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Discussion Starter #1
I had a 7x18' Anderson equipment trailer (10k) with fold-down ramps that I ended up selling when it was a year old (in 2013 - it was a 2011 that I bought as a leftover). I currently have a 5x8' utility trailer, but am thinking about selling it and getting another equipment trailer that I can do more with.

I have no rear implements, and likely never will. So, it's just the mowing deck, loader (bucket and pallet forks - one can go in the bed of the truck), plus the ballast box. I already have straps, chains, and ratcheting binders to secure everything - I'll just need to be sure whatever trailer I go for has stake pockets or D-Rings that I can use.

While I -may- be able to get away with something as short as 14', I'm thinking of trying to target something that's 16' long. My question is what should I be shooting for in terms of payload capacity / GTWR?

Will a 7k trailer with about 4500 lbs of payload be sufficient to handle the tractor? The machine has turf tires, rears are filled, and the Ballast Box is probably about 3/4 full of sand for weight.

The other thing I will haul with some regularity (once or twice per year) would be pallets of bricks for the stove (eco bricks / bio bricks) that weight a little over a ton each (I would haul two at a time).

I know that the 4500 lbs of payload would cover me for the bricks, but I don't know if it's reasonable for the tractor and attachments. I know the machine itself is about 1900 lbs. Fuel would add around 30 lbs, presume 800 for the ballast box, and the pallet forks are a couple hundred. That puts me close to 3000 without the loader or mowing deck factored in. I'm guessing the pair of those would add about another 800 lbs. A few hundred pounds for the filled rears, and I'm guessing I'm pushing around 4200.

Am I close?
 

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For the cost difference between them I'd shoot for a 10K trailer instead of a 7K. And 16 foot is just about right if you aren't hauling around a brush hog or other large 3pt attachments.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
For the cost difference between them I'd shoot for a 10K trailer instead of a 7K. And 16 foot is just about right if you aren't hauling around a brush hog or other large 3pt attachments.
I hear you, and that's why I went with a 10k trailer in the first place. I'm thinking this time around though, that I wouldn't buy new. That's part of why I was thinking of a lower GTWR.

How about brands? CAM seems like you're paying a bit for the name (still a quality trailer), Anderson is nicely built and maybe a touch cheaper than CAM, Maxxum is apparently built on the CAM assembly line but not able to be customized like the CAM (so, they're built in "bulk" and cheaper), Big Tex never really impressed me in quality for the cost (seems you're paying more for the name) - maybe it was just the local dealer I was working with, though. The Big Text 10ET-18' seems like it would suit my needs quite well for about $3600 if I bought one new.

Additional thoughts and ideas? Definitely want to be very mindful of budget on this, especially since selling the utility trailer is only going to net a few hundred bucks. :)
 

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I have a 2032 that I haul on a 7k 18 foot trailer. Usually the tractor loader, mower and just a trailer mover or box blade on the back. I would not want any less then 18 foot, nice to have a little room to move the tractor around for proper weight balance. I drive on until the truck sags just a few inches which tows very nice without overloading the truck. That puts bucket close to the front of the trailer. If I need forks I put forks on the tractor and pick up bucket with the forks and strap the bucket to the trailer. Proper loading and balance is critical if you want it to tow nice. Too far forward puts a big load on the truck to far back the trailer fishtails. Loaded right you dont know it's back there. Allow a little extra I wouldn't go less then 18
 

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I just took delivery TWO days ago on a 16' Lanscape trailer 7,000 GVW. (utility ) Manufactured by Kaufman Trailers in North Carolina. Trailer has 14' level deck and a two foot dovetail on end to stop MMM from scraping during loading also spring assisted rear reinforced gate. basic model bias tires and incandesent lighting, 2400 and change, Delux model i went with radials, sealed wirting and LED lighting. 2,749. Plus 400.00 shipping. Still cheaper then when I called a Trailed dealer in state who wanter 3,700 -5,5000 for a 5,000 GVW job. and when I explaine I wanted to see what they had before I drove 1 1/2 hours to see inventory there response was you can come see or not. They obviously did not want my business. Kaufman on the other hand polite and fast.

Kaufman Trailers Equipment, Gooseneck, Car, Utility, Flatbed Trailers
 

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Personally, I would feel just fine hauling your tractor on a 16', 7,000 lb GVW trailer. That said, bigger doesn't hurt. I have a 24', 14K trailer and I've often found myself wishing it was a 30', 22K trailer. :laugh:

I wouldn't go shorter than 16', if for no other reason than resale. 16' seems to be the most common used trailer out there. If you ever planned on rear implements, then 18' and 10K would be a good choice.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Presently, and for the foreseeable future, I have no rear implement needs. The only piece that I would consider -renting- if needed would be a rake for leveling new soil. And that can go in the truck bed.

