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Discussion Starter #1
Snapped this pic up the road from our house tonight, when my daughter and I went out for a ride on the 50's
 

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Ironic you posted a picture of them on an old barn. There is an old barn near us and we see the vultures on it's roof peak every year.

They have been back several weeks

One year a couple were "dancing" on the peak wings spread wide. Maybe courting a female vulture?

We also see bunches of them in the fall as they migrate south. They will clean up a dead deer in two days.
 

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okay...what kind of 50's were you riding....?


:munch:


nice barn pic:good2:
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
okay...what kind of 50's were you riding....?





nice barn pic
I roll around on a bone stock '12 CRF50f, and she rolls around on an '06 LTZ-50 4 stroke. She's been asking lately about learning to ride the CRF. She's 5 and rides that little Suzuki like she stole it. Just loves it. We race around the yard all the time.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Ironic you posted a picture of them on an old barn. There is an old barn near us and we see the vultures on it's roof peak every year.

They have been back several weeks

One year a couple were "dancing" on the peak wings spread wide. Maybe courting a female vulture?

We also see bunches of them in the fall as they migrate south. They will clean up a dead deer in two days.
They love some road kill!
I'll be mowing the lawn not knowing they are flying overhead until they block the sun for a split second, casting a shadow over me.
 

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That pic has Alfred Hitchcock wrote all over it.
 

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We call them Turkey Buzzards around here - same thing I think. They arrive within the same few days every year toward the end of March.

They are a pain on the roadside with road kills - they wait until the last second to take flight - and they are slow. I know of a couple people who have whacked one - makes for quite a mess of the grill or windshield.

But as with everything else in nature they provide a need - for them it’s cleaning up carrion.
 

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We call them Turkey Buzzards around here - same thing I think. They arrive within the same few days every year toward the end of March.

They are a pain on the roadside with road kills - they wait until the last second to take flight - and they are slow. I know of a couple people who have whacked one - makes for quite a mess of the grill or windshield.

But as with everything else in nature they provide a need - for them it’s cleaning up carrion.
Yup, same thing, Vultures/Buzzards. They're ornery for sure.

That pic has Alfred Hitchcock wrote all over it.
That's exactly the name I was trying to think of when we came across all of them. Just couldn't remember it. His name and that pic are definitely familiar!
 

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That pic has Alfred Hitchcock wrote all over it.
:good2:

Stephen King could probably have a field day with it as well.
 

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They hang around our farm. They'll eat a dead skunk before it's cold. We can usually get pretty close to them. I think they know who's feeding them.
 

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I was told there is a difference between vultures and buzzards :dunno:, but never bothered to research it, supposedly buzzards are bigger and range is a lot further west :dunno:
 

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I don't know about all that. Around here Turkey Vulture, and Turkey Buzzard are used interchangeably. One in the same from what I've always known.
Turkey vulture - Wikipedia

No matter what you call them, they are FUGLY!
 

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Turkey Buzzard vs. Black Vulture

When I was a kid, all we had were Turkey Buzzards. They are pretty timid, tend to be good citizens and just clean up whatever is lying around dead.

About 30 years ago we started seeing Black Vultures. They are similar size but way, way different birds. They not only eat carrion but will attack living animals. We've lost a few calves and at least one cow to them because they were slow to get up after birth. They are a nasty, aggressive bird and are slowly moving the turkey buzzards out.

Unfortunately both are protected species. You can apply for a control permit from US Fish and Wildlife. A friend of mine applied and got a permit. . . after 7 months. He can only shoot a black vulture with a shotgun loaded with non toxic shot. No rifles, no pistols, no lead shot so he's limited to getting within about 30 yards or so to take it out.

My suggestion was to shoot them with a .22 and then shoot them again with his shotgun loaded with non toxic shot but he's on a main road and figured someone would report him. . .

Treefarmer
 

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50 miles north of San Francisco they're here all year long.
In the Redwoods? Montgomery Woods SNR, a little farther north of that, is gorgeous.
Same here all year, just never seen them perched all together like that. Are they as FUGLY in CA, as they are in IL?
 

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I've never thought about them being migratory, as they are around my area year 'round. The Black headed variety is also prevalent in Texas, but much farther south than I am. Protected or not, if I had to deal with the black variety, I'd be thinning out the population!

I have seen the local flocks take a full grown deer (already deceased) to bones in a couple of hours, or less. But the things have to wait 3-5 days before they consume a dead wild hog. Dang hog hide is so thick that it has to begin breaking down before even the buzzards can begin to feast on it.
 

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I've never thought about them being migratory, as they are around my area year 'round. The Black headed variety is also prevalent in Texas, but much farther south than I am. Protected or not, if I had to deal with the black variety, I'd be thinning out the population!

I have seen the local flocks take a full grown deer (already deceased) to bones in a couple of hours, or less. But the things have to wait 3-5 days before they consume a dead wild hog. Dang hog hide is so thick that it has to begin breaking down before even the buzzards can begin to feast on it.
A little off topic, but I think an interesting story. I used to play in a bluegrass band with an ex Vietnam chopper pilot. He told the story of spotting a huge wild boar, which he dispatched with his M16. He said the guy with him tried to cut it's throat, but he was unable to do it because the thing was so tough. They tied it to the rail of the chopper, and took off for a montagnard village close by. He said it was so heavy, it surprised him...and it caused a bit of difficulty in keeping the chopper steady. He said they sat down in the village, and the villagers had the thing strung up and dressed out by the time the chopper blades stopped rotating (an exaggeration, I know, but makes a good story).
 

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We live on a fairly large lake in central Minnesota and have a resident flock of 30 or so. In their defense, as ugly as they are, we rarely see (or smell) dead fish around the edges of the lake. The turkey vultures hang around the downwind side of the lake and let any floating fish come to them. It doesn't seem that they like swimming but prefer to keep their feet dry and reach for a floating fish with their beak. We see them in our yard regularly and they only leave a few bones to mulch with the JD.

The raptor activity around a lake is pretty fascinating with the bald eagles swooping and picking up surface type fish, the ospreys actually diving into the water to get deeper fish (they come up and, taking wing, shake off the water like a dog), and the vultures hanging around the edges picking up the scraps. Once in a while we see a bald eagle floating on the water like a duck having "bit off more than he can chew" with a large fish in tow-then actually swimming using its wings toward shallow water. They haven't Michael Phelps graceful butterfly stroke.
 
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