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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
We just had a hail storm move through. Sure can worry a person. The lightning was very intense.

I haven't checked the wheat and corn fields to see how they look.

Can someone tell me why motorists don't have common sense to slow down when there's 2 to 3 inches+ of hail on the roads? The goof balls were still trying to go 35 & 40 mph. Well, at least they keep the body shops, insurance adjusters, and EMT's busy. :laugh: They certainly did this morning.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Went and checked on another property of mine. The big Live Oak trees don't look so good with the leaves stripped off. They'll recover, just have a lot to clean up. Had quarter size hail there. We normally only get pea size hail stones and rarely ever this much. There's much to be thankful for, because other places to the west get baseball and grapefruit size hail.
 

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We just had a hail storm move through. Sure can worry a person. The lightning was very intense.

I haven't checked the wheat and corn fields to see how they look.

Can someone tell me why motorists don't have common sense to slow down when there's 2 to 3 inches+ of hail on the roads? The goof balls were still trying to go 35 & 40 mph. Well, at least they keep the body shops, insurance adjusters, and EMT's busy. :laugh: They certainly did this morning.
That was some storm 2-3" hail, that will do some damage to your house roof , siding, crops and anything else outside.
Yea they can't slow down and not smart enough to know or care they should turn there headlights on. Day time Running lights are not headlights and auto headlights 90% of the time don't turn on the headlights ..
 

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The hail you say!:laugh: Last time we had that much hail (about 12 years ago) it took the phone company months to restore proper phone service. One lightning strike gave everyone in the neighborhood an old fashioned "party line", you just picked up the phone and everybody was talking already. That lasted over a week...

"Slow down? I can't slow down, I have to be going fast so's I can text right!"
 

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. . . I haven't checked the wheat and corn fields to see how they look. . . .
Hail can do a 'hailuva' lot of damage . . . :hand: :rain: :hide: :snow:

That said, I wonder if you guys in Texas have corn crops up enough that you could suffer damage from a hailstorm ?

We haven't even planted corn yet in Tennessee. :think:

Winter wheat is looking good though.
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Hail can do a 'hailuva' lot of damage . . . :hand: :rain: :hide: :snow:

That said, I wonder if you guys in Texas have corn crops up enough that you could suffer damage from a hailstorm ?

We haven't even planted corn yet in Tennessee. :think:

Winter wheat is looking good though.
Not everybody here has their corn planted. It's mostly less than 5 inches tall right now. Looks like most of it is going to make it, including the wheat. Just still have lots to clean up around the trees.

This thread just reminded me of something I saw last year. A cousin of mine was dying of cancer in Oregon, and myself and a family member were headed there by way of rental car to try and see my cousin before she passed. Considering the mileage up there and back, we figured it was better to just rent a car, since we needed to bring several items with us and also bring additional items back. The car we ended up with was brand new. Even the car dealers didn't yet have this 2013 model yet.

We made it to Colorado and experienced a glitch with the electronics. Gave the car rental place a call and they said to stop at Colorado Springs and try to exchange the car there. Man oh man, if you could've seen what all the cars on their lot looked like after a terrible hail storm!!! What a mess! Ended up not being able to get another vehicle there or at any of the other nearby locations and instead had to turn around and go to Pueblo to get a dealer to correct the problem. Had just got word that my cousin had passed away. That and then dealing with the car problem, the fatigue from driving so many miles under pressure while trying to get to Oregon on time and adjusting to the altitude made that trip very interesting.
 

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Not everybody here has their corn planted. It's mostly less than 5 inches tall right now. Looks like most of it is going to make it, including the wheat. Just still have lots to clean up around the trees.
Interesting how latitude affects planting time . . . guess it's mainly due to temperature and freeze probability in early spring.

Recall a prairie dog hunting trip to Littlefield, TX during drought conditions in July a few years ago. Hot down there!

Was absolutely amazed at how stunted the dryland cotton seemed as compared to the cotton crop in NW Tennessee. The irrigated fields looked OK. Talked with a couple cotton farmers at a restaurant one night and they said they were used to it and that some years they got very low yields which resulted in less than a breakeven situation.

Farming is truly a gamble . . . :)
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Interesting how latitude affects planting time . . . guess it's mainly due to temperature and freeze probability in early spring.

Recall a prairie dog hunting trip to Littlefield, TX during drought conditions in July a few years ago. Hot down there!

Was absolutely amazed at how stunted the dryland cotton seemed as compared to the cotton crop in NW Tennessee. Talked with a couple cotton farmers at a restaurant one night and they said they were used to it and that some years they got very low yields which resulted in less than a breakeven situation.

Farming is truly a gamble . . . :)
Oh yeah, the heat can be really hard to take and I'm used to it, but it still gets to me. Your mention of dryland cotton made me instantly think of the farmers in the panhandle of Texas. That is something I want no part of. Those that can't irrigate have to plant cotton among the stalks of another crop to try and keep it from being sandblasted. I've been in the panhandle during storms and it can be frightening. There's nothing to block the wind like other areas of the state where the land isn't flat. If you get a chance, look up the history of the Dust Bowl years, especially around Dalhart, Texas. It's hard to picture the massive piles of sand that accumulated during the dust storms. It took months for them to be spread out and graded off.

One of my uncles grew up on a farm outside of Greenville, TX. He's deceased now, but learned to farm alongside his dad and two brothers while using mules. He showed me not long before he died where the farm was at and how it had been divided up and sold off long after his family sold it. His dad for some reason thought that they should try their luck with farming in the panhandle near Lubbock. From what I recall my uncle saying about it, his dad said they could buy land near Lubbock for much less money. I suppose it was the picture of having a farm that was several times larger that made it more appealing.

I have some pics of one year when they were picking cotton. My uncle said it was very hard trying to grow cotton near Lubbock. He told me about one time when several of them were each on John Deere tractors and were planting cotton. A dust storm rolled in and caught them by surprise. This would've been in the 1940's I believe. Not sure on the total number of years they had that farm. It was in the 1950's when the deep irrigation wells were being drilled in that dry part of Texas. Probably wouldn't be a bad business to be in as far as selling irrigation equipment in that part of the country.
 
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