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Discussion Starter #1
I do, and I'm kind partial to it too. Cast Iron hanging tree. Out door Cook Station. I love cooking probably more than my wife does, but I hate cleaning up afterwards unless it's my Cast cookware, then I and only I get to take care of them.

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Corndog Hater
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Always hear and read about how great cast iron is. As the main chef in this house, it's on my list to get. Is that Apple pie? It looks delicious


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Whoa, you have a ton. Literally.

We only have a few pieces. Trying to build a collection of good USA new and vintage.
One of the best pieces we have though is the Lodge griddle plate.
Man, that thing is awesome for grilled cheese, pancakes, eggs, whatever.

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Discussion Starter #6
Apple Pie is great out of the Cast skillet. It bakes perfectly
The other picture is a large Cinnabon made by buying cinnamon rolls in a can from store, place one in the middle of the skillet and then unroll the second roll around the first connecting them at the ends. Continue to do so with 2 cans of rolls which ends up making one large cinnamon roll. Bake in oven at 350 for approximately 25 minutes or until brown. Butter and frost for a great looking snack.

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Pizza anyone? Taters and onions?
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One of my favorite pieces. Lid doubles for a skillet. (How do you like my refurbished utility chair? It was in pretty bad shape when I got it from the antique store for $15. My wife did the upholstery work)

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Doing a Pot Roast in the garage Dutch Oven style. (Please don't lecture me about fumes and fire danger being too close to the Tractor gas tank etc., It's actually farther away from the cooking area than it looks and besides, I'm a big boy, I don't need to be schooled about how to cook safely, I went through all that on another site and before it was over it turned ugly as people started arguing over spontaneous combustion of space aliens and Area 51)

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Corndog Hater
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Wow awesome, that all looks so good. My wife's grandmother passed a couple years ago and had a lot of cast iron. We are still going through the house (obviously not in a hurry). We were going to ask if we could have a few pieces. We are headed up there in the near future…


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GTT's Pilot in Command (PIC)
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Farmgirl needs to see this thread.

I too love my cast iron cookware! :thumbup1gif: And the thread caught my eye easily!

I don't know why they think they can "improve" on things that can last for generations, and just get better, if properly cared for. I guess too many today, (if they CAN cook), want to throw it in the dishwasher. But I think cooking from scratch has become a dying art.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
i have 2 skillets, a griddle and a bacon press.

What type of oil does everyone use to season their cast iron?
Crisco is my choice.

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I love cast iron. We have two 12" dutch ovens, seven 8" skillets with 3 different sizes, one 10" skillet and I have a 6" skillet I bought during my Boy Scout days in the mid 60's. Everyone else had the flimsy Scout mess kits which were lighter but near as durable or usable as my skillet.

We use the dutch ovens for cobblers mainly but have cooked almost everything it them.

Ours are seasoned with Crisco as well.
 

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Great subject for a thread!

We're just "re-learning" the benefits of cast iron too. My mother had a fry-pan she used for most everything, not sure who took it after she passed. Then recently, my cousin who seems to know a lot about vintage cast iron (made in USA) turned me onto a couple a skillets his antique dealer friend had for sale. We bought them, intending to give them to our kids, but they didn't want any part of that. So wife and I have been experimenting a little at a time. Get them really hot, put a steak or lambchops in them to brown, then finish them off in the oven for about 5 - 10 minutes, worked great for me.

A little side-track, we've been looking at an induction cook-top, and I hear that cast iron works great on them. I haven't tried it yet, but I may be looking out for more CI pieces.

For seasoning, I tried my wood burning fireplace insert. Got the fire really hot, probably about 700F, greased up the pan and placed inside. Got a really nice black seasoning in a few minutes. I never tried Crisco, thanks for the tip, I'll try that next time.

What do you use for cleaning? I been using salt. Any better ideas?
 

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Great subject for a thread!

