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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We just bought a farm in WV with 45 acres. The land around the house is level (one acre) and I have five acres in hay across the street which the farmer down the road takes care of it for his cattle. Out back I have 40 acres with access through two different lanes, one being steeper then the other one. I have three fields, which I figure to be around seven acres. The land is flat around the edges of the fields with moderate inclines or declines which ever way you look at it.
I need help in deciding which tractor would be suited for this type of terrain. I intend on keeping it clean and plant food plots for hunting once I move in. Tony
 

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Welcome to DT!

I think you will need a minimum of a 4x20 series, if not a 5 series for that much acreage. A cab would be great also. I think you will also need a L&G tractor to take care of that area around the house.

Do you have a budget in mind?
 

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I concur with Kenny on this one. Any chance you can get the farmer to do more hay on some of your remaining acreage? It would mean less for you to take care of.
 

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I'm a little confused (which is about normal for me :laugh:) as to how much cleared land you have to maintain. Are the 3 fields 7 acres each, or are they a total of 7 acres?

I'm on 53 acres with about 35 or so in hay that a farmer takes care of. So I use my 4520 (with cab) to mow a bunch of little areas in the .25 to 4 acre size, mow over two dams, and use a sickle mower to trim around the fields after the hay is cut to keep the woods from creeping in. I also use the sickle bar to do the slopes of the dam. There are a lot of slopes on the land- it's the "hilly-est" area the farmer hays. The trees average about 8 inches, but there are some old trees that are up to 24". The driveway is gravel, and there are very few trees next to it (by choice).

So I've probably got about 8 acres that gets mowed on way or another, and another acre or so close to the house.

I use my JD 318 garden tractor for around close to the house. I also use it for the very occasional snow fall. I use the 4520 with a 6' rotary cutter (MX6) for the other areas, including two fields (total of 4 acres) that get cut once a year. Before I had the 4520, I used the 318 to mow. I about killed it. After 3 years the spindle bearings, which I had replaced so they were new, were shot. So my mow time was more than cut in half with the 4520, and I was cutting much more. The garden tractor - utility tractor mix is great. You just have to have this idea of "Lawn - yard - field" that gets cut "nicely - grass isn't too long - Once a year".

For me, it was between the 2x20 and the 4x20. The 3x20 didn't seem wide enough. My B21 TLB is similar to the 2x20 series, and due to it's small size it's close to the ground and works great on hills. It's also open station, lowering the center of gravity a bit (or so it seems). So while I agree with Kenny, if money is tight I'd think about the 2720 with the tires turned out for stability and maybe a 5-6 foot rotary cutter IF your total area to be cut was small enough. If your standards for the lawn are high, you'll need something else close to the house. If they are average, you might be OK with the rotary cutter and a cheap push mower for the areas very close to the house. You're in a tricky situation, sort of on the edge of what to get.

Also keep in mind that big tractors take bigger (and more expensive) attachments. While they get the work done faster, it's at a price. I'd suggest that when you get to the point where you're pricing something, price out the tractor and the attachments you might want (cutter, front end loader "FEL", box blade, landscape rake, snow blade). You can see where you might have a smaller tractor that takes longer but have more attachments so you can tackle more types of jobs. Or if the jobs are known and few in nature, you can get a bigger tractor with less attachments that works quicker. A front snow blade for a 2x20 is very doable, it's harder on a 4x20. And I know you're gonna have snow to deal with. And keep in mind that an extra $600 for a shelter to park your tractor under is really nice. Things don't get beat up and rust as fast if they are kept shielded from the weather. This is just more of this "look at your total cost". And you can spread the purchase out over a number of years, heck for some it's a lifetime adventure!

And if you find something that big, cheap, realiable, has lots of attachments and does the job fast don't keep it a secret :lol:! (and don't send a check in the mail to someone to buy it!)

So let us know just how much area you have to mow, what sort of finish you want, and if the garden/utility tractor solution is doable or not. Also, what are the woods like? Are they old and mature (lots of greater than 12" trees) or young (has been harvested in the last 30 years or so). I can comment on the 4x20 series and when it might be needed, and I know there are lots of 2x20 owners who can guide you as to the ability of that machine.

And I can speak with authority when I say that you _will_ want a front end loader with that much land. And about 2 minutes after your first big storm you will want forks for your tractor.

Well I've rambled enough and need another cup of coffee, I hope this gets you thinking and you can tell us more about your situation so you can tap into all the good owner experiences on this site. And congrats on your little slice of "Almost heaven" up there in WV.

Pete :morning2:
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you all for all the input. I have no idea of what I'm getting myself into. I'm totally new to the game. I have probably around 7 acres total on the three fields up on top. I don't know and can't find on the Deere site what a 2x20 or 2x40 is. I was reading about the 1026 series four wheel drive. I don't want the fields in hay. I want to put is food plots in the future, nothing major. I'm a late comer to the game of hobby farming, but is what I want to do for my retirement. I'm a little afraid of the hilly conditions but is really not that bad if I go up and down instead of side ways. The previous owner had cut lanes around the fields so it no biggie getting up and on the lane and coming down and doing it all over again. I just got the land and I need to look at it better. bought in Junly of this year when it was 104 degrees and then was back there twice more and no time to really appreciate yet what I have. I can cut around the house with a push mower (did it once already). But I think, and do believe I need four wheel drive with a belly cutter and with the 3 point hitch out back and the pto I can add on later. What do you guys suggest. I just can't find what a 2x20 is on the Deere web site.

Tony
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Sorry, as far as the woods, there is no issue there. The two fields were completly denude of trees and all stumps removed, again wiht lanes around the edges. You can then take another lane and hit the other field. The third field is a lot more over grown then the other two and I did encounter a few stumps and tops. Snow is not an issue. My driveway is cement and I do have a blower that is going with me. I was also thinking of attachments for my four wheeler, is a Prairie 360 4x4. But I think a tractor is the way to go.
 

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Pictures would help people on this site fine tune their recommendations to you.
 

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The "x" we are referring to is a number in a series. JD has several models in each series depending on the size and horsepower.So in the 2x20 series you have the 2320,2520, and 2720. In the 3x20 series you have the 3320,3520 and 3720. Same for the 4x20 series.With that much property, I would stay away from the 2x20 series and look at a minimum 3x20 series.
 

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Hey Tony!

OK on all the details. Sorry about the overload there, but now I think there is a better understanding of what you'll be doing. Sorry for the confusion on the tractor models, the 1026 series is broadly similar to the 2x20 series.

So now that the details of you new property are know, it will be easier for folks to chime in with the reasons and recommendations. It also sounds like you can use the push mower around the house to start with, then look for a small riding lawn mower as that gets to be a pain.

Hopefully someone with a 3x20 series tractor can chime in and give their opinion here too. Our land and open area situations are close, and I got a 4520 which is on the higher end in terms of how much dynamite was used to solve a problem.

Pete
 

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Our land and open area situations are close, and I got a 4520 which is on the higher end in terms of how much dynamite was used to solve a problem.

Pete
Quoting the Sundance Kid, "Think you used enough dynamite there Butch?"
 

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Advice and opinions are great, but an important part of your "research" should be getting on a few tractors and actually trying them a bit. That will tell you a lot about what size and model suits you.

Especially if you are not mechanically handy, you want to evaluate dealers in your area. See which ones give you the better impression. If possible, talk with folks who have tractors in your area. Ask not only what they think of their tractors, but what they think of their dealers.
 
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