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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Two weeks in the new house and had water in the basement after 8 inches of rain in three days. At first I didn’t realize where it was coming from but as more came in we figured it out. The basement toilet was the culprit.

First house with a Grinder pump so went to see the neighbor at 7pm on a Friday night and he had the number to a gentleman that worked for the township. He said same thing happened about two months ago and lady I bought the house from called a plumber. He had a company pump the grinder tank out and they found a huge crack around the bottom with ground water running in. They quoted her 10k to fix. Pump $2,500 is burned up from moving all the ground water. He hooked me up with the excavatior the township uses. The ex stirs has unexpected surgery next week s he can’t do the job but knew the original excavator who did all of the site work including the 1,000 gal inground propane tank 5ft from grinder pump tank.

I have to call him to come out Monday and scope out digging it up. Luckily we have the rental house to live in while we get all of this fixed.

I am thinking of rigging a sump pump to take the ground water off the top of he grinder pump tank so it can’t get High enough to flood the basement intil we pull it. Also if we can figure out where the sewer pipe runs under the floor in the basement I would like to put a back flow preventer on the basement bathroom.

Luckily except for the bathroom only unfinished part had water where it spread out and ran to sump pump hole.

And yes will contact my realtor Monday on any recourse with previous owner.

The joys of buying a new home. I did learn from the township person that the ladies significant other that built the house was a mason. And that the one of the fireplaces in the house, The corner details, and basement stonework are from stones on the property. We have big piles of cleared field sandstone on three sides of the property.

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That's a beautiful looking house, sorry to hear your having issues already-wow that would burn me up!
 

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Wow, that place looks beautiful. If the PO knew, the realtor would be a short conversation for me. The longer one would be with the lawyer. Keep track of all your costs.
 

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MDrew is correct.
If the homeowner knew, and you can prove it, which you should be able to fairly easily, they are responsible.
I assume your home inspection didnt show this as a problem.
If you fix it, make sure you keep receipts, but also document everything, who you talked to and when, what they said, etc.
My first call would be to my realtor, and let them know what you now know, and see if they want to contact the previous owner. Sometimes these things end up being as easy as a phone call to get fixed in your favor, sometimes it takes attorneys.


Generally, the grinder pump is for the toilet, but if you have a sewage line running through the basement, why not tie into that?
Its possible Im not quite getting the whole picture here, as it sounds like the tank is very large.
Is this a whole house system? Ive not seen anything like that around here, so Im curious.
If it is a whole house system, Id think the home inspector should have evaluated it during the inspection, or recommended a professional do so if he/she couldnt.
Then again, not everyone uses home inspectors...
 

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You sir sound worse off than us. We moved into a new home (sold our first starter home after 3yrs and wanted a little more house with a few amenities and some property). 3 days in the lifting cable for a garage door snapped, none of my security lights works, i've got a couple thermal pane windows with bad seals and the master bath shower has a piece of packaging tape covering a crack/chip at waist height. Certainly cheaper issues and not nearly as intrusive but they still suck.

homeownership :gizmo:
 

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That sucks Meager. As others have said, document the crap out of everything.

Then again, not everyone uses home inspectors...
Not every state licenses home inspectors. In Colonrado I'm protected from a bad haircut because barbers and stylists have to be state licensed; but home inspectors do not. Anybody can put a gun rack in the back window of their pickup, hang a 4' level on it and call themselves a home inspector. A bad haircut will grow out in a couple of weeks; while a shoddy or even dishonest home inspector can queer a deal worth hundreds of thousands of dollars or give a buyer a false sense of security that they aren't buying a POS. I'm not a fan of over regulation; but since home inspectors have so much influence on real estate transactions here; I think they should be licensed.

3 days in the lifting cable for a garage door snapped, none of my security lights works, i've got a couple thermal pane windows with bad seals and the master bath shower has a piece of packaging tape covering a crack/chip at waist height. Certainly cheaper issues and not nearly as intrusive but they still suck.

homeownership :gizmo:
Oh crap, that sounds like Casa Lemon as I call our place. Was yours built by a turd named Matt W.?
 

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Two weeks in the new house and had water in the basement after 8 inches of rain in three days. At first I didn’t realize where it was coming from but as more came in we figured it out. The basement toilet was the culprit.

