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I'm in the process of purchasing a 1026R and I am trying to figure out the best way to regularly grade my gravel laneway that is about half a mile long to get rid of pot holes, etc. I'm debating between:
- a box blade,
- a drag scraper,
- a rear blade,
- or a front blade.

Any recommendations or insights? Any particular brands or pieces of equipment to recommend?

Finally, will the 1026R be powerful enough?
 

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Welcome to DT!

A box blade or a "land plane" would be the best solution. Check this link out: Frontier LP10 Series
 

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Another welcome to the DT fun KT!

Finally, will the 1026R be powerful enough?
Kenny steered you right on the proper equipment.

But, I will add that the 1026R will do the job just fine. Do not over size the box blade though. I think Deere recommends a 48".:good2: A 60" will work for the loose gravel but in dirt work it will be a bit much with a full cut and rippers.
 

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WELCOME TO DT KT

As Randy stated,don't oversize if you opt for a boxblade. A 48" will work just fine with that machine. Anything bigger, you'll be disappointed.

I am trying to figure out the best way to regularly grade my gravel laneway that is about half a mile long to get rid of pot holes
IMHO,the box blade will work the best. I use one for this exact task. When it comes to "repairing" potholes,digging them up is the best way to get rid of them,and that is where the rippers on the box blade come into play. This is my first full year using it on our gravel lane which is 3/10 of a mile,and it has performed beyond my expectations.:thumbup1gif:


Greg
 

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I had a 2305 with a 48" Frontier Boxblade. My driveway is not long but it is mostly clay and needs constant attention in the spring. the boxblade works great. I also had a 54 front blade on also and that makes a great combination. Goodluck

VP
 

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In my opinion, a drag scraper will be the best for a gravel lane. I made my own land plane/grader which also works very good with gravel.
I also use a rear blade so I can scrap the sides back toward the middle.

View attachment 4596

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Uceod816nck

The advantage of the longer plane is you will eliminate ripples. The box blade, front blade and rear blade are affected by the tractor as it goes up and down through low spots. I now use my 2210 which has more power and traction than the 455. The hydraulic lift is handy when the gravel gets too deep.

Works for me,
GotDeeres
 

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I am going to respectfully disagree with the above opinions that a box blade is the best tool to maintain the driveway. Until this year I was maintaining an 800 ft gravel driveway.

The box blade is great for rough work and creating new roadway and filling in major ditches and wet spots. It's terrible for leveling and maintaining. First of all, it doesn't angle which turns out to be very usefill to fill in the ruts. Second you don't need the scarifiers for maintaining and it seems more of a waste. It is good however if the middle gets over grown with grass and you want to rip it out and relevel the driveway and not move stone around.

I used a landscape rake almost exclusively although a york rake would be easier. When spreading new stone, either the landscape rake or the angled blade works better than the box blade. I like having the angle blade and the landscape rake for routine driveway work but If I could only afford one it would be the landscape rake.
 

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If you can't afford a land plane or box blade, then a rear blade should be an affordable compromise.

A lot of times I use mine with the up/down angle pin removed so the blade floats over terrain instead of making heavy cuts. Then I rotate the blade 180-degrees for a finish pass.

Depending on the landscape rake make and model, I suspect the same technique could be used as well.

Having a top-n-tilt setup on your three point hitch will give you more control too.

What matters is finding the right tool and technique for you and your conditions.
 

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Driveway

I have a 1026R and use a 48" box blade. It works excellent. I also use the box blade as a counter weight and it works great on landscaping.








If you can't afford a land plane or box blade, then a rear blade should be an affordable compromise.

A lot of times I use mine with the up/down angle pin removed so the blade floats over terrain instead of making heavy cuts. Then I rotate the blade 180-degrees for a finish pass.

Depending on the landscape rake make and model, I suspect the same technique could be used as well.

Having a top-n-tilt setup on your three point hitch will give you more control too.

What matters is finding the right tool and technique for you and your conditions.
 

