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Here is a very good article from the Michigan State University Agricultural Extension Office, on the proper uses of Grub Control products to help prevent moles and all the destruction they can bring. Click on the link to see the full article and details.


How to choose and when to apply grub control products for your lawn | MSU Extension



One thing I wanted to specifically highlight here is the results of a test which found one of the most commonly sold grub control products is a complete failure at dealing with and killing / preventing grubs. This is in the article as well, but I have copied and pasted it here for quick reference to bring attention to this matter.

Please note that the ground temperature is very important in the effectiveness of applied Grub Control products. Normally, in our area, the ground temps would be where they should be by this time of the year, but this year the actual ground temps are about 12 degrees lower than they typically are this time of year, so it's important to be aware of ground temps when using these products.

""There is a widely sold trade name called Triazicide from Spectrum that lists grubs on the label and states it will control insects above or below ground and has a picture of a grub on the front of the bag. It contains only lambda-cyhalothrin or gamma-cyhalothrin. Triazicide will not control grubs. Carefully check the label for ingredients.""

3) Insecticides that DO NOT work on grubs

Do not use products containing ONLY lambda-cyhalothrin, gamma-cyhalothrin, bifenthrin, deltamethrin, cyfluthrin or permethrin for grub control. Products containing only these ingredients will not work for grub control because the active ingredient binds with organic material and will not move down to where the grubs are feeding. These products work well for above-ground feeding insects that live on the grass leaves or soil surface, but not for insects that feed on the roots. At one garden center a clerk showed us two products, one containing only permethrin and one containing only bifenthrin, when we asked for products to control grubs. Neither of the products listed grubs on the label printed on the bag and neither of the products would have controlled grubs.


There are several products on the market that contain a combination of one of the preventive compounds and one of the above listed insecticides that “do not work on grubs.” The preventive ingredient will make it an effective choice for grub control.

Do NOT WASTE YOUR MONEY ON THIS PRODUCT
if your goal is Grub control


I have also seen this same product in a RED Bag with Green Highlights, just the opposite coloring of this bag.........

 

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Good timing Sully! I was just on my deck this morning and thinking "I wonder if it's the right time to apply some grub control?". HONEST, I was!!

Just out of curiosity, what do you buy and use?

Can you come down this way and do something about those stupid moles in my (and all my neighbors) yard? :good2:
 

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Good timing Sully! I was just on my deck this morning and thinking "I wonder if it's the right time to apply some grub control?". HONEST, I was!!

Just out of curiosity, what do you buy and use?

Can you come down this way and do something about those stupid moles in my (and all my neighbors) yard? :good2:
X2... I would be interested to see a list of products that DO work.
 

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from the listed link, and posted by a beekeeper "Protecting bees and other pollinators. If you are applying a product containing clothianidin, thiamethoxam or imidacloprid, the lawn should be mowed prior to the application so that no weeds are flowering in the lawn when the insecticide is applied. These active ingredients can be toxic to bees if the bees visit flowers that were recently sprayed. Mowing prior to making the application will avoid this problem by removing the flowers. Weeds that flower again after mowing will not have the chemical directly on the flowers and are much safer for the bees. If there is nothing flowering in the lawn, there is nothing in it that would attract bees. In addition, grub control products that contain the active ingredient chlorantraniliprole are safe for bees, even when weed flowers are sprayed. Finally, avoid spray drift or granular spreader drift to flower beds when applying thiamethoxam, imidacloprid, clothianidin or any insecticide for grubs other than chlorantraniliprole " always follow instruction
 

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Great timing for this thread!
It should be revisited around early June too!

I tried that stuff they said not to use, and it certainly doesnt work.
The only thing Ive had luck with is Merit. I buy it from a local seed company, and a bag usually gets me two applications (one per year).

Timing is everything, and I might not be the best at that, as I still end up with grubs, and the moles that come to eat them.
 

