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My son is in the 4H Bee Club this year. We purchased a hive earlier this year and have spent some of our many rainy weekends assembling and painting it. Today we picked up a nuc and set up the hive. We also picked up a second hive to assemble. He is on a list of local 4H kids to get a swarm that is collected by the leaders of the bee club. How many beekeepers are on here? There is so much to know about keeping bees that I can’t imagine we would try it without the support of his club.
 

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I'm a beekeeper. :thumbup1gif:
 

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My wife took it up last year, and our bees have survived for over a year now. They made an unbelievable difference in the apple tree output last year, and we had some honey after just a few months. I told her when she started that I didn't want to be a beekeeper, but I have learned quite a bit. :laugh:
 

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Beekeeper here too. Nothing like home grown honey. :bigthumb:
 

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We have a couple of beekeepers in the neighborhood. The local farm stand at the apple orchard usually has some honey for sale later in the season.

Haven't seen many bees around lately though and the dandelions are in full bloom. I'm wondering if the cold & wet weather is keeping them in the hives?
 

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My wife has kept bees for about 10 years now, so I am an apprentice keeper. Someone mentioned skunks and fencing, try Premier One, they have a few options. We got the one for bears as we have some black bears around, and had two attacks in the past, none since the fence went up. Solar powered and electrified. Worth it.
 

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My son is in the 4H Bee Club this year. We purchased a hive earlier this year and have spent some of our many rainy weekends assembling and painting it. Today we picked up a nuc and set up the hive. We also picked up a second hive to assemble. He is on a list of local 4H kids to get a swarm that is collected by the leaders of the bee club. How many beekeepers are on here? There is so much to know about keeping bees that I can’t imagine we would try it without the support of his club.
I think this adventure you are on with your son is a fantastic activity for the both of you. I hope he's getting great advice fro the Bee club leaders, just in case you may want to confirm a few of the following points. I am not a keeper, but I also appreciate the effort it takes to keep the hives going. It is farming and it is work.

-- If there's any kind of production ag land near by, it would be worth while to learn if theres a registry of hives that you can get listed. In our area neighboring farmers are generally very good about talking with acreage owners to see if there are hives they are unaware of in the area. I have known them to alter their pesticide applications in attempts of lessening its impact on the hive. At minimum, I would establish contact with the all custom pesticide applicators and/or chemical retailers that you can find and let them know you have bees and they may do things to accommodate you or point you in the right directions.

-- Your state may have laws protecting your bees, but you have to be proactive with it. In , Iowa we have “Pesticide/Bee Rule” of the Iowa Administrative Code Chapter 21-45.31(206). The Rule reads:“45.31(1) Owners of apiaries, in order to protect their bees from pesticide applications, shall register the location of their apiaries with the state apiarist. Registration shall be on forms provided by the department. The registration expires December 31 each year and may be renewed the following year.
45.31(2) Between 8 a.m. and 6 p.m., a commercial applicator shall not apply to blooming crops pesticides labeled as toxic to bees when the commercial applicator is located within one mile of a registered apiary.; A commercial applicator shall be responsible for maintaining the one-mile distance from apiaries that are registered and listed on the sensitive crop registry on the first day of each month.

One site that is reference https://beecheck.org

All that said, my neighbors had 3 hives last summer, crazy productive, lots of friendly plants around, come October 2018, POOF! They up and left (all 3 of them) each leaving a hive full of honey sitting.

Best of luck!
 

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I think this adventure you are on with your son is a fantastic activity for the both of you. I hope he's getting great advice fro the Bee club leaders, just in case you may want to confirm a few of the following points. I am not a keeper, but I also appreciate the effort it takes to keep the hives going. It is farming and it is work.

-- If there's any kind of production ag land near by, it would be worth while to learn if theres a registry of hives that you can get listed. In our area neighboring farmers are generally very good about talking with acreage owners to see if there are hives they are unaware of in the area. I have known them to alter their pesticide applications in attempts of lessening its impact on the hive. At minimum, I would establish contact with the all custom pesticide applicators and/or chemical retailers that you can find and let them know you have bees and they may do things to accommodate you or point you in the right directions.

-- Your state may have laws protecting your bees, but you have to be proactive with it. In , Iowa we have “Pesticide/Bee Rule” of the Iowa Administrative Code Chapter 21-45.31(206). The Rule reads:“45.31(1) Owners of apiaries, in order to protect their bees from pesticide applications, shall register the location of their apiaries with the state apiarist. Registration shall be on forms provided by the department. The registration expires December 31 each year and may be renewed the following year.
45.31(2) Between 8 a.m. and 6 p.m., a commercial applicator shall not apply to blooming crops pesticides labeled as toxic to bees when the commercial applicator is located within one mile of a registered apiary.; A commercial applicator shall be responsible for maintaining the one-mile distance from apiaries that are registered and listed on the sensitive crop registry on the first day of each month.

One site that is reference https://beecheck.org

All that said, my neighbors had 3 hives last summer, crazy productive, lots of friendly plants around, come October 2018, POOF! They up and left (all 3 of them) each leaving a hive full of honey sitting.

Best of luck!
There is a website, believe it’s called Driftwatch, where we can register our hives. We are surrounded by farm fields, the same same farmer owns all of it so we are going to talk to him about our bees. The bees will sometimes swarm where they leave the hive in search of a new place to stay. There are some signs to look for signaling the bees are preparing to swarm. You can’t stop them from doing so but you can catch the queen and move her to a different hive and the other bees may follow. Not 100% sure on that, still trying to learn with my son.
 

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Between 8 a.m. and 6 p.m., a commercial applicator shall not apply to blooming crops pesticides labeled as toxic to bees when the commercial applicator is located within one mile of a registered apiary.; A commercial applicator shall be responsible for maintaining the one-mile distance from apiaries that are registered and listed on the sensitive crop registry on the first day of each month.

All that said, my neighbors had 3 hives last summer, crazy productive, lots of friendly plants around, come October 2018, POOF! They up and left (all 3 of them) each leaving a hive full of honey sitting.

Best of luck!
that's the best pesticide law I've seen, wish all states would adopt it. as to the bees leaving ask your neighbor if they treated for mites, no bees left is the normal clue that they died from mites.
 
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