skill), so we'll pay to have the barn built and then I will do the wiring and lighting and any other interior touches we decide on. We are in the planning stages now, so I'm thinking about leveling the area myself (good excuse for a couple more implements), and my wife is thinking about me doing the concrete floor later on. I'm not thinking about that.

I have been doing a lot of research on the subject but would welcome any ideas/suggestions/warnings that you guys might have.
 

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Decide on what size you think you need then go up to the next size. Tis better to build the extra 10 feet now than to wish 5 years from now that you had gone bigger.
 

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Lay out and mark a 30x30 space then place the trailer and suburban inside, those two items alone will fill up some sq footage quickly. 30x30's are a fairly common size in my area (I'm sure they are everywhere). I have seen many of them built and within a year or two lean to's suddenly appear on the sides. Trailers and implements are the items I commonly see under the lean-to so I assume those items was consuming to much interior space and folks wanted them out of the way. It's easy to spend other people's money but I'm betting the common response in this thread will be "build bigger"
 

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You're getting a lot of good ideas here. About a year ago I had a 26' x 32' x 12' shop built. I was constrained by space so that was it. I hadn't planned on parking my Dodge 1 ton inside at all but I like to now and will do so as long as I don't need the space for a project. I did all my own internal work except for the concrete which I would suggest you do ASAP as working on gravel is the pits. That included electrical, plumbing, heating, lighting, insulation, and wall board hanging (OSB).

This thread documented the process and has a lot of pictures: http://www.greentractortalk.com/forums/home-workshop-projects/80674-new-shop-ag-building.html

I'm very happy with the building.
 

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and my wife is thinking about me doing the concrete floor later on. I'm not thinking about that.
A lot of good advice here already, go as big as your zoning, or wallet will allow. If there is a shread of thought in "me doing the concrete floor" yourself, don't. :laugh: Hire that part out. If it was just having it done, carry on. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks, guys

The price difference between the two sizes is only about $3K, so I'm going to talk the Mrs. into going with the 30x40. It will be worth it in the long run. I've finished two basements to include wiring, lighting, ducting, plumbing, drywall and paneling, so I can handle the interior. Note that I did not say anything about concrete. I have seen that done before (can't pass a construction site without stopping for a look) and have been looking at a few Youttube videos of smaller jobs, and I have decided that that is not for me.

Next step is to nail down the price and then sign the contract, and then get the permits from Prince William County.

Interesting side lights: the builder wants to pour the concrete after the building has been built, and will do everything except supply the stone for the base.
 

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The price difference between the two sizes is only about $3K, so I'm going to talk the Mrs. into going with the 30x40. It will be worth it in the long run. I've finished two basements to include wiring, lighting, ducting, plumbing, drywall and paneling, so I can handle the interior. Note that I did not say anything about concrete. I have seen that done before (can't pass a construction site without stopping for a look) and have been looking at a few Youttube videos of smaller jobs, and I have decided that that is not for me.

Next step is to nail down the price and then sign the contract, and then get the permits from Prince William County.

Interesting side lights: the builder wants to pour the concrete after the building has been built, and will do everything except supply the stone for the base.
As much as I know about concrete, the people the put down the concrete would have to do it from start to finish and that includes the stone or whatever else it needs. If they couldn't do the stone I'd be getting me a different batch of people to do all of it. That's all I know about concrete.
 

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As much as I know about concrete, the people the put down the concrete would have to do it from start to finish and that includes the stone or whatever else it needs. If they couldn't do the stone I'd be getting me a different batch of people to do all of it. That's all I know about concrete.
Had my shop poured last January. I hired a guy to complete the excavation and another to pour the concrete. These were two local, small town, contractors who work together often and were recommended by the builder.

The excavation involved adding and finish compacting 3/4" minus on top of the 1 1/2" I had previously added directly after the build in October. The pour included a 5+ inches of concrete with steel grid, and a short distance pumper.

This was my one and only experience with concrete work. It came out great, very happy with the job.

IMG_3570.JPG

IMG_3573.JPG
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks again

That's a great space, Marlin. How effective are those heaters I see up near the rafters? Heat is one of the things I'm going to have to decide on.

Levi, the builder will do all the work with regard to the concrete, including leveling the stone. They just won't buy the stone and have it in place.
 

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What ever size you decide on , it will be to small :laugh: If you can afford go for the 40' , it is cheaper now than doing it say in 5 yrs or regretting not going with the larger building.
 

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That's a great space, Marlin. How effective are those heaters I see up near the rafters? Heat is one of the things I'm going to have to decide on.

Levi, the builder will do all the work with regard to the concrete, including leveling the stone. They just won't buy the stone and have it in place.

I have the one 40,000 BTU propane heater, sized for the building and our mild climate. It's an Infrared Heater, requiring no electrical or venting. I've been very happy with it.
 

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That's a great space, Marlin. How effective are those heaters I see up near the rafters? Heat is one of the things I'm going to have to decide on.

Levi, the builder will do all the work with regard to the concrete, including leveling the stone. They just won't buy the stone and have it in place.
Oh yah, I could go with that. I was thinking you had to get it, level it, pack it and have it all done so they could come in and pour the concrete. I could do all that except make sure it was level. Just might not be to their liking.
 

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That's a great space, Marlin. How effective are those heaters I see up near the rafters? Heat is one of the things I'm going to have to decide on.

Levi, the builder will do all the work with regard to the concrete, including leveling the stone. They just won't buy the stone and have it in place.

drynoc ~ I just realized I didn't answer your original question regarding 'effectiveness'. When I bought the heater from Northern Tools it was the highest rated, around 90% efficient I think, but . . . they no longer state that in their ad so :unknown:.

https://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_5840_5840

I also added a ceiling fan which is used to move inside air year round.

https://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_200436485_200436485
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Great ideas

I'm getting a lot out of this, so thanks guys.

Marlin, I hadn't thought about propane heat. I'll keep that one in mind. The barn is going to be fairly near my propane tank anyway. I guess I could also use a grilling tank. A neighbor has those same fans in his Pioneer building, so I'll be going with those as well.

Gizmo, that is a nice garage, and I have looked through your thread before. But I gagged on that "I'll be putting in the concrete...." I won't be putting in the concrete.

I'm down to the last details on the barn I want to build so I hope to get it ironed out early this coming week and then move on with the plans and the permits.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I guess this counts as progress

Got it almost finalized. It's going to be 30x40x10, two 10x9 overhead garage doors on opposite sides of the building, one entry door, four windows, gutters but no eaves, roof vent, vapor barrier, 4" concrete floor. Obviously some of those decisions are financially determined - I would like to have eaves for example, but they are on the cost cutting floor. I'll pay the electric co-op to install a panel and electricity and then I'll do the rest of the electric. Pioneer will be the builder, and with permits and the like it will probably be next spring before it gets done. They advertise completing it in 3-5 days. Total cost around $25K.
 

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Scrap the gutters and get the eaves, just put a rock/stone perimeter around the building. I wish I had done that...I hate have the gutters, but I did get 12” overhangs.
 

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I am with Kenny on the overhang, without gutters.

I put decorative rock and brick border around my shop.

P7042089.JPG

I have no wash outs from the rain water coming off the roof. Building was erected in 2014.
 
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