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I have a potential project which would require me to spread about 120 yards of crushed aggregate. Effectively, I would be building a walking path over about a 900 foot area, which would be about 6' wide. I have spread top soil and box bladed it quite successfully even cutting a taper into a lawn area to change the drainage. But I am wondering if anyone has spread or dealt with large amounts of crushed aggregate or crushed asphalt with the 1 series, between the FEL and the box blade.

I don't have any reason to doubt the machine can handle it, just curious if anyone has actually dealt with larger scale moving and positioning of the crushed concrete with the 1 series. It looks like I will have to have the aggregate dumped right off the pavement and I will have to move it with the FEL. I will deposit bucket piles every 6 or 8' and then use the box blade to spread them. I did find that I am much better at box blading forward than I am when trying to push the piles with the rear of the box blade, or at least that was the case with the 13 yards of top soil I just spread.
 

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how big is this box blade? its gonna take some time, even with a big blade. I owuld start by spreading the gravel with the bucket, and then grade it and smooth it with the box blade.
 

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It seems to me that the key to successful box blading is material flow. Is the crushed aggregate cohesive, and how big are the chunks? Does it flow with minimal shear, or is it a tangled mess? I don't have any experience with it, but that is my first thought.
 

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how big is this box blade? its gonna take some time, even with a big blade. I owuld start by spreading the gravel with the bucket, and then grade it and smooth it with the box blade.
It's the 48" box blade from Frontier. I plan to drop the aggregate and spread it with the bucket as much as realistic and hopefully, start right at the pile so as I am driving back and forth from the dump pile location, I am compacting the aggregate I just spread. Originally, the plan was to have the dump truck drop the piles in 10 yard loads by starting with the top of the hill, which is 450 feet from the pavement, but with the ground wet, I don't think the dump truck can get off the pavement without creating a huge mess for me to repair and deal with.

The 1 series doesn't have a ton of ground clearance and it doesn't like driving through dump truck tire ruts, that's for sure........So I will have him dump, I will spread and by time he can return with the next load, I should be largely waiting for him........Obviously, as I reach the other end, its going to be more time consuming going back and forth, but hopefully, it just makes the path more compact and smooth it out. It's a narrow area to work in and through trees, down a hill, etc. so larger equipment would be handicapped in some respects.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
It seems to me that the key to successful box blading is material flow. Is the crushed aggregate cohesive, and how big are the chunks? Does it flow with minimal shear, or is it a tangled mess? I don't have any experience with it, but that is my first thought.
It's crushed pretty fine, I would say 3/4" to 1" seems to be most of the stone. I have never box bladed this specific material but I have with just general gravel and it went pretty well.....
 

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It's crushed pretty fine, I would say 3/4" to 1" seems to be most of the stone. I have never box bladed this specific material but I have with just general gravel and it went pretty well.....
i'd say you'll be fine. I would take a scoop out of the pile and dump it out in front of you as you drive along so that it doesn't make a mud mess. The box blade will smooth and grade that just fine.
 

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i'd say you'll be fine. I would take a scoop out of the pile and dump it out in front of you as you drive along so that it doesn't make a mud mess. The box blade will smooth and grade that just fine.
I agree, my driveway is 1"- crusher run, my box blade did a great job on that. Last year I worked it all loose and smoothed it back out, to this day my neighbor still thinks I had spread a fresh load out. I am redoing it with limestone crusher run, 3/4"- in a few weeks, the box blade is exactly the right tool for a job like you have. :good2:
 

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I'm almost through spreading 50 tons of #57 (3/4" to 1") crushed gravel with the 1025r bucket and box blade. I made sure to take my time and not get in a hurry. Started out with the FEL and then went over it with the blade. I had it angled higher in the front and used it going forward (pulling). I don't like to use it backwards because of the pressure it puts on the lift arms, etc.
 

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In short, as others have said, the tractor will handle the job fine grading and finishing. You will use the front bucket as much as the back. I have pulled my 5' box blade with my 1025r in gravel, and it did fine.

If you can't find a material cart or some other machine to rent to transport the gravel in larger volumes per run(that won't sink), then be sure and use your ballast box, loaded heavy, when carrying the gravel to the pathway. Crushed aggregate is much heavier by volume than any dirt by comparison.

If you do have the dump trucks drive in further, have them dump in one spot, approx. halfway in the project, and do so without turning around, or steering at all. When they start steering is when things go awry. Be mindful of utilities, and septic systems, this stuff won't be located on the customer's side, it will be up to them and you to know where things are.

