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Hoping I can get some input from everyone. I'm planning on putting new gravel in my drive this spring along with adding a new lane to two of my barns. Looking for advise on gravel size. Also looking for advise on if I need to put fresh dirt as a sub layer and gravel on top. Thanks in advance.
 

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First, for new drive, break up any sod!

Then, here's where I go against the grain, never anything bigger than 3/4"! For the base, I prefer 3/4" w/fines, comes under different names in different areas. Once there is a good, packed base, I use 3/8" chips, makes for much easier walking.

Some people swear by 3" rock as a base, but it always seems to work it's way to the top.
 

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I will be adding more driveway to make a circle driveway this year. My plan is to put down a layer of AB3 for the base layer and then put the usual 3/4 inch gravel for a top layer. Sorry, do not yet know the thickness needed.

Dave
 

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This is what I put in form my drive.

There was a great deal of soft in my drive during the construction of the home there was large stone brought in. Much bigger than 4s. After, 4s were put in. That layer was approximately 2 feet. On top of that 4s were put and then 2s that layer depends upon where you measure it but it is a minimum of an additional foot up to 3 ft thick to make a consistent grade from the pad to the road. Was there one winter with 2 1/2 feet of snow blown into the large dip that was below the road grade even when only 2 inches. On top of that was a 6 inch layer of modified (2s and fines mixed). This was all compacted at 6 inch layers from the 4s to the top coat with a full size vibratory roller (25 ton unit). Then 4 inches of binder and two of top coat. Very good drive. Has held up extremely well for 16 years now.:bigthumb:
 

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We use class 2 w/ fines as the base over the hard yellow clay in western MN. Then we like granite fines on top layer. It looks great and doesn't tend to get mushy or soupy
 

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Also looking for advise on if I need to put fresh dirt as a sub layer and gravel on top.
Generally speaking, you don't want "dirt". You usually want to remove any loam/topsoil layer and get down to a compacted sub-soil base of sand/gravel. Any gravel you apply over any loose soil is just going to sink down into that soil. Once you are down to a solid base you backfill with your base and then finish material. The farther down you go the larger the stone you use when backfilling.

Each layer of gravel should be roughly 4" thick so start from the top and calculate downward. Choose your finish material (pea gravel, chip, etc...) and figure on it being 4" deep. Then go up in size from there with each layer. If your solid base is 12" below grade, for example, put a geotextille fabric under the whole thing then you could do 4" of 4" riprap followed by 4" of 2" riprap followed by 4" of pea gravel. Compact each layer as you apply them.
 

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Road/drive construction all depends on what you have available and what your ground conditions are.
Are you in a heavy clay, sand, well draining, not so well draining, mudhole in winter, ect.

Putting a road in on top of topsoil is a general no-no.
It's cheaper to build it back up with a good packing well draining sub material, then top off with something like crushed concrete or stone blend. Like 3/4" or 1".
Again, it all depends on your budget and the costs of the materials and delivery in your area. Delivery itself has skyrocketed in the past 10 years.

We generally use larger blends like 1 1/2" or 2" blends for heavy truck roads.
 

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There was a great deal of soft in my drive during the construction of the home there was large stone brought in. Much bigger than 4s. After, 4s were put in. That layer was approximately 2 feet. On top of that 4s were put and then 2s that layer depends upon where you measure it but it is a minimum of an additional foot up to 3 ft thick to make a consistent grade from the pad to the road. Was there one winter with 2 1/2 feet of snow blown into the large dip that was below the road grade even when only 2 inches. On top of that was a 6 inch layer of modified (2s and fines mixed). This was all compacted at 6 inch layers from the 4s to the top coat with a full size vibratory roller (25 ton unit). Then 4 inches of binder and two of top coat. Very good drive. Has held up extremely well for 16 years now.:bigthumb:
Yep - must be a PA thing. For any new driveway around here a good base of #4's is essential - anything smaller and you'll just loose it. You could put down tons and tons of 3/4" stone year after year and it will all dissapear.

Just like was said - base of #4's - middle layer of #2 - then the top layer 2" of what we call around here 2A which is #2 limestone with a binder in it - rolls in to form a nice hard top layer.
 

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OK, first question is: how long have you lived at the place you want to gravel? Do you have big front load d
Garbage trucks come in and out? If so, just look for 1.5" to3.2" . The last thing you want to do is put down a dirt layer under the new rock, as it will was out and be all muddy front the heavy spring Indiana rains. Also, if the drive is under 6 years old, you will want to put down 53 rock and then small rock. Same for a new drive.
 

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Ha-Ha..... You guys out east have never built roads in the Midwest where top soil can be ten feet deep or more. And below that can be mucky clay that never gets solid.

I absolutely HATE crushed rock around grass. Too hard to keep it where you want it and too hard to get it back where you had it when it escapes.

Don't use anything bigger than 3/4 or one inch, too hard on mower blades when you hit it. And potentially dangerous to anyone/anything in the immediate area.
 

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Thanks. Lived here for 28 years, pretty much my whole life. Replacing 4 year old gravel and adding new lanes to buildings.
OK, 28 years... small rock should be fine...

As far as new roads, do you have a creek? If so, save some:gizmo: and dredge the creek. Then, use that rock for ballast and put small rock on top.
 

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When we do driveways at work, we will dig down 18", put drainage in if necessary, cover with road fabric then back fill with crusher run/Quarry Process (QP), rubble, whatever the local terminology is, but pretty much it is everything from stone dust to #2 stone, so 3/4-1" in size. We will compact it in 6" lifts which makes for a very compact surface. When we do paver driveways, we will put 2" of stone dust on top then the pavers.

Good luck

Adam
 

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I would go with asphalt millings. Just helped by brother-in-law spread 30tons of the stuff to beef up his 200yd driveway two weeks ago. I will take some pics and put up tomorrow for you.
 

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I would go with asphalt millings. Just helped by brother-in-law spread 30tons of the stuff to beef up his 200yd driveway two weeks ago. I will take some pics and put up tomorrow for you.
Asphalt millings are awesome - except we aren't allowed to use them around here. Maybe it has to do with living in the middle of a state forest - I don't know. We used to be able to get them from a road contractor - now they pile them up at a wide spot and haul them away. The only loose material we can use is limestone.
 

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Let me guess the nanny-state is concerned about the residual oil in the millings.

Try recycled concrete as it's the same price as recycled asphalt here, and no oil to track into the house.
 
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