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Driveway

I have a 1026R. I use a 48" box blade for my driveway, a counter weight and landscaping. Works excellent. I also have a box blade on another farm and maintain about 3/4 of a mile of gravel. Excellent results. Saved lots of fuel over a back blade.
 

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After two days of owning my landpride GS1560, I could not wish for a better gravel tool. Works great behind my 2520.

Use it around the grain bin lot, shed lot, and the driveway so far.
 

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In my opinion, a drag scraper will be the best for a gravel lane. I made my own land plane/grader which also works very good with gravel.
I also use a rear blade so I can scrap the sides back toward the middle.

The advantage of the longer plane is you will eliminate ripples. The box blade, front blade and rear blade are affected by the tractor as it goes up and down through low spots. I now use my 2210 which has more power and traction than the 455. The hydraulic lift is handy when the gravel gets too deep.

Works for me,
GotDeeres
I am going to respectfully disagree with the above opinions that a box blade is the best tool to maintain the driveway. Until this year I was maintaining an 800 ft gravel driveway.

The box blade is great for rough work and creating new roadway and filling in major ditches and wet spots. It's terrible for leveling and maintaining. First of all, it doesn't angle which turns out to be very usefill to fill in the ruts. Second you don't need the scarifiers for maintaining and it seems more of a waste. It is good however if the middle gets over grown with grass and you want to rip it out and relevel the driveway and not move stone around.

I used a landscape rake almost exclusively although a york rake would be easier. When spreading new stone, either the landscape rake or the angled blade works better than the box blade. I like having the angle blade and the landscape rake for routine driveway work but If I could only afford one it would be the landscape rake.
Well that makes three of us.
I could never understand why some insist on digging up the very thing they are trying to level and pack. Loose material causes pot holes, every time. Landscape rake for maintenance any day of the week,,,,,IMO.
 

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Well that makes three of us.
I could never understand why some insist on digging up the very thing they are trying to level and pack. Loose material causes pot holes, every time. Landscape rake for maintenance any day of the week,,,,,IMO.
A man who knows what he is talking about. Why dig up a packed stone base and mix it with dirt only to end up with a mud road? I try not to go any deeper with the landscape rake than I have to.
 

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Why dig up a packed stone base
Because what I have in my situation isn't a packed stone base.
It's a dirt road with 2B modified gravel on it.
When I get a pothole,just filling it only works for a little while. If it rains enough, they are back within a month.
Young drivers don't understand the meaning of straddling and going slow.We'll just keep flying right through them.:nunu:

I could never understand why some insist on digging up the very thing they are trying to level and pack
Just grading never did any good for me.
When I use my box blade and "dig" then up,they are good to go,for a whole summer. This works really well for me.

Greg
 

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Hard packed high spots will never disappear without ripping through them first. Why real road graders come with a scarifier in the front.
 

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I'm in the process of purchasing a 1026R and I am trying to figure out the best way to regularly grade my gravel laneway that is about half a mile long to get rid of pot holes, etc. I'm debating between:
- a box blade,
- a drag scraper,
- a rear blade,
- or a front blade.

Any recommendations or insights? Any particular brands or pieces of equipment to recommend?

Finally, will the 1026R be powerful enough?
What level of depth of your gravel laneway do you feel you need to reach/move to grade and fill potholes? If your answer is you want to simply grade the surface gravel, then a surface implement is needed (rear blade, landscape rake or box blade w/o scarifiers). If you need to go deeper then you need something that will dig under the surface (box blade w. scarifiers or land plane). Also do you want to maintain a center crown in the laneway? For a box blade this might require tilting. A blade/landscape rake can be angled to push material to the center.

I personally find my rear landscape rake is perfect for grading my gravel areas. I like how the tines vibrate to loosen just the top layer enough to give you some material to easily spread. You can also play with removing tines to find what works best as well as turning the landscape rake completely around when you only want a gentle grading. I really have no desire to dig up the gravel. I just want to grade the surface.
 

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Since you have a box scraper maybe you could get some of these side plates made. You can set them to the depth you want any new or added rock to be. This was the first and only way I had to do it for years.
I have included a shot of my new improved tool which is a big improvement.
 

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