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My sister's farm was over-run with japanese beetles back in the 1950's

They treated the farm (2,000 acres) with milky spore,,

Instantly (within two years) the grubs were gone, and are still gone.

:dunno:
 

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interesting they only list hard chemicals for control, this is what I used many years ago, and never had a problem after that. Is more expensive, but no need to reapply every year. just one link many others.

https://www.domyown.com/milky-spore-powder-questions-pq-2948.html


:bigthumb:
I was going to mention milky spore. My father has had excellent luck with this and if the soil is not disturbed, as you mentioned, it is more or less forever. He has a small yard, but treated with milky spore, he actually observed mole tunnels that make u-turns when they get to his property line! I just have no clue what it would cost to do an acre in milky spore.

Lee
 

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I forgot about milky spore!
Ive read quite a bit of good stuff about it, and the once applied, its good basically forever if not disturbed makes it very attractive. That and the fact that it doesnt hurt desirable stuff too.
 

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Milky spore only works against Japanese beetle grubs. In a suburban upstate NY community where we lived for many years, the majority of the grubs were European chafers. Sevin applied in the fall seemed to work best. A lot of the effectiveness of controls depends on local climate.See this.

Al
 

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Discussion Starter #11
RM

Milky Spores will work if applied correctly, but it won't kill the grubs immediately, it will just make the conditions for grub growth much less conducive going forward. It's very long lasting if applied correctly and very effective at insect control and reasonably priced compared to some of the other options. It's also a natural approach, But it's got to be used in conjunction with several other ongoing lawn insect and mole control methods.

Ironically, the MSU Extension office claims they have no data to support that Milky spores works at all. So they won't issue an opinion on it's use. I think it's interesting they don't have any data or opinion on it despite it being around for many years.

The trick is to properly apply it, a table spoon every 4 feet treating the yard like a giant grid. This is how I apply it using the handle and funnel method, less the dowel rod mentioned below. This works very well. Even though it's supposed to last up to 20 years and 10 years is common, I re-treat with Milky Spores every 3 years and this is the year to reapply it.

My Actual Lawn Care and Treatment Program

A.- I fertilize with a commercial grade fertilizer that is used on golf courses which I get through the local Farm Mill. The product is very high quality and long lasting. It's also not causing run off into the storm sewers, etc. I always use granular fertilizer. My lawn is about 2 acres with the grass area being 72,000 sq feet, the rest are landscape beds, flower areas, etc.

B.- I apply the fertilizer on the following schedule - Early April, Middle of June (between Memorial day and 4th of July) Labor Day and final one is Between Halloween and Thanksgiving when leaf cleanup is done. (4 total Applications). If one the goal is to get to 3 applications, I would drop the Labor day application. The one between Halloween and Thanksgiving is the most important to feed the lawn for the winter so it can be strong and resilient in the spring.

C. - Mowing is done at 3.75" of height, about every 5 days with the ExMark Zero Turn shown in the photos. The photo's are just before I commence mowing. When I cut my yard each mowing, I actually mow the entire yard twice with the 2nd cutting always at a 90 degree angle to the first. I use gator blades and mulch in the clippings. The angles change every mowing so there are no consistent tire patterns or wear marks in the lawn..

The second photo is looking across a portion of the backyard towards the pine trees which are a barrier to the roadway which is to the right of the tree's shown in the 2nd photo below. These trees were 12' tall when planted and they have grown considerably.

IMG_20170809_130200800.jpg IMG_20170809_130140069.jpg


D.- All weed control is done by spraying as needed. I would estimate I spray for broad leafs maybe three times a season. I also use the Killz All for chemically edging everything to avoid having to use the string trimmer. It works very well. I use the 45 gallon sprayer which goes on the 3PH on my 1025R.

E.- Watering of the lawn is done by underground irrigation on a dedicated well which pumps 65 gallons per minute. This permits me to run a lot of sprinkler heads simultaneously, which I do. My lawn has 16 zones with 10 to 14 sprinkler heads per zone. My irrigation system runs for 8 minutes per zone starting at 11 pm, then again at 4:45 am and then at 5pm. My sprinklers all spray from head to head, not spray to spray.