If the gravel won't hold still while grading, water it then grade it, or find, rent, or make some kind smooth roller drum compactor to pull with your tractor. This will make the gravel lay down and hold still, it will look completely different after rolling it and will grade different. Wacker makes small gas powered ride on drum rollers that you can rent, I would get one of those.

About the numbers:

One way we bid it roughly is: A 14 ton 10 wheeler load of 1.5" crusher run gated out will do 75 linear feet, 4" thick, nominal width of the truck.

When bidding pads or bigger stuff, most crushers will tell you 3000 lbs. per cubic yard, on all of their materials, irregardless of size. Thru experience and many jobs, we use 3500 lbs. per cubic yard, and get really close on our volumes. This really matters when you are doing 2000 loads and the aggregate costs $95/load for just the material.

Most dirt is 2200-2800 lbs. per cubic yard. When I leave the crusher loaded, my bed is only 3/4 full of gravel. Remember what I said about using your ballast box?

Good luck.
 

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i'd say you'll be fine. I would take a scoop out of the pile and dump it out in front of you as you drive along so that it doesn't make a mud mess. The box blade will smooth and grade that just fine.
I do this. I fill the box blade and then when the box is almost empty I start to dump the bucket.


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Discussion Starter #13
Is it possible to have the truck driver tailgate it? We have had Tri axle drivers even tailgate crushed limestone backing up.
Originally, that was the plan when I was planning on doing this in the winter when the ground was all frozen. I had to wait on a couple of people to decide and now, of course they are ready after all of the conditions changed. I increased my machine hour estimate for the project by 6 hours because before, I was planning on having the driver back to the top of the hill and start dumping and tailgating the material to largely reduce my labor. Now, I am afraid if he leaves the pavement, we will need a sky hook to get him out.....

So, I increased the labor portion by 6 hours and also added another 10 yards of material, figuring I am going to compact 10% into the soil now with the conditions. I also have their agreement to permit up to 25% more material if needed as the area has some long unresolved wash outs and we need to get those filled. It's nearly impossible to estimate the material needed to fill in a washed out area because of the varying depth, width, etc.

i'd say you'll be fine. I would take a scoop out of the pile and dump it out in front of you as you drive along so that it doesn't make a mud mess. The box blade will smooth and grade that just fine.

I will document the process in photo's and who knows, maybe another video that I one day will have to learn how to post on Youtube so others can see it....
 

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I have moved about 50 tons with my 1023e loader and a grader blade. To be honest, yes it can be done but it just takes some time. I was moving the pile about 50-75ft for my barn pad/driveway and gave up and got a larger tractor from the farm to move the remaining 80 tons of stone. As far as the stone side, I wouldn't worry. Your tractor will move it. I have also moved about 15 tons of rip rap with no problems. I do not think that stone size is an issue.

I prefer the loader for this type of work because I can really control and smooth out the gravel. You may be a better operator with the box blade than I am with a grader blade but I felt for the precision work I could do a better job with the loader.

I will say the good thing about about one series is its lighter weight so you can drive where larger machines cannot, which sounds like a real benefit for you right now.
 

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never worked with a 1 series.......but done a lot of gravel spreading and grading...

working out of a dump truck pile is going to take some time with your loader ...not sure your bucket size and capacity but it will be a lot of trips....obviously further is worse...

box blade is the right tool for final finish grading

seems to me your going to spend a lot of time hauling gravel.....not much time grading it out.....from a estimating time standpoint
 

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Discussion Starter #16
In short, as others have said, the tractor will handle the job fine grading and finishing. You will use the front bucket as much as the back. I have pulled my 5' box blade with my 1025r in gravel, and it did fine.

If you can't find a material cart or some other machine to rent to transport the gravel in larger volumes per run(that won't sink), then be sure and use your ballast box, loaded heavy, when carrying the gravel to the pathway. Crushed aggregate is much heavier by volume than any dirt by comparison.

If you do have the dump trucks drive in further, have them dump in one spot, approx. halfway in the project, and do so without turning around, or steering at all. When they start steering is when things go awry. Be mindful of utilities, and septic systems, this stuff won't be located on the customer's side, it will be up to them and you to know where things are.

If the gravel won't hold still while grading, water it then grade it, or find, rent, or make some kind smooth roller drum compactor to pull with your tractor. This will make the gravel lay down and hold still, it will look completely different after rolling it and will grade different. Wacker makes small gas powered ride on drum rollers that you can rent, I would get one of those.

