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Discussion Starter #1
All,

I have a question regarding how level the H120 quick attach bucket should be. As best as I can determine on level pavement, the left arm measured where the bucket attaches is slightly off, between 3/8" and 3/4", depending on how high the bucket is lifted. I know that when I lower the bucket to the floor it definitely touches on the left before the right. The tractor (1025R) only has 6 hrs on it, and the H120 was dealer installed. The tractor is level, the frame and H120 mounts are all level to the ground, and there is no damage or strain to the arms that I can find - they really haven't been worked all that hard yet. Just some scraping and pushing loose dirt around with a ratchet rake, and some light scooping and toting. I'm assuming it's been this way since delivery.

I've searched the forum for something on this, and did not come up with anything.

1. What is a reasonable tolerance on how level the bucket should be?

2. If mine is too far off, what is the best way to adjust the level?

Thanks.
 

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I think we are going to need a picture, if at all possible.
 
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Discussion Starter #3
I think we are going to need a picture, if at all possible.
Not sure a pic will show it - maybe I didn't explain it very weil - sorry. When I lift the FEL bucket off the ground, the right side is about 3/4" higher than the left side, measured from several points (bucket lower edge, quick attach bracket, etc). I first noticed it when I noticed that the left side always touches down before the right when lowering it. I'm wondering if it's a problem or within tolerance, and if a problem, can it be corrected and how? It's pouring now, but I'll try to get a pic later.
 

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I think mine has been like you are describing since day one. When I'm on a completely level surface, (concrete garage floor) and I pull back on the SCV, it seems like the right side of the bucket leaves the ground before the left. When touching the bucket to the ground, I believe the left side is the first to hit.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I think mine has been like you are describing since day one. When I'm on a completely level surface, (concrete garage floor) and I pull back on the SCV, it seems like the right side of the bucket leaves the ground before the left. When touching the bucket to the ground, I believe the left side is the first to hit.
Yes, I'm seeing that as well. What bothers me is, if this is due to uneven lift cylinder response, why would the bucket still be non level when it's fully lifted off the ground. Wouldn't both cylinders fully extend and equalize? Or, is 1/2 to 3/4" a normal tolerance for a setup like this? Just want to know if something is wrong.
 

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I'm a "tight tolerance" kind of guy too. But, they're just not perfectly level. Even if they were, the arms of your loader will sometimes lift / lower at slightly different rates and the attachment points for the bucket will also curl / uncurl at different rates. You're dealing with machining tolerances AND fluid flows.

Wait until you realize that your steering wheel is never "centered" properly and changes position. :)
 

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Here is a simple test, check the air pressure in the rear tires ;)

But, I think 3/8" and 3/4" would be considered normal.
 

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Wait until you realize that your steering wheel is never "centered" properly and changes position. :)
I noticed this and started freaking out. I like having the John deere that is engraved in the steering wheel to be readable on the right or left.... I can't remember which side, but oh well, the machine drives like a dream.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
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Discussion Starter #9
I'm a "tight tolerance" kind of guy too. But, they're just not perfectly level. Even if they were, the arms of your loader will sometimes lift / lower at slightly different rates and the attachment points for the bucket will also curl / uncurl at different rates. You're dealing with machining tolerances AND fluid flows.

Wait until you realize that your steering wheel is never "centered" properly and changes position. :)
Nooooo! Something else to obsess over! :)
 

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Here is a simple test, check the air pressure in the rear tires ;)

But, I think 3/8" and 3/4" would be considered normal.
I'll try that. I did measure the height of the frame at the FEL mount points off the ground and it is exactly the same on each side. BTW, I first noticed this from the seat when the bucket was fully raised - just didn't look right. If it doesn't change anymore, I guess it's just normal tolerance for something like that.

One thing - without knowing the tolerance of the bolt holes for the mounting flange to the frame, is it possible that one flange is slightly tilted forward or backward with respect to the other? I thought I read somewhere here that someone else noticed this. Wondering if that might make the difference. Anyone?
 
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I'll try that. I did measure the height of the frame at the FEL mount points off the ground and it is exactly the same on each side. BTW, I first noticed this from the seat when the bucket was fully raised - just didn't look right. If it doesn't change anymore, I guess it's just normal tolerance for something like that.