I have a rain gauge, moisture measuring device on the edge of the eave of my home which catches and measures rain water. When it reaches a preset amount, it turns the irrigation system off and until enough evaporation has occurred to warrant the system starting again, it won't turn back on. This prevents the system running when it's raining and it prevents over watering.


Grub Treatment / Insect Prevention / Mole Prevention / Mole Eradication (assassination).....

1. I used to perimeter treat the outer 50 to 75 foot of the entire lawn. I apply this to the entire lawn about Mid April into early June depending upon the weather patterns and sol temperatures. This product MUST be washed into the lawn with either rain or irrigation shortly after it is applied or it won't work.

Also, it's important to not apply too early in the season or it won't be effective on the grubs and too late, it also won't be effective. If the ground is too cold, the products won't work. I found that MSU posts an average temperature of the ground in their area and its close enough to use for the temps in my area for grub product application guidelines.

It's really important to understand the product you are using because the application of it (how and when it's applied) has a very profound impact. With fertilizers, you can apply anytime and likely get some or most of the products benefits. That is NOT the case with Grubb control. That's why I started this thread as many people improperly deal with grubs and it can result in wasting a lot of money each season and still having grubs, moles and lawn destruction.

I like this product in conjunction with the other pieces of the lawn maintenance.




2. Along the road boundary, I planted a bunch of pine trees which were 12' tall when planted. Now, many of them are taller than the top line on the phone and power pole. It's hard to treat under the pine trees because of limbs, etc. as I maintain the trees to keep a barrier. Sometimes I will get a mole in the non grass area under the pines, which came from the ditch and county roadside. These guys get introduced to this;



If you put this in the main runs, it's very effective. Also, in the active runs, I use a product which is designed for killing Mice and Rats. Just be careful that you don't have cats digging for moles or the cat could be in serious trouble.

IMG_20180418_161803522.jpg IMG_20180418_161956203.jpg

I take a old handle that I use for picking up trash and I tape an old transmission fluid funnel to it. I have cut the bottom of the funnel so it will permit the green poison "coco puffs" to roll right through the funnel. At one end of the old handle, I tape the funnel with the end about 6 inches past the wooden handle. The other end of the wooden handle has a round old dowel rod taped to it. I use the old dowel rod to poke a hole in the tunnel and flip the stick over, stick the end of the funnel in the hole and drop 5 or 6 of the round "coco puff" into the tunnel and then use my foot to cover up the hole.

In my soil, if you use the funnel to poke the hole in the mole run, it plugs up the funnel or at a minimum, get mud in it and the coco puffs don't drop cleanly. That's why I use the old dowel rod on the other end to poke the hole. If you have sandy soil, you can get away with probably using the funnel for hole poking and poison delivery. When I am done with the mole treatment, I un-tape the funnel and dowel rod and use my handle for roadside trash pickup with the special sharpened point I put on it. It's a "Multi Tool", mole tunnel poison delivery and road side trash pick up.....:laugh:

This way, I don't have to bend over to drop the poison or poke the hole in the tunnel. I can walk along and poke the tunnel, and drop the poison and cover very efficiently with my foot. When you are covering the hole you made to drop the poison, Try to not crush the entire tunnel, just cover it so sunlight doesn't get in the hole. Otherwise, the moles might not find the poison and will go over, under or around it.


You can also use these worms. Also, ALWAYS WEAR GLOVES WHEN HANDLING THESE WORMS. When I have used these, I take scissors and cut these into 1/3rd of their full length and use the smaller pieces in various parts of the runs. It's always important to try and target the main mole runs or it's very easy to waste these "worms" and they are not cheap. To be totally honest, I am not sure the worms work any better than the little green rat poison and they are MUCH MORE MONEY. I can buy a bag of the rat poison to treat the entire lawn for 2 or 3 years for less than the cost of one box of 10 or 12 worms.