First house with a Grinder pump so went to see the neighbor at 7pm on a Friday night and he had the number to a gentleman that worked for the township. He said same thing happened about two months ago and lady I bought the house from called a plumber. He had a company pump the grinder tank out and they found a huge crack around the bottom with ground water running in. They quoted her 10k to fix. Pump $2,500 is burned up from moving all the ground water. He hooked me up with the excavatior the township uses. The ex stirs has unexpected surgery next week s he can’t do the job but knew the original excavator who did all of the site work including the 1,000 gal inground propane tank 5ft from grinder pump tank.

I have to call him to come out Monday and scope out digging it up. Luckily we have the rental house to live in while we get all of this fixed.

I am thinking of rigging a sump pump to take the ground water off the top of he grinder pump tank so it can’t get High enough to flood the basement intil we pull it. Also if we can figure out where the sewer pipe runs under the floor in the basement I would like to put a back flow preventer on the basement bathroom.

Luckily except for the bathroom only unfinished part had water where it spread out and ran to sump pump hole.

And yes will contact my realtor Monday on any recourse with previous owner.

The joys of buying a new home. I did learn from the township person that the ladies significant other that built the house was a mason. And that the one of the fireplaces in the house, The corner details, and basement stonework are from stones on the property. We have big piles of cleared field sandstone on three sides of the property.

View attachment 656348
View attachment 656352
Wow, love the stone work!
Feel free to post some more pics of it. :laugh:
 

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That sucks Meager. As others have said, document the crap out of everything.



Not every state licenses home inspectors. In Colonrado I'm protected from a bad haircut because barbers and stylists have to be state licensed; but home inspectors do not. Anybody can put a gun rack in the back window of their pickup, hang a 4' level on it and call themselves a home inspector. A bad haircut will grow out in a couple of weeks; while a shoddy or even dishonest home inspector can queer a deal worth hundreds of thousands of dollars or give a buyer a false sense of security that they aren't buying a POS. I'm not a fan of over regulation; but since home inspectors have so much influence on real estate transactions here; I think they should be licensed.



Oh crap, that sounds like Casa Lemon as I call our place. Was yours built by a turd named Matt W.?

Here its required. I am one actually.
It amazes me how some guys not only stay in business, but remain pretty busy, with the lousy work they do.
Licensing doesnt completely fix it, but it does help. The biggest issue is, once a house is inspected, you dont find out until later that you had a bad one. By then, its generally too late to do anything. Then you get people that know nothing at all about homes, their construction, systems, etc, and they might not find out for quite some time.
Having had a bad one cost us big years ago, from someone I thought I could trust, well, I figure if he can do it, a trained monkey could probably do better, and it wouldnt be too hard to be a lot more upfront and helpful to the buyer than a couple around here are.
Sorry you guys are having these issues. Having had surprises myself, its not fun at all.
In my case, it cost me $6500 to fix the situation, and had it been pointed out as the major issue it was, instead of something minor and not worth messing with, the seller would have been required to fix it.
 

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Two questions:

Was this issue covered in the sellers disclosure?

Did you or the seller purchase a home warranty?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Generally, the grinder pump is for the toilet, but if you have a sewage line running through the basement, why not tie into that?
Its possible Im not quite getting the whole picture here, as it sounds like the tank is very large.
Is this a whole house system? Ive not seen anything like that around here, so Im curious.
If it is a whole house system, Id think the home inspector should have evaluated it during the inspection, or recommended a professional do so if he/she couldnt.
Then again, not everyone uses home inspectors...
Whole house systems aren't real common but they exist. If the lot is sloped and the septic system is located uphill from the house, what else can ya do?

I have a pump in my septic tank. The tank itself is slightly downhill from the house but my leach field is at the other end of the lot up on top of a small hill. So the pump is there to send the liquid uphill to where it needs to go. It's in it's own chamber in the septic tank and will hold enough that it usually only needs to kick on for a couple of minutes every 3 or 4 days.

Home inspectors usually won't even look at something like that and may not even have known that it existed. They just put boilerplate "Have the septic system inspected by a professional..." lingo in their report. (Same with the chimneys!)

I walked around with the inspector that looked at our place before we bought it and the only tool he had with him was a screwdriver and the only time he used it was to take the cover off the circuit breaker boxes. He used a circuit tester on every outlet in the house, tested every GFCI outlet, every smoke detector and a bunch of other stuff but if there was something that he couldn't look at without opening something, he referred it to a specialist in the report.
 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
It was not disclosed even though the owner had gotten estimates to repair. Realtors are are discussing. Per our agreement something like this goes to arbitration.

