Green Tractor Talk banner

1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Administrator
Joined
·
20,350 Posts
Practice practice practice. :good2:

Hopefully you have a good buddy who can weld who will come over and give you some tips. Learning to weld is difficult without some help from a person that knows how to do it.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
7,909 Posts
Found a like new miller stick ac/dc thunderbolt on craiglist for $250:bigthumb: I have 100 amps 220v plug,helmet,rods and lots of scrap steel Next week i will start welding For now i just watch videos/read about welding:cheers:
Sounds like you got quite a score there! Be careful working with old rods through. They may be damp and give you some trouble that you don't need as a beginner. Maybe go out and buy some 10# tubes of Hobart 6011 and 7018 in 1/8" diameter for practice.

Here's a link to some welding videos....

https://www.youtube.com/user/weldingtipsandtricks

He's got lot's of great advice that will get you off to a good start.

When I started welding the only advice I got was, "Turn-up the heat and bury the rod." Seemed to work pretty good at that time.

Have fun!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
Maybe try some 6013's as well. They will not stick as bad as the 7018. Start the arc like striking a match.. Keep you rods clean and dry... maybe invest in a rod storage tube...
Use clean metal... no paint or rust... don't weld galvanized metals without a breathing filter device.. Practice ... practice ..... practice.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
4,884 Posts
As someone that was in your shoes not but 6 months ago - if you have one in your area, check with a local VoTech school and see if they offer welding as an Adult Ed course. I went 1 night/week for 6 weeks and it was a very good $450 investment IMO. I'm sure I could have learned this stuff elsewhere but...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
271 Posts
As someone that was in your shoes not but 6 months ago - if you have one in your area, check with a local VoTech school and see if they offer welding as an Adult Ed course. I went 1 night/week for 6 weeks and it was a very good $450 investment IMO. I'm sure I could have learned this stuff elsewhere but...
This is on my to-do list. I'm not even getting the equipment until I can take a class. I figured it's well worth the investment of time and money to learn from a pro. Plus, you'll know what equipment might fit your needs best and how to take care of them. :thumbup1gif:
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
4,884 Posts
This is on my to-do list. I'm not even getting the equipment until I can take a class. I figured it's well worth the investment of time and money to learn from a pro. Plus, you'll know what equipment might fit your needs best and how to take care of them. :thumbup1gif:
Yup. That was my thought process too. Plus, you get 30+ hours of practice welding using all their equipment and materials. That's a LOT of welding rods and scrap steel. :laugh:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
271 Posts
Good point on materials! Didn't even think of that. Hmm, wonder if they let you bring in projects to build/work on... I want to build a bolt on blade and a rake for the BH. Best not get too far off OP topic...:laugh:
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
17,250 Posts
Congrats on the new equipment, sounds like you got a great deal!
 

·
Senior GTT Super Slacker
Joined
·
36,021 Posts
Good luck with it danmorea. :thumbup1gif:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
740 Posts
YouTube is great. I think someone already mentioned the "Welding tips and tricks" channel. Just remember that these guys are pros and have been doing it for a loooooong time. They will make it look easy. It is not. A good welder is a highly skilled and highly trained individual. Most go to school for several years to perfect their craft and hone their skills. Don't be discouraged if you can't get it to look like a neat stack of dimes on your first try! Even better than watching videos is to have someone with experiance come over and watch over your shoulder to give you pointers. Slow down and take your time. Remember, welding is considered an art.

Safety first! Be careful welding indoors (toxic fume buildup), near flammable materials (like the gas cans or the walls of your garage), near moisture/puddles (electrocution), on greasy/dirty equipment (fire), and on anything that did or could have held a flamable substance (lost a friend to an explosion when he cut into an old 55 gallon drum). If you are going to weld on a vehicle with any sort of electronics sofisticated enough to need a battery, you need to disconnect the battery to prevent damage to the electrical systems. If you are even slightly worried by what you are welding on catching fire, have someone standing by with a dry-chemical fire extinguisher and NOT a bucket of water! And of course, always wear the correct protective gear because you too are flammable.

The best advise I can give is to practice a lot; find what rods, amperages, fit-ups, positions, etc work best for you. Most importantly, don't weld for other people until you are consistently producing quality welds that can hold up to abuse. I don't mean to scare you but you can be held liable for damage caused by weld failure.

Good luck!:thumbup1gif:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,786 Posts
Good point on materials! Didn't even think of that. Hmm, wonder if they let you bring in projects to build/work on... I want to build a bolt on blade and a rake for the BH. Best not get too far off OP topic...:laugh:
I'm sure they wouldn't have a problem with it. most likely there would be a "project" that would be due at the end of the class anyway. Might as well build something useful.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
523 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
YouTube is great. I think someone already mentioned the "Welding tips and tricks" channel. Just remember that these guys are pros and have been doing it for a loooooong time. They will make it look easy. It is not. A good welder is a highly skilled and highly trained individual. Most go to school for several years to perfect their craft and hone their skills. Don't be discouraged if you can't get it to look like a neat stack of dimes on your first try! Even better than watching videos is to have someone with experiance come over and watch over your shoulder to give you pointers. Slow down and take your time. Remember, welding is considered an art.