Make sure you wear gloves because the moles can smell humans and are less likely to eat the poison, plus the poison is obviously dangerous to human touch. I am told these smell like fish and the moles like the smell so it attracts them. I can tell you, the funnel and "Coco Puffs Approach" is a very effective way to deal with the entire yard if you have a lot of moles. Buy a bag of these, drop 5 or 6 pellets in each hole in the run and this has worked well at killing the moles. You would easily spend $100 to $150 on worms when I have found that $18 worth of poison will get the same results.

The Last Approach and not recommended for all areas due to, well you will see.......
Twice last summer, while mowing the neighbors front yard, I ran over a mole run and noticed it being pushed back up when I was on the return pass with the mower. In both instances, I stopped and pulled my carry gun and put a 9mm Black talon round into the leading edge of the moving tunnel and movement stopped and never resumed.

Of course, you quickly turn the safety back on, swap out the magazine in the gun with the spare you carry so there are no rounds missing, put the carry gun back in the holster, pick up the discharged casing and properly dispose of it. Then if anyone says anything, you say "I really need to get that backfire in the mower fixed.":dunno:

That's my lawn care protocol and the tools and products used.
 

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I've had fair results with the Grub Ex.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
It's a combination of things which are needed to keep the lawn nice. I have a neighbor who always grub treats and fertilizes, but he doesn't have any irrigation and he is constantly battling moles. Reasons are;

1. He doesn't apply the Grub control correctly or see that it is washed into the soil.

2. Without irrigation, his yard gets very stressed in the heat of summer. This means dry areas, which the grass has no root structure.

3. The grass without roots is harder to target the grubs to kill them depending upon the product used.

4. Lawns which aren't strong are targets for Racoons and Possums to do this;

IMG_20180329_102058278.jpg

5. He also doesn't treat for weeds so the weeds choke out the grass.

6. Since the grubs are NOT treated correctly, he has moles everywhere. I suggested he borrow my funnel and trash picking up multi tool to treat the mole runs manually with the poison, but he said "That takes too much time".....................

7. Every year he approaches me and asks me why he can't get his lawn looking the way my lawn looks. I explain items 1 through 6 and he says he will work on it and then next April, we will have this same discussion, again.

He was here this afternoon when I was outside.........He want's my help but he wont listen and follow my advice. Also, he thinks that dragging a hose out to the spot in the yard and letting it run for 3 hours with one sprinkler is how you water. His lawn is about the same size as my lawn.

Now that he is hooked up to city water, boy is he in for a surprise if he does that hose in the yard for hours trick. I told him to make sure to have the plumbers set up the water connection so that he can irrigate the lawn with the well to the outside faucets, but they didn't. I told him when he puts in underground sprinkling, he obviously should use the well to run it, but he will have to scale it back to 3 or 4 sprinkler heads per zone as his well doesn't have anywhere near the pressure of my irrigation well. Time will tell................

We have had these same discussions for 5 years and until he puts in irrigation and LISTENS to specific advice and follows directions, the problems will persist. He wanted to apply grub control tonight and couldn't get his John Deere Lawn tractor started. I told him we aren't going to have measurable rain for the next several days so he should wait. Since his tractor battery was dead, we will see if he listens.................or just jumps starts it and goes.
 

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Milky spore only works against Japanese beetle grubs. In a suburban upstate NY community where we lived for many years, the majority of the grubs were European chafers. Sevin applied in the fall seemed to work best. A lot of the effectiveness of controls depends on local climate.See this.

Al
interesting info from the Cornell piece.