The house is tied into the township sewer system. The main house line and the downstairs sinks and bathroom all drain through the floor and out into to a 20 inch in diameter tank that goes down 12 feet. The grinder pump has a control and alarm panel on the side of the house. It pumps from this tank over 900ft up the drive (about 5 ft up elevation) and into the town line at the street.

Since the bottom of the tank is cracked we have to excavate down 12ft and build a new gravel base to set the new unit on and then backfill.

The rental I am in has one but the tank only goes down 5ft and the main house line goes thorough the side of the basement wall CS the bottom. The washer and sink in the basement, and roughed in bathroom all to a small ejector pit in the basement floor that pumps up and into the main house line.

Issue with my new house is all the extra depth so they drain through the floor. We may go with a fiberglass tank vs the HDPE. If one failed putting the same type back in doesn’t make allot of sense to me.

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Even with the arbitration agreement, I'd run it passed a lawyer. Might be well worth the money. I'm not Sue happy, but I like to at least get kissed.
 

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Whole house systems aren't real common but they exist. If the lot is sloped and the septic system is located uphill from the house, what else can ya do?

I have a pump in my septic tank. The tank itself is slightly downhill from the house but my leach field is at the other end of the lot up on top of a small hill. So the pump is there to send the liquid uphill to where it needs to go. It's in it's own chamber in the septic tank and will hold enough that it usually only needs to kick on for a couple of minutes every 3 or 4 days.

Home inspectors usually won't even look at something like that and may not even have known that it existed. They just put boilerplate "Have the septic system inspected by a professional..." lingo in their report. (Same with the chimneys!)

I walked around with the inspector that looked at our place before we bought it and the only tool he had with him was a screwdriver and the only time he used it was to take the cover off the circuit breaker boxes. He used a circuit tester on every outlet in the house, tested every GFCI outlet, every smoke detector and a bunch of other stuff but if there was something that he couldn't look at without opening something, he referred it to a specialist in the report.
Thats why I was confused. Around here, a grinder pump is generally in a basement bathroom, where none existed before, and its pretty small.
His pictures helped significantly.
Ive seen the in septic tank pumps before, but again, confusion set in and somehow I thought this was under his floor in the basement.
In my defense, I have been sick the last few days, and not thinking straight, lol.

Unfortunately, inspectors are not allowed to remove or move anything in the home to access what they need to look at.
Quite a few around here have no background whatsoever in home design or construction, and most cant even do basic maintenance on their own homes. To me, this should disqualify them, as they have no idea whats going on behind a wall, or anywhere they cant see.
Its a visual, non-invasive (non-destructive) inspection to uncover obvious defects, but it should also help inform the homeowner about any potential problems as well, and what or who to contact about them.
It occurs to me that a home warranty would be better in a lot of cases than an expensive home inspection from someone who knows nothing about homes.
The trouble is, some are catching on to this trend, and inspection companies are selling their own "warranties" that are absolutely awful. One near me offers a one year warranty. Their only liability though, if you read the fine print, is the cost of the initial inspection. Who does that help? Nobody. And if enough people buy them and try to claim a repair, Id think that would be fairly bad for business, but again, its unlikely that people will buy more than one home while an inspector is still in business, so they dont count on repeat business.
In my case, its an uphill battle against these kinds of people.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
They delivered the portal potty for the paint crew that starts next week. It is very hard to get the work done like the old pump tank out and new one in with it being hunting season.

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Really pretty

Beautiful styled home MeagerHair! :bigthumb:
That is a really pretty house. Hopefully this will soon be rectified and you can enjoy the house.

Treefarmer
 

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Discussion Starter #17
So through this process I found out the friend of the lady I purchased the house (who lived with her and then they split hence the house sale) was a mason by trade.

All of the corner stones and the fireplace in the picture above are laid up from stones on the lot. I have 3 to foot piles of sandstone on the sides of the lot.

I have a great GC working on everything. He is getting the shop drawn and set so we can permit it and finish it. Along with the paint and wood refinishing crew. Getting 10 years of cigarette smoke out requires complete wipe down and full painting and refinish of the wood.

At least we can get this all done while we are living in the rental.
 

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I really like your new house, congratulations.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
New tank arrived at the contractors on Friday. They are going to try to do the swap on Thursday. They are trying to do on a very choreographed timeline. The hole has to be 15 feet deep to put in the base under the tank and they want to do the whole process rapidly because the longer the hole is open the more mud and water problems we will have.

The spousal unit will be out of town. I want to get over while they are doing it to capture some pictures..
 

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This has gone on for awhile, you guys still haven't been able to move it? IF this grinder tank wasn't fractured would you have already been in?
 
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