About the numbers:

One way we bid it roughly is: A 14 ton 10 wheeler load of 1.5" crusher run gated out will do 75 linear feet, 4" thick, nominal width of the truck.

When bidding pads or bigger stuff, most crushers will tell you 3000 lbs. per cubic yard, on all of their materials, irregardless of size. Thru experience and many jobs, we use 3500 lbs. per cubic yard, and get really close on our volumes. This really matters when you are doing 2000 loads and the aggregate costs $95/load for just the material.

Most dirt is 2200-2800 lbs. per cubic yard. When I leave the crusher loaded, my bed is only 3/4 full of gravel. Remember what I said about using your ballast box?

Good luck.
Would you use the crushed concrete to fill in the wash out areas or would you use road bed gravel, which has the dirt component in it? Perhaps "Road Bed" gravel isn't the right term, but what i mean is the gravel typical used as "construction gravel", which isn't exclusively stone and has dirt.

I was thinking the crushed aggregate would compact better in the wash out valley's and also, it wouldn't have the dirt to be subject to wash out as the gravel would. I am going to cover the area repaired with crushed aggregate so I was considering just using the crushed aggregate to also fill in the wash out areas.

I plan on hanging 8 #42 pound suitcase weights on my box blade for rear ballast. That should put the rear weight at about 336 pounds for the suitcase weights, 75 pounds for the IMatch and another 275 pounds for the box blade for a total of just under 700 pounds. Now that I think about it, I think I have the the 60" box blade, which weighs a little more, so just over 700 pounds.

Wonder why Frontier lists the Operating weight of the Box blade at 275 pounds and the shipping weight at 636 pounds? That sure is some heavy packing material......at 361 pounds.....:laugh::lol: I noticed all of their box blades show a similar discrepancy in weight.

The Woods 60" box blade weighs 516 pounds where the 54" woods weighs 486 pounds, it's hard to believe the Frontier Box Blade weighs 200 pounds less. I had to move it the other day and it sure feels like its much heavier than the 275 pounds listed in the Frontier material (I used to be able to bench press 360 and military press 340 so moving weight is not unknown to me.:laugh:)
 

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When bidding pads or bigger stuff, most crushers will tell you 3000 lbs. per cubic yard, on all of their materials, irregardless of size. Thru experience and many jobs, we use 3500 lbs. per cubic yard, and get really close on our volumes.
We figure on 1.5 tons per cubic yard. That Oklahoma rock must be some heavy stuff.......:hide: :)
 

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you didnt ask me but....Dirty Base Rock is what we call road bed gravel here its 3/4 rock down to powder from top of quarry where there are dirt/clay streaks ....

any Base Rock ..requires compaction ...and makes a much better finsh and will get hard when moisture is added ....it will NOT flow water through it or control wash areas..

for example I use base rock vibratory tamped under asphalt...concrete slabs...or as a driveway product

i use 3/4 clean gravel for locations that are load bearing but do not require or its not advantagious to compact as its self compacting ....such as foundation back fill...also under concrete slabs etc

for soft muddy areas...soft road bases....roads that require drainage the first layer is always 1.5 clean or larger ....then cover with something like a base rock........1.5 or larger will stabilize most muddy soils and also drain water through if needed

the above applies to angular quarried crushed rock only ...not rounded creek gravel products

products mentioned and defined (products varry by location IE some quarries only produce Base in a 1">0 product)

dirty base......3/4 >0 crushed rock with clay component
clean base.......3/4>0 crushed rock
3/4 clean.........3/4......screened crushed rock
1.5 clean..........1.5....screened crushed rock

clean rock is considered NON compactable due to air gaps ......only Base rock products are considered Compactable and testable as such

NOTE: as ROCK SIZE gets larger it gets harder to deal with ..IE Scoup with a loader and spread...small is easy...large is hard
 

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Would you use the crushed concrete to fill in the wash out areas or would you use road bed gravel, which has the dirt component in it? Perhaps "Road Bed" gravel isn't the right term, but what i mean is the gravel typical used as "construction gravel", which isn't exclusively stone and has dirt.

I was thinking the crushed aggregate would compact better in the wash out valley's and also, it wouldn't have the dirt to be subject to wash out as the gravel would. I am going to cover the area repaired with crushed aggregate so I was considering just using the crushed aggregate to also fill in the wash out areas.
A washed, crushed stone should be fairly clean of dirt. A crusher run material will still have the fines, which will wash away with time and just leave the stone behind.
 
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