We're just "re-learning" the benefits of cast iron too. My mother had a fry-pan she used for most everything, not sure who took it after she passed. Then recently, my cousin who seems to know a lot about vintage cast iron (made in USA) turned me onto a couple a skillets his antique dealer friend had for sale. We bought them, intending to give them to our kids, but they didn't want any part of that. So wife and I have been experimenting a little at a time. Get them really hot, put a steak or lambchops in them to brown, then finish them off in the oven for about 5 - 10 minutes, worked great for me.

A little side-track, we've been looking at an induction cook-top, and I hear that cast iron works great on them. I haven't tried it yet, but I may be looking out for more CI pieces.

For seasoning, I tried my wood burning fireplace insert. Got the fire really hot, probably about 700F, greased up the pan and placed inside. Got a really nice black seasoning in a few minutes. I never tried Crisco, thanks for the tip, I'll try that next time.

What do you use for cleaning? I been using salt. Any better ideas?
I use course salt as well when I need to. Most of the time I find that hot water and a metal spatula work well.


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I have a fairly large collection of cast iron cookware but it mostly only gets used with the camper now. When I had my own place I used it all the time but the girl doesn't like using it. (I love her anyway!)

A couple of years back I somehow got trapped amongst a group of women who were discussing their Thanksgiving plans and a couple of them were complaining about the lack of cooking space in their kitchens. They couldn't figure out how to cook everything and have it all done at roughly the same time. They got to discussing how to make use of their cast iron dutch ovens for things like making gravy and such. They all seemed flumoxed when I suggested that they use the dutch ovens for baking things in. Apparently they gone through all their cooking shows and books but no one had ever explained to them that it's called a "Dutch Oven" because the Dutch used them at one point as their ovens. :laugh:

I suppose the "modern" thing to do is use them to make soups and stews in them but they do work very well for baking in too!
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I seldom have to "Scrub" my pan/skillets but when I do, it's with salt and a rag.
Most the time a good rinsing with my hand is all that's needed. I apply a light coat of oil after each use and hang them up, but then rinse and wipe before the next use just to get any dust off the item.
The reason food sticks is usually caused from the food being removed before it is cook well enough to release from the pan. Eggs are a prime example, Potatoes too. Btw, Potatoes wont stick near as bad if you soak them over night before needed. That releases the starch and is that milky stuff in the bottom of your soak bowl/pan. Dry the potatoes before cooking in Crisco and cook covered on low heat. Try it, you'll like it.
 

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GTT's Pilot in Command (PIC)
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I use lard to season mine. Worked for my grandmother, and since one of my skillets was hers, I don't think that I can improve on that. In a pinch, I'd use Crisco or peanut oil, since I often set them back on the stove or in the oven, and I want a high smoke/burn temp for seasoning.
 

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I have 2 skillets, a griddle and a bacon press.

What type of oil does everyone use to season their cast iron?
We've always used bacon grease. Don't much care for the made out of country cast iron. We only have one that is made somewhere else. It cooks ok but it's not flat on the bottom and I hate that. I don't even know where we got it. I'll only use our made in America cast iron. :usa
 

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I love my Lodge. I buy a piece anytime I find a great deal. My wife keeps trying to use soap though, this summer I plan to try and do a full reseason and will probably throw some other non-lodge in and see if I can get rid of the sticky nasty glaze that keeps coming out in food. Otherwise I will have to replace with only Lodge.
 

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I have 2 skillets, a griddle and a bacon press.

What type of oil does everyone use to season their cast iron?
Bacon oil.:yahoo:

Fry up a pound 3-4 strips at a time. Drain excess, toss in the oven at 400 for a couple hours.

From there, just keep using the steel spatula to scrape clean, wipe down with soapy rag, rinse, dry, done.

No need to soak clean or any other nonsense. It's Iron, treat it like what it is. Scrape gunk flush in the pores until they polymerize and become bonded carbons. ;)
 
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