One thing - without knowing the tolerance of the bolt holes for the mounting flange to the frame, is it possible that one flange is slightly tilted forward or backward with respect to the other? I thought I read somewhere here that someone else noticed this. Wondering if that might make the difference. Anyone?
Sounds like a good science experiment to me. Give it a shot and let us know how it works out. :good2:
 

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Sounds like a good science experiment to me. Give it a shot and let us know how it works out. :good2:
Which experiment - tire inflation or fiddling with the mounts?
 

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Tire pressure is very sensitive on the one series. The rear tires need to be set properly and maintained at the same pressure as when the mower (if equipped) was installed and adjusted. Even with no loader, proper and balanced tire pressure is important. No science experiment there.

The real test is moving your mounts around a little to see if you can level your loader. Don't forget the blue loctite and a torque wrench for proper bolt torque and retention. :good2:
 

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Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
Tire pressure is very sensitive on the one series. The rear tires need to be set properly and maintained at the same pressure as when the mower (if equipped) was installed and adjusted. Even with no loader, proper and balanced tire pressure is important. No science experiment there.

The real test is moving your mounts around a little to see if you can level your loader. Don't forget the blue loctite and a torque wrench for proper bolt torque and retention. :good2:
OK, thanks. Tires first, then mounts - do the easy one first :good2: BTW, would it be foolish to adjust the FEL mounts while the loader is mounted? Just thinking it would be easier to test the results without having to mount and park over and over to test the effect of a tweak. Maybe just release the clamps and elevate a little without totally parking.
 

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Keep your tires pretty high up on your maintenance checklist. At least as often as you check your oil. :good2: Especially if you mow. It'll prevent mower connect/disconnect issues. :drinks:
 

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OK, thanks. Tires first, then mounts - do the easy one first :good2: BTW, would it be foolish to adjust the FEL mounts while the loader is mounted? Just thinking it would be easier to test the results without having to mount and park over and over to test the effect of a tweak. Maybe just release the clamps and elevate a little without totally parking.
I would remove the loader mechanically but not hydraulically. Do your adjustment and reattach the loader and test. Just be safe. Make sure you have enough room and control over the heavy parts. If not, remove the loader completely before attempting. It only takes one slip to get to the "I shoulda, coulda" stage if you know what I mean.
 

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If your rear tires are loaded (ballasted) make sure the tire valve stem is at the 12 o'clock position or it will get very messy!
Rear tires should be @20 psi and front tires should be @26 psi w/loader installed and 22 psi w/no loader installed.
I checked my loader mounting masts when I was having issues with the old parking stand hitting the tractor frame and found very little if any fore and aft tolerance (movement), retightened to 230 lb.ft.
For reference I just checked my loader bucket to ground for level and there is very little side to side difference.
 
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If your rear tires are loaded (ballasted) make sure the tire valve stem is at the 12 o'clock position or it will get very messy!
Rear tires should be @20 psi and front tires should be @26 psi w/loader installed and 22 psi w/no loader installed.
I checked my loader mounting masts when I was having issues with the old parking stand hitting the tractor frame and found very little if any fore and aft tolerance (movement), retightened to 230 lb.ft.
For reference I just checked my loader bucket to ground for level and there is very little side to side difference.
I didn't realize that we could go all the way to 26 psi on the fronts with the loader. I thought that the manual said something about 4 psi above the max which is 20, or maybe it's 22? LOL!

I think that I have mine at 20 psi even, so I need to pump up the fronts a bit more!
 

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Solution Number: 51173

Solution Summary: Bucket Does Not Contact Ground Evenly

Publication Date: Nov 12 2010

**Paper copies of solutions may not be the most current solutions**

Complaint or Symptom :

Bucket is uneven when contacting the ground.

Problem or Situation :

One corner of bucket contacts the ground before the other. There are four possible causes.

A. Tire inflation or wear is not equal.

B. Mounting frames are not level.

C. Mounting frames require adjustment.

D. Front arm of boom below the torque tube is possibly bent rearward. Catching one corner of bucket on an immovable object such as a catch basin cover at speed can cause this.

