Green Tractor Talk banner

61 - 70 of 70 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,371 Posts
I have this same problem, which I noticed while lifting mulch out of my truck's bed. I haven't measured the error yet, but I estimate 1"-1.5". Since I was working with lightweight mulch I wasn't concerned, but it did get me thinking: If I am working with heavy material, will this put undue strain on one half of the loader "system" if the bucket isn't level? (be it the loader frame, cylinder, or whatever)
Based upon the knowledge that this is common AND I know of no failures of this type, I would say this is not something to be concerned about.

Countless times I have loaded the bucket to full capacity unevenly. I'm not at all worried about a structural failure, just need to be careful not to tip over sideways.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,975 Posts
I have this same problem, which I noticed while lifting mulch out of my truck's bed. I haven't measured the error yet, but I estimate 1"-1.5". Since I was working with lightweight mulch I wasn't concerned, but it did get me thinking: If I am working with heavy material, will this put undue strain on one half of the loader "system" if the bucket isn't level? (be it the loader frame, cylinder, or whatever)
Depends on what tractor you have and a lot of factors honestly, but Id make sure your rear tires are the same OD, by measuring them.
Make sure your air pressure is correct too. After that, check it on a known FLAT surface. Some concrete isnt. Then measure the difference with a tape.

Then check your truck. My truck bed sits a bit unlevel anyway, so thats not really a good test.

In my case, my 2025 was this way, and the rear tires were different ODs. Quite a bit different actually.
Once the tires were replaced, all is well now.

As to undue strain on one side or another, not much of a concern, the loader isnt always square to the load going in the bucket, nor when dragging material.
Unless you put its max capacity in one corner, I wouldnt worry too much. Even then, if its too much for it to take, it wont lift it.
As long as you arent using it as a bulldozer, I wouldnt worry about undue strain.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
I have a 2018 1025R with a 120R loader and I have been pondering this problem since I got my equipment (233 hours ago). On a level surface there is about 3/4" to 1" difference and it seems like it's in the loader frame. I have some 8 ft. pine trees that I planted this spring and I water them by filling the bucket and hauling it to them. The water level tells the tale very well. The only answers I got from my dealer were "they all do that".
My question is about possible adjustments to the loader arms. The pivot bolts have an eccentric on the end. I have seen this type of device with two different uses: one is for adjustment purposes and the other is as a locking device. Which is this? Is it for making minor adjustments to compensate for slight differences in the two arms? Of course, the owner's manual doesn't mention them.
755878


I don't want to do any shimming or bending that might cause any stress on the structure. It sure would be nice if a little wrench work could shift things just a little bit.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
79 Posts
First thing to check is the diameter of your rear tires. I can't think of an example on this forum where that was not the problem.

Bias tires have quite a range of diameter where they still meet the spec. If you get two tires where one is at the top of the tolerance and the other at the bottom you will see what you are experiencing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
The tires are fine and equal. Air pressure is correct. Measurements on the frame are equal from side to side. My problem is a fault with the loader.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,247 Posts
I am working with my dealer regarding the cross pin on my 120R. The holes are wobbled out a bit and the bucket lift arms (1) are not in sync. If you have lifted with the bucket and maybe twisted the bucket a bit the lift points (1) will conform to the bucket and with no load you'll see a difference. You can check your pin (1) by taking the bucket off, raising the loader, then shut off the tractor and relieve a bit of pressure. You can now move the attachment points to check for slop.

#4 in the diagram below;

762576
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
112 Posts
I may be in this group too. I've noticed for some time that the right hand quick connect arm (#1 in the diagram above) has been a little lower than the left. I can catch the left JDQA "hook" quicker than the right. In describing the issue I keep hearing Dire Straits "Industrial Disease" (he's got brewer's droop from drinking beer") in my head.

So today as I was taking the bucket off I put a tape measure to it. It appears that the right hand hydraulic cylinder is out a little over an inch more than the left hand. See pictures below. With measuring the cylinder rams exposure I think that rules out issues with tire pressure. I haven't measured the lift cylinders.

This doesn't seem to be an issue until I am attaching or detaching from the loader but it also makes me wonder if one cylinder is doing more work than the other when I'm using the loader. I've let the dealer know about this (less than 40 hours on the tractor). Is there something about this that I can do or is this nothing to be concerned about? I'm wondering if cycling the curl cylinders without anything attached will get the cylinders to even out. Shouldn't they auto-balance? Or should I push this into the dealer's court?

Thanks!
Brian
PXL_20201121_233734625.jpg

762863
762866
762864
 

·
Senior GTT Super Slacker
Joined
·
39,087 Posts
This doesn't seem to be an issue until I am attaching or detaching from the loader but it also makes me wonder if one cylinder is doing more work than the other when I'm using the loader.
Do a maximum dump (Cylinders extended all the way) I'm pretty sure you'll find they are both the same.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
112 Posts
At maximum dump and max curl they even out. But even after a few cycles they aren't even through the stroke. Here's what my local sales guy said in response to my email:

What you are seeing is very common on any loader. It happens because of the way that the hydraulic fluid is routed down the loader. It comes down one side of the loader and fills that hydraulic cylinder 1st and then runs fluid to the other side. So the side that fills 1st always is a little ahead of the other side.

To help this difference out, John Deere put a round bar (1.) from one end to the other and put a pin through it (2.) on each side.
763295


I guess it's all normal then. I had assumed there was some sort of balancing valve that kept the cylinders even. Apparently, I was.....wrong.

Still learning.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Gizmo2
61 - 70 of 70 Posts
Top