As far as length: I don't believe I would want to consider anything less than 16'. The trailer I had was 18', and its length was very appropriate considering the beavertail on it - with the tractor properly positioned, the BB just made it onto the level part of the deck. So, even if I were to go 16', it would need to be a completely flat deck.

With regard to the type of trailer - I won't consider landscaping trailers as their frames are simply not of the same gauge and grade of material as an equipment trailer. Additionally, the points for tie downs to anchor the tractor are nowhere near as strong as on an equipment trailer. In my eyes, a landscape trailer is capable of handling a significant amount of weight that is well-distributed (like mulch) but not heavier equipment. When the weight is more "concentrated" like it is in, say, a tractor, it puts a lot more stress on a smaller area of the trailer - and I'm just not comfortable with that.

Another thing that I've found with landscape trailers is that many of them have brakes standard on only one axle. By the time you "upgrade" the trailer with brakes on both axles and such, you're looking at about the same cost as an equipment trailer. Since the resale on an equipment trailer will be so much better (MOST people buying used landscape trailers are not looking to haul equipment with them, so the upgrades aren't as valuable to them), I see it as a better investment.
 

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Another thing that I've found with landscape trailers is that many of them have brakes standard on only one axle. By the time you "upgrade" the trailer with brakes on both axles and such, you're looking at about the same cost as an equipment trailer. Since the resale on an equipment trailer will be so much better (MOST people buying used landscape trailers are not looking to haul equipment with them, so the upgrades aren't as valuable to them), I see it as a better investment.
This particular issue isn't unique to landscape trailers. This is more about when the trailer was built and where it was originally sold. Every State has some sort of law about trailers and their brakes and those laws apply to all trailers. Lots of older "equipment trailers" also only have brakes on one axle.

As more and more of the States are requiring brakes on all wheels, the major manufacturers have followed suit and started building all of their trailers with brakes on all wheels. It's something to watch for on older/used trailers (of all types) and with off-brands that are only built/sold locally.
 

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This particular issue isn't unique to landscape trailers. This is more about when the trailer was built and where it was originally sold. Every State has some sort of law about trailers and their brakes and those laws apply to all trailers. Lots of older "equipment trailers" also only have brakes on one axle.

As more and more of the States are requiring brakes on all wheels, the major manufacturers have followed suit and started building all of their trailers with brakes on all wheels. It's something to watch for on older/used trailers (of all types) and with off-brands that are only built/sold locally.
my landscaper trailer was built with brakes on both axles and for no extra charge at time-2002-in va. along I-81 beside the the big muffler plant- can't remember name of town-brain freeze up. lol big jim yeah I ordered red paint-well they called and said it's in to the wife---but one problem, black paint somebody read the work order wrong, did it matter-wife said u might as well take it back and start over. had to wait another week till mine came back the right color.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
This particular issue isn't unique to landscape trailers. This is more about when the trailer was built and where it was originally sold. Every State has some sort of law about trailers and their brakes and those laws apply to all trailers. Lots of older "equipment trailers" also only have brakes on one axle.

As more and more of the States are requiring brakes on all wheels, the major manufacturers have followed suit and started building all of their trailers with brakes on all wheels. It's something to watch for on older/used trailers (of all types) and with off-brands that are only built/sold locally.
I agree that, as laws have made things tighter, manufacturers have followed suit with their trailers. Yet, MANY landscape trailers are still built with brakes on only one axle by default. Even though a dealer may only be able to sell new ones in a certain state with brakes on both axles, the older ones are out there with just one axle worth of brakes (remember - I'm considering used as well as new). Anything I would be willing to consider will have to have brakes on both axles, and that eliminates a large portion of the used market for landscape trailers for me. I won't consider much in the way of used equipment trailers more than a few years old because people want WAY too much money for them and they need a lot of work. For the same money, I can get a trailer that's much newer and in much better shape.
 

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We just had this discussion about how expensive used trailers are for what you pay on another forum. Everyone who had bought a trailer recently said it was a total waste of time to shop for a used trailer. Cheap trailers were junk, decent used trailers cost as much as new but still had years of weathering on decks, paint, tires.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
We just had this discussion about how expensive used trailers are for what you pay on another forum. Everyone who had bought a trailer recently said it was a total waste of time to shop for a used trailer. Cheap trailers were junk, decent used trailers cost as much as new but still had years of weathering on decks, paint, tires.
I remember going through the same type of process last time around and just ended up buying a new one for a few hundred bucks more. There are occasional "deals" out there, but they're few and far in between.
 

