Green Tractor Talk banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
304 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Anyone have any ideas on how to capture HDMI video and store 24/7 recordings for 10-15 days at a time?
The reason I am asking is because I was thinking about bypassing my icloud service for my home security cameras. I have a very nice 6 camera 4k high def PoE system and I pay over $400 per year to store the video in the cloud additional to the local NVR storage. I want to just capture the video from the HMDI that goes to my tv and send it to a secondary storage that I could hide. I know that the picture could not be split into the individual cameras at that point from that secondary storage but if its 1080p quality, it would just have all 6 cameras would be on the screen at the same time. Hopefully, it would still produce good enough video to playback if necessary.
I have done some research but I could spend days and days looking at possible options. And I know that this site is loaded with very smart folks whom have a vast array of knowledge so I thought I would ask the group to save some time and to possibly come up with some very creative options ......

Thanks

:question: :unknown:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,934 Posts
Not exactly what you are asking but what kind of cameras? Brand and Model.

Since they are POE they have an IP Address. If they use a standard format there are some options to intercept the signal and dump to a PC.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,934 Posts
I should add that there are a few HDMI capture options that I know of but the challenge is they are more designed for manual interaction. You are going to want to automate it so a new file is created at certain intervals. Maybe 1 hr or 30 min. The easier part is to set up an automated process to say if the file is older than XX days to delete it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
304 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
I was not thinking about a computer option as if the house was broken into, they would most likely just take it too. I am just looking to record the HDMI video that comes off the NVR(DVR) and store it. I have seen some production video type equipment that stores video on SSD drives that could work. I was just looking for other options or if anyone else had any suggestions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
357 Posts
If your NVR is providing PoE, you could get a seperate switch with PoE to supply the cameras, otherwise the NVR really only needs one ethernet line (running to a hub/switch) & power. You can stow it some place hidden + hardened to avoid detection & easy access that is well away from the camera PoE hub (maybe a fire rated safe? You could even run the lines in via the base). There would be nothing to distinguish a line running to a camera vs one running to the NVR so the connecting cable would not be a giveaway. Use a PC or other device for real time monitoring via a display, not the direct output from the NVR.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
309 Posts
If your cameras are IP cameras, you can use Blue Iris software on a PC or easier get a Network Attached Storage (NAS) drive from someone like Synology that basically connects to the IP cameras directly and records everything they see all day long. The NAS uses two or more "red" drives which are built to run 24/7.

I have six IP cameras at my house. All are Foscam cameras at the moment. I have a Synology disk station NAS with two 1TB drives mirrored (one fails other has all the same data). I'm running synology's Surveillance Station software that monitors the IPcameras and records 24/7 what they see. It also tracks when the cameras are "triggered" by motion making playback of the whole day's video easy if necessary. The NAS comes with two licenses for cameras, and you have to buy more to use the software to monitor more cameras. You can buy the licenses on Amazon and I'm sure other places.

My IP cameras also send me three snapshots to my webmail account every time they are triggered. That allows me to see real time when something is going on around the house.

The NAS also holds the daily backups of all of my computers at the house. System images, etc. I could use it as a media server too, but I don't do that. The different disk stations have different processors and hardware to be faster or slower depending on how much you want them to do. Mine is an older model DS214+ that is good for storage but not so great for streaming video and media to TVs. Every one of Synology's NAS's have specs giving the number of ip cameras they can support. I think mine supports up to 16.

Here's a screenshot of the BlueIRIS software:



My Foscam cameras brought up locally using Foscam's software:

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,934 Posts
I was not thinking about a computer option as if the house was broken into, they would most likely just take it too. I am just looking to record the HDMI video that comes off the NVR(DVR) and store it. I have seen some production video type equipment that stores video on SSD drives that could work. I was just looking for other options or if anyone else had any suggestions.
If you store it on a video equipment that is just as easily stolen as a computer. The computer can just be the interface to capture the video and store it wherever. Maybe that is some online storage product or maybe it is a well hidden removable hard drive or network attached storage device. If they grab the computer, odds are they are in a hurry and are not going to trace down every USB cable to see what is on the other end. They are after the bigger ticket items. If it is NAS then it could be anywhere that has network access and power.