Safety first! Be careful welding indoors (toxic fume buildup), near flammable materials (like the gas cans or the walls of your garage), near moisture/puddles (electrocution), on greasy/dirty equipment (fire), and on anything that did or could have held a flamable substance (lost a friend to an explosion when he cut into an old 55 gallon drum). If you are going to weld on a vehicle with any sort of electronics sofisticated enough to need a battery, you need to disconnect the battery to prevent damage to the electrical systems. If you are even slightly worried by what you are welding on catching fire, have someone standing by with a dry-chemical fire extinguisher and NOT a bucket of water! And of course, always wear the correct protective gear because you too are flammable.

The best advise I can give is to practice a lot; find what rods, amperages, fit-ups, positions, etc work best for you. Most importantly, don't weld for other people until you are consistently producing quality welds that can hold up to abuse. I don't mean to scare you but you can be held liable for damage caused by weld failure.

Good luck!:thumbup1gif:
The only place were i have power 100 amps 220v is an outdoor 20x40 concrete pad Back in the day it was a a place were a large travel camper was kept In my barn i only have 40amps 220v -10/3 uf wire For 40 amps price for all materials / i did the work was $2000 I thought back than that would be nice 50amps that would cost $4000 I do not want to know what would cost this days 100 amp 220v :flag_of_truce:
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
4,884 Posts
Good point on materials! Didn't even think of that. Hmm, wonder if they let you bring in projects to build/work on... I want to build a bolt on blade and a rake for the BH. Best not get too far off OP topic...:laugh:

They did allow (encouraged even!) people to bring in their own projects. Those of us that were in the class are trying to get the adult ed program to run an "open shop" in the fall where we could use their facilities one night a week for a flat fee. They do it for their carpentry program. Guys bring in their own materials and build furniture and what not using their equipment. Just having access to their open work space, the shears, plasma cutters, etc.. would make doing projects really nice.
 

·
Old Pa-pa
Joined
·
11,403 Posts
Found a like new miller stick ac/dc thunderbolt on craiglist for $250:bigthumb: I have 100 amps 220v plug,helmet,rods and lots of scrap steel Next week i will start welding For now i just watch videos/read about welding:cheers:
It's a great hobby, started welding and building stuff at 15.
You will learn and improve as time goes by.
Great vids on welding, some here on GTT.
Oh, auto darkening lens for helmet, best thing since sliced bread!
BE CAREFUL NOT TO GET A FLASH, lots of newbies have that happen.
Keep your arms covered and also neck area, the high intensity UV light will
give you a "burn".

Good luck and patience.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,072 Posts
Sounds like a good buy dan. I am in the same position you are. I inherited a 115v mig welder after my dad passed away and have no idea how to do anything with it after plugging it up:laugh: I have been watching a few videos to pick up some tips as I have a project that I need to work on asap.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
980 Posts
Somebody posted this Welding Tips and Tricks - TIG, MIG, Stick and a pantload of other info link a while back. I signed up and get a video about every week. You can learn a heck of a lot from Jody no mater what your skill level. A large library of past episodes with a wide variety of info. Like anything the more often you do it the better you get. Be safe.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
365 Posts
Some great information has been posted here. I am pretty new to welding myself, so I am going to post my findings as well.
I got so much better at striking an arc with my stick welder after I bought an auto darkening helmet. I do not even use the old school helmet anymore.

As others have mentioned, welding tips and tricks is a great resource, and has some excellent videos. Join their website.
I also watched quite a few of chucke2009 YouTube videos myself and I found his "teach yourself stick welding" very beneficial when I was trying to learn.

You have a great welder and you got it ant an excellent price. Enjoy, and please keep us updated as you go along.

Jeff
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,965 Posts
Did you get rods with this welder? If so, what are they?

I tend to have my habitat friends asking me for crash courses in welding and I tell all of them to take an intro class at a tech school. I had to take an elective when I got my AAS in CNC, so I took "cutting processes" so I could play with the schools plasma cam table (turned out to be a wise move) before attempting to build my own plasma table. That one course got me full access to all the equipment in the weld shop. So they had high end MIG, TIG, torches, plasma, sheers, brakes, bandsaws, belt grinders, and even a sand blasting cabinet. Not to mention, a big pile of steel to use at will!

I happen to have some really nice gear myself (after decades of saving at first, and then trading up when the deals came around), but school has that stuff right there for you to play with. You can find out if this is a hobby you want to invest in, or maybe you'll discover you just want a basic welder. I probably would've gotten my first 250A MIG instead of one of my project cars had I known what I was missing by using my 130A 120v MIG - and that thing was a big investment for me at the time too.

Auto hood is worth the investment, even if you just stick broken farm stuff together a couple times a year. It's a major improvement over the old fixed glass lenses. I'd liken it to trying to thread a needle with your eyes closed, and you can only open them when you touch the thread to the side of the needle and if you miss you have to close your eyes again and start over. It's a quantum leap going to instant-on auto darkening hoods. You can watch what your doing the whole time and not have things move when you flip your hood down and then try to start an arc. I would never go back to a manual hood.
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top