Solution :

A. Check tire inflation and measure distance from ground to centerline of hubs on each side of tractor they should be equal.

B. Check rear vertical surface of mounting frames on 500, 600, 700 and 800 series loader using a level, they should be equal from side to side. Loosen hardware and adjust if necessary.

C. On 200X & CX, 300 & X & CX, 400X & CX loaders, check if one mast is further forwards than the other. If this is the case, check mast cavity for excess material (MaterialLocation.pdf), loosen mounting frame hardware on that side only and lift front tires off the ground with the loader, retorque hardware. If this does not work, park loader, loosen parking stand support bolts, allow stand to settle and retorque.

D. Take the measurements as shown on the drawing below. Measurements are taken from the centre of the pins and compared from the left hand to the right hand side of the loader boom. Measurements should be close. Provide these measurements if opening a DTAC case.

Boom Measurements

If measurements are not close, remove attachment, locate a flat level surface and slowly lower loader to ground. If one holder contacts the ground before the other boom is possibly bent. Remove parking stands. Check for bent boom arm using a straight edge approximately three feet long. Lay straight edge on lower surface of boom arm between knee plate and toe of boom it should be straight with no gaps between surfaces. If there is a gap boom is bent. A good frame straightening shop should be able to correct condition.

Additional Information :

300X, 430, 210, 673, 553, 410, 512, H480, 400X, 200X, H120, 200CX, 300CX, 400CX, D120, 460, 563, 541, 420, 640, 740, 542, 300, 741, 521, 840, 620, 522, 721, 843, 305, 746, 726

FIT, CHECK, BENT, BOOM, FAIL, PERFORM, JDM MISC, WHEEL, BOOM, FRAME
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Solution Number: 51173

Solution Summary: Bucket Does Not Contact Ground Evenly

Publication Date: Nov 12 2010

**Paper copies of solutions may not be the most current solutions**

Complaint or Symptom :

Bucket is uneven when contacting the ground.

Problem or Situation :

One corner of bucket contacts the ground before the other. There are four possible causes.

A. Tire inflation or wear is not equal.

B. Mounting frames are not level.

C. Mounting frames require adjustment.

D. Front arm of boom below the torque tube is possibly bent rearward. Catching one corner of bucket on an immovable object such as a catch basin cover at speed can cause this.

Solution :

A. Check tire inflation and measure distance from ground to centerline of hubs on each side of tractor they should be equal.

B. Check rear vertical surface of mounting frames on 500, 600, 700 and 800 series loader using a level, they should be equal from side to side. Loosen hardware and adjust if necessary.

C. On 200X & CX, 300 & X & CX, 400X & CX loaders, check if one mast is further forwards than the other. If this is the case, check mast cavity for excess material (MaterialLocation.pdf), loosen mounting frame hardware on that side only and lift front tires off the ground with the loader, retorque hardware. If this does not work, park loader, loosen parking stand support bolts, allow stand to settle and retorque.

D. Take the measurements as shown on the drawing below. Measurements are taken from the centre of the pins and compared from the left hand to the right hand side of the loader boom. Measurements should be close. Provide these measurements if opening a DTAC case.

Boom Measurements

If measurements are not close, remove attachment, locate a flat level surface and slowly lower loader to ground. If one holder contacts the ground before the other boom is possibly bent. Remove parking stands. Check for bent boom arm using a straight edge approximately three feet long. Lay straight edge on lower surface of boom arm between knee plate and toe of boom it should be straight with no gaps between surfaces. If there is a gap boom is bent. A good frame straightening shop should be able to correct condition.

Additional Information :

300X, 430, 210, 673, 553, 410, 512, H480, 400X, 200X, H120, 200CX, 300CX, 400CX, D120, 460, 563, 541, 420, 640, 740, 542, 300, 741, 521, 840, 620, 522, 721, 843, 305, 746, 726

FIT, CHECK, BENT, BOOM, FAIL, PERFORM, JDM MISC, WHEEL, BOOM, FRAME
Thanks for this post. I note they say measurements "should be close". Wonder what they think close is? I had checked a bunch of these measurements already and found most to be within 1/4 to 3/8", and all bolts were torqued correctly.
 
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