Core cultivation? Recent research has shown that core cultivation (also known as core aerifying or spiking)
can destroy up to 81% of the white grubs present in a lawn. Information on timing, number of cultivations
necessary, and other critical issues has not yet been resolved, so we do not have a recommendation at this time
you get the idea, I only use chemical when I can find no other way that works.:laugh:
 

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Sullybear, I assume you are in Michigan, since the post about Grubs came from Michigan.
Soil up there is considerably different from most other areas, being its mostly sand and drains (read drys out) fast. My Dad lives up there, and an irrigation system is just about a requirement to have any kind of decent lawn.
In Indiana, not so much. My last house, I had the best lawn in the neighborhood. By a long shot. No irrigation, but I do have a Rain Train I run when it gets dry out.
Now that weve moved, Im fighting the lawn here. Had a TON of crabgrass, weeds, and bermudagrass. I dont want any of that, so I spent the last year killing it all with roundup. This year is the year I expect a BIG turn around.
For us, at least in this general area, its core aerating Spring and Fall, overseed if needed, decent fertilizer and weed control program and done.

Back to what I was getting at, and that is, anyone wanting a nice lawn needs to see what the soil in their area needs. Some areas irrigation is a must. Some its completely unnecessary. Some require different fertilizer requirements, etc. Anyone truly interested should do research for their area on the differences.

I had several people asking me about my old lawn. Id tell them the same as you basically, and would they do it? Nope.
I call people who constantly ask for your advice and then refuse to take it time after time, ask holes. Lol.

Anyway, having a green area near your house isnt hard. Having a nice lawn is. It takes work, and lots of people just dont want to do it.
Heck, once a month, Id walk it after mowing and spot spray the hard to kill weeds. My old lawn had NO flowering dandelions, ever. Neighbors couldnt understand why, even though theyd see me out in the lawn all the time doing stuff. Funny how that works.

By the way, that mole trap is the best you can buy. I put it out 3 times this year already, and got 3 moles. Ive had it for just about a year. Ive never had it trip without having a mole in it.
 

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Here's a video explaining the life cycle of grubs.Aylln used to work for a
turf company.Skip to 2:30 where he starts talking about it.
 

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We had a beautiful lawn and landscaping at our last house in Florida and it was a constant fight with grubs and moles. We solved that problem permanently by moving to the Texas Hill Country, moles here would need a jackhammer to root around.
 

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I have also used milky spore on my lawn in northern michigan and have had really good results but the lawn is irrigated as well. I used to have occasional lawn damage from skunks grubbing in the lawn but haven't had any since starting to use milky spore. I had to dig a trench last fall through the lawn to bury a wire and did notice one or two grubs but not nearly the number that I had previously experienced. I used one bag on my 1/2 acre lawn and will probably add one this spring or fall and call it good.
 

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Beetles and moles

Good timing Sully! I was just on my deck this morning and thinking "I wonder if it's the right time to apply some grub control?". HONEST, I was!!

Just out of curiosity, what do you buy and use?

Can you come down this way and do something about those stupid moles in my (and all my neighbors) yard? :good2:
LOL, when we bought our house the yard was full of mole holes and we had lots of Japanese beetles. Somewhere along the way, I read that beetles prefer very short grass and don't use turf that has slightly longer grass.

Hmmm, mowing the lawn isn't my favorite task so I started cutting it just a little higher. It actually worked. The lawn person cutting next door still cuts low and that yard is full of mole runs and they basically stop at the property line.

This may not work for those who have golf course lawns. I'm not really a lawn guy, it's just something to maintain and not something I cherish. Your experience may vary. . .

Treefarmer
 

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Green June Beetle Invasion

I have noticed over the last few weeks that green June beetles are swarming my yard every morning. LOTS of them. I think that they are laying eggs, so I anticipate a future grub problem.

I'm trying to figure out what to do next. Is there a pesticide that can kill the eggs? Should I wait until the eggs hatch and use a pesticide that targets the larvae? Should I put down some kind of grub killer? Grab a badminton racquet and get some exercise? All of the above? Milky spore is apparently only effective against Japanese Beetles, so that isn't an option.

I have a spin spreader, a boom sprayer, and 4 racquets so I can implement just about any option. Just not sure which to choose.

What's the collective wisdom for dealing with Green June Beetles?
 
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