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Discussion Starter #1
I have a Chevy 1500 and wondered about pulling a goose neck trailer with it. I currently have a flat rear hitch 7,000 GVW trailer that I tow fairly well but wondered if a gooseneck would actually tow better and be easier on the truck. I would like to have a cattle trailer. Oddly enough, lots of used goosenecks available but few regular hitch trailers unless they are totally junk.

The truck only has a 7,000 tow rating and I try to not exceed that. May have gone over once or twice, particularly when hauling rock but in general my loads are 5-7,000 lbs or less. If funds were available, I would trade trucks up to something larger but I don't see that happening right now.

Thanks for the comments in advance.

Treefarmer
 

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The gooseneck definitely will pull better and safer. However, you are severely limited to what you can handle with a 1/2 ton pickup. Provided you stay within the tow limits of the vehicle, I think you will be OK. Sway is virtually eliminated with the gooseneck. Be aware that the gooseneck hitch is much more expensive than a frame hitch receiver. Figure at least $500 for the install. B&W is the best brand. I recently upgraded to a 31ft gooseneck flatbed deckover dually trailer, but I have an F250, so can handle the extra tongue weight that the gooseneck trailer is capable of.

Dave
 

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The gooseneck definitely will pull better and safer. However, you are severely limited to what you can handle with a 1/2 ton pickup. Provided you stay within the tow limits of the vehicle, I think you will be OK. Sway is virtually eliminated with the gooseneck. Be aware that the gooseneck hitch is much more expensive than a frame hitch receiver. Figure at least $500 for the install. B&W is the best brand. I recently upgraded to a 31ft gooseneck flatbed deckover dually trailer, but I have an F250, so can handle the extra tongue weight that the gooseneck trailer is capable of.

Dave
I second what Dave said. I just added a B&W to my F250 and upgraded from a bp horse trailer to a 4 horse gooseneck. The gooseneck pulls much easier.

I did the B&W install myself in about 3 hours not rushing. I bought my kit from Leaf Springs, Helper Springs and Suspension Parts | SD Truck Springs
 

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I plan on installing a gooseneck ball in my 1/2-ton Tundra. It's a much more stable towing system and, IMO, is also a lot easier for backing up. As with any trailer, you just need to watch your weights and pay attention to your loading.
 

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Like the others, I much prefer gooseneck trailers. My 24' gooseneck pulls easier and rides better than a 16' bumper pull.

My concern is your 7,000 lb weight limit. My flatbed trailer weighs a little over 4,000 lbs empty and my aluminum horse trailer is about 6,000 lbs empty. A lot of the used trailers you see are going to be heavy, especially the older steel stock trailers. You could easily burn half or more of your load capacity just on the empty rig.

The other concern is tongue weight. Goosenecks seem to run about 20% tongue weight compared to the 10% or so you have on a bumper style hitch.
 

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If my 30 year old F150 can handle a gooseneck, so can your Chevy! I'll take a gooseneck over a bumper-pull any day and for darn near any load. B&W is a pretty nice hitch if you have the cash. Curt makes a cheaper fold down ball which is good too. With either of these hitches, the truck is going to be the weak link... And not just because it's a Chevy! :mocking: I don't think I have ever seen a gooseneck hitch rated for less than 18,000 pounds.

The one in my Ford is an old chunk of plate with a ball and two D-rings welded to it and bolted thru the box to the frame. Not pretty, but it works... kinda like the rest of the truck. I just toss a pair of 4x4's in the bed when I have to haul drywall or plywood.
 

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To have only a 7000# tow rating you must have a smaller engine, lighter transmission, not much if any axillary transmission cooler, and small brakes and tires compared to a truck with a higher tow rating. SON's '06 F-150 SuperCab had a gcwr of 16,000#, so almost 10,000# trailer weight. The gooseneck trailer has lots of extra steel right over your rear axle eating up your rear axle load capacity. Sounds like you want to waste a lot of money to end up pulling less cargo than you can right now. It's REAL easy to overload gooseneck trailers too. Even with 3/4 and one ton single rear wheel trucks.

Save the money from upgrading trailers and getting the gooseneck hitch and buy a bigger tow vehicle when you can afford it.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for the comments

Thanks to all for the comments. They are interesting and helpful and somewhat confirm what I was thinking. Now, if someone is looking to trade their 250 or 2500 for a 2006 Chevy 1500 4 x 4 that would be perfect. The 4 x 4 is more important than the towing capacity so, no I won't go for a 2500 two wheel drive.

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Probably a good idea to upgrade your tow vehicle. There is a fine line between "can" and "should" when it comes to towing, and it is a line that is very easy to cross. Also especially easy with a gooseneck because they tow so nicely.

:kidw_truck_smiley:

Still, if you are careful with how much weight you try to haul, and the manner of how you go about doing it, a 1/2 ton can work: 3000 pounds of trailer + 4000 pounds of tractor = only 7000 pounds total. To put that into perspective, any new 3series CUT and an attachment or two should be at or under 4000 pounds if I'm not mistaken.
 

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Agreed

Probably a good idea to upgrade your tow vehicle. There is a fine line between "can" and "should" when it comes to towing, and it is a line that is very easy to cross. Also especially easy with a gooseneck because they tow so nicely.

:kidw_truck_smiley:

Still, if you are careful with how much weight you try to haul, and the manner of how you go about doing it, a 1/2 ton can work: 3000 pounds of trailer + 4000 pounds of tractor = only 7000 pounds total. To put that into perspective, any new 3series CUT and an attachment or two should be at or under 4000 pounds if I'm not mistaken.
No question a bigger truck would be better. I'm ok with my current trailer 2000 lbs empty and moving the 790. I've done it enough to know the load point and how the truck handles the load. A cattle trailer would be nice to haul 5-7 calves or the occasional cull cow but I'm not looking to tow heavy loads on a regular basis with my current truck. We'll see, maybe I'll hit the lottery and buy a three quarter ton, diesel rig! Odds are only 300 million or so, right?

Treefarmer
 
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