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Dual Axle Brakes on all four wheels on the Kaufman Trailers. Pulls real nice to, One down side is the Steak Pockets are not fully usable as the top rail passes right over the pockets. can be used as tie down points. Rate it an A- to a B+ for a trailer
 

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Discussion Starter #14
What are folks' thoughts on torsion versus more traditional axles on these kinds of trailers? My snowmobile trailer has a torsion axle and it pulls very nicely (nice and smooth) and I'm now seeing equipment trailers with them. My previous equipment trailer had the traditional leaf spring suspension setup and I never had any complaints about how it towed.

I'm concerned about the longevity of the suspension of a torsion axle for something that's designed to carry this much weight (including a heavy trailer). The upside is that they don't "break" like a leaf spring does, they'll just lose their ability to provide any actual suspension control. I honestly don't know if they're worth the hassle, ESPECIALLY with regard to a used trailer.
 

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A 7K trailer should have about a 5500# capacity. 16-18ft trailers weighs aprox 1500-1800#, add in the 10-15% of weight thats transfered to the tow vehicle via teh hitch you are left with around a 5500# payload capacity. This is plenty for a 2520 even with implements.

An 18ft would allow you to haul a car if needed or multiple implements or two tractors or.....
 

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What are folks' thoughts on torsion versus more traditional axles on these kinds of trailers? My snowmobile trailer has a torsion axle and it pulls very nicely (nice and smooth) and I'm now seeing equipment trailers with them. My previous equipment trailer had the traditional leaf spring suspension setup and I never had any complaints about how it towed.

I'm concerned about the longevity of the suspension of a torsion axle for something that's designed to carry this much weight (including a heavy trailer). The upside is that they don't "break" like a leaf spring does, they'll just lose their ability to provide any actual suspension control. I honestly don't know if they're worth the hassle, ESPECIALLY with regard to a used trailer.


I had a large 30ft GN with tandem 8000# torsion axles. If rode very nice and I never had a problem with the axles. I really liked as I built my toyhauler on it and used it for off road camping(as far off road as you can reasonably get with a 30ft trailer). With the torsion axles there were no axle tubes to get hung up on or u-bolts hanging down to snag when driving in deep ruts. I've never heard of a failure of one but have broken a few leaf springs and worn out hanger bolts. I'd buy one again.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
A 7K trailer should have about a 5500# capacity. 16-18ft trailers weighs aprox 1500-1800#, add in the 10-15% of weight thats transfered to the tow vehicle via teh hitch you are left with around a 5500# payload capacity. This is plenty for a 2520 even with implements.

An 18ft would allow you to haul a car if needed or multiple implements or two tractors or.....
If you're talking about landscape trailers in the 7k range, I would agree with you. Equipment trailers are closer to 2500lbs or more as they're built much more heavily. Still, even at 4500lbs cargo capacity for a 7k trailer, I think I have more than what I would need.
 

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You don't see a HD equipment trailer in the 7K, losing 2500# of your capacity would make it redundant. There is no point in making a 2500# trailer and putting a pair of 3500# axles under it as the payload capacity would be so low you wouldn't be able haul anything that would justify that heavy of a frame.

Even a 10K equipment trailer only weighs around 2000#.

My 18ft tilt deck car hauler was 1800# and that was due to the extra frame and parts for the tilt. The same trailer without the tilt with just a plain flat deck and slide out ramps was about 1200#. I'm guessing a landscape trailer would be somewhere in between that due to the sides.
 

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BTW if you plan to use the trailer a lot I'd go upto a 10K simply for the heftier tires, try to get something with 16" rims. My 7K tilt deck burned off the 205 load ranted "C" tires in one season(I run a small grass cutting company on the side). I upgraded to 215 "D" range tires and they lasted about 2 seasons.

Now I have 14K tilt deck with 235/85/r16s load range "E" and have 2 seasons on it. The tires were used when I got the trailer and still have tons of life left.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
You don't see a HD equipment trailer in the 7K, losing 2500# of your capacity would make it redundant. There is no point in making a 2500# trailer and putting a pair of 3500# axles under it as the payload capacity would be so low you wouldn't be able haul anything that would justify that heavy of a frame.

Even a 10K equipment trailer only weighs around 2000#.

My 18ft tilt deck car hauler was 1800# and that was due to the extra frame and parts for the tilt. The same trailer without the tilt with just a plain flat deck and slide out ramps was about 1200#. I'm guessing a landscape trailer would be somewhere in between that due to the sides.
I don't know what trailers you're looking at, but it's certainly not Anderson. Some of the 6k CAM trailers are 1500 lbs (shortest length), but that's about it. Anderson trailers start at well over 2500 and go up. The main reason I bought the 10k trailer and not the 7k trailer the last time was because the weight of the trailer itself, even on the 7k, was well over 2k and offered a good chunk smaller payload for almost no actual savings.
 
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