The other challenge is going to be how willing are you to dive into technology? Sure this can be done but I work in IT and am comfortable in Linux and the variants that the average person doesn't use. There are probably cheap options but they will take a lot of leg work to get them up and running so you "pay" for it in the back end. Consider it a time cost rather than a dollar cost. I like to try and put a dollar figure on my time to help justify paying someone to do something or buying a tool vs a free or lower cost open source solution. There are other options that are more expensive, that you might just hook up and it works but it might not do everything you want. For instance you mentioned having 6 cameras that do 4K video. You could combine all six images into a single 1080 video that is tiled but is that going to retain video of the quality needed to be of any value? I guess that depends on what you are recording. If it is a camera up in the corner of a warehouse you could see that someone was there taking something but that is probably going to be about it. If there is a camera pretty close to the point of entrance then it might provide enough detail to be of value for LEO.

Really a lot of times people look at some of these problems like computers or technology are some magical thing. At a high level much of this can be equated to other things like tractors, this is a John Deere Forum after-all. Do you want to spend a little more for an IMatch along with all the green 3pt attachments and have everything just work? It might cost more but you don't have to think about it. Your other option is to go out and buy a Harbor Freight Quick Hitch and every color attachment under the sun to fill out your needs. That may mean that each attachment doesn't quite fit the Quick Hitch. Through some custom fabrication you might adapt all the parts to work but it might not be as clean as the all green option and it takes time. If you don't have the tools or the skill set to make the modifications, would you have been better to just go with the green stuff? The benefit is that maybe one of those different colored attachments might do the job a little better than the green version. Maybe that is the original and the green one is just a clone. There might be $$$ savings in this route but fabrication takes time. What is your time worth? Really all of this applies just about everything IT as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,934 Posts
If your cameras are IP cameras, you can use Blue Iris software on a PC or easier get a Network Attached Storage (NAS) drive from someone like Synology that basically connects to the IP cameras directly and records everything they see all day long. The NAS uses two or more "red" drives which are built to run 24/7.

I have six IP cameras at my house. All are Foscam cameras at the moment. I have a Synology disk station NAS with two 1TB drives mirrored (one fails other has all the same data). I'm running synology's Surveillance Station software that monitors the IPcameras and records 24/7 what they see. It also tracks when the cameras are "triggered" by motion making playback of the whole day's video easy if necessary. The NAS comes with two licenses for cameras, and you have to buy more to use the software to monitor more cameras. You can buy the licenses on Amazon and I'm sure other places.

My IP cameras also send me three snapshots to my webmail account every time they are triggered. That allows me to see real time when something is going on around the house.

The NAS also holds the daily backups of all of my computers at the house. System images, etc. I could use it as a media server too, but I don't do that. The different disk stations have different processors and hardware to be faster or slower depending on how much you want them to do. Mine is an older model DS214+ that is good for storage but not so great for streaming video and media to TVs. Every one of Synology's NAS's have specs giving the number of ip cameras they can support. I think mine supports up to 16.

Here's a screenshot of the BlueIRIS software:



My Foscam cameras brought up locally using Foscam's software:

Something like this is what I had in mind. I don't know if it is compatible with every IP Based camera system out there but something like this would be much better than simply trying to grab a 1080 stream from a HDMI Camera.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
304 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Guys, sennister & wjfawb0, thanks for the info. This is very helpful and I will look into it further.

This is why I already love this site. There are so many folks on here with such a varied background and everyone is so helpful !!!


Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,934 Posts
Guys, sennister & wjfawb0, thanks for the info. This is very helpful and I will look into it further.

This is why I already love this site. There are so many folks on here with such a varied background and everyone is so helpful !!!


Thanks
Not a problem. The one thing you might run into is not every camera is 100% compatible with these other recording solutions. For instance, I know you don't have one but lets say you had a Nest camera. Well they want you to pay for their on going service. The service backend is where they make the real money. Sometimes they lock down the cameras or use special codecs (formatting) that doesn't follow an industry standard. This is good for them in terms of locking you into, I think you said $400/year, but bad for you if you wanted to at some point reduce costs.

Just a heads up that yes, there are options out there. They won't work in 100% of the cases. So if there is a program you are looking at like the one above, try a free version first or look at the make and model of the camera and check with them to see if it is compatible before forking out a bunch of money on a software package or investing in a NAS or other external storage device.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top