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Quick & dirty: Slime, Fix-a-Flat, or, if you want to stay "green", JD tire sealant.
A better way (that I'd use): Remove tire, inspect rim, wire brush, prime & paint. Install tube and tire. Bob
 

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I would get a tire shop to fix it proper. Products like slime rot your rims. I've seen the damage it does and it makes a nasty mess to clean up. I hear tire shops really hate it.
 

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Is the rim rusty? Powder coat bubbling? Is there a dent in the rim? Normally tire beads don’t leak unless one of the above issues. Pull the tire off the bead and repair as needed OR a good tire place will fix it if you don’t want to fool with it. May have to tube it as others mentioned.

Ps where do you guys buy your tubes from? Used to have a local place but they closed up. Got some really thick tubes from them. Too bad they closed up as they would vulcanize brass valve stems onto tubes, patch and boot old tires, etc etc, in short a true tire repair shop. I ordered from Gemplers last time. They just sent the same old thin chincy tubes I could have gotten from the local lawn mower place. Miller tire have decent stuff? Might just be the days of quality tire tubes are over?
 

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This is the best repair I've found for low pressure tires like these. I've had several that just refused to hold air. The rear tire on my X495 has been off probably 6-8 times, to the tire shop 3 or 4 of those times. Been patched, soaped, rolled all over the driveway looking for a leak, bead sealed and still it went flat in about 10 days. I put a bottle of liquitube in it and problem solved. Hasn't lost a pound of air in over a year. Was heading down that same path with the front tire on my 2305, after the second time it went flat I got another bottle and problem solved. Found it at my local napa store about as cheap as anywhere.
 

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I'm not a big fan of tubes. They just seem o always be a temporary fix. Many tire shops will just want to put a tube in it. If you broke the bead loose with a tubelss tire, the same thing will happen with a tube tire and damage the tube.

I've been doing my own tire repairs and mounting on my SCUTs and garden tractors. A couple of good tire irons, a ratchet strap, and stem tools are most of what you need. I had a dickens of a time getting the bead to seat on the last new set of 1025R rims and tires I mounted. I finally got it, after fighting it for a couple of hours. There are some products specifically produced for bead seating/sealing available on Amazon and other places. Next time, I'll have some.

If you tackle it yourself, I'd suggest you get some and the necessary tools.
 

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I like the concept in theory but what about when you need to change out worn tires? Gonna make a mess I think. Maybe if your in a tire puncture prone area (construction site, trash pile etc) its worth the eventual headacke for the short term self healing tires.

On the pluss side your tires are probably bullet proof lol.
 

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I'm not a big fan of tubes. They just seem o always be a temporary fix. Many tire shops will just want to put a tube in it. If you broke the bead loose with a tubelss tire, the same thing will happen with a tube tire and damage the tube.

I've been doing my own tire repairs and mounting on my SCUTs and garden tractors. A couple of good tire irons, a ratchet strap, and stem tools are most of what you need. I had a dickens of a time getting the bead to seat on the last new set of 1025R rims and tires I mounted. I finally got it, after fighting it for a couple of hours. There are some products specifically produced for bead seating/sealing available on Amazon and other places. Next time, I'll have some.

If you tackle it yourself, I'd suggest you get some and the necessary tools.
I've fought tires and now most of the time, I let a tire shop do it. Personally for a slow leak, it's Liquitube. The stuff really works.

Tire shops have "donuts", blast air and bead goop/sealant none of which do I have. I do have Liquitube. While other sealants leave a mess and can rust the rims, Liquitube can be washed out/off of a rim and has rust inhibitors in it to protect the time. Ten minutes putting the correct amount in the tire, pumping it back up and running it around and you would probably be good to go. That seems like a better use of my time as opposed to fighting a tire for a couple of hours.

Treefarmer
 

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Well you sold me if it washes out easy. I will have to give it a try next time I have a slow leak.

Also to the guys having trouble seating a bead that blue tank in this video is an air tank with a ball valve. You dump the air quickly all at once right next to the tire bead and it seats the tire most of the time. Ether/starting fluid is plan B as these guys demonstrate. You all can decide for yourselves how comfortable you are with doing that.

 

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I like the concept in theory but what about when you need to change out worn tires? Gonna make a mess I think. Maybe if your in a tire puncture prone area (construction site, trash pile etc) its worth the eventual headacke for the short term self healing tires.

On the pluss side your tires are probably bullet proof lol.
Near the end of the video it shows that you can just easily wash it away with a hose.
 

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I have a utility trailer that I built years ago for use on my property that I pull with my 2520.
It has 235 / 75 R 15 tires on it. I looked into getting them foam filled!
Holy cow, 150 bucks a tire!!:( Oh well.
 

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I would not use liquid tire sealants.
There is one or two that seem highly recommended, but Slime for one will rot your wheels. Its fine short term, but if you leave it in a tire, it will eventually rust the wheel bad enough that you will either need a new wheel, or a tube to seal it.
Ive run into this a few times on equipment Ive bought. Generally I find out about it when Ive had a tire problem, and go to fix it.
The latest was the front tires on my Exmark. Bought it from a buddy, and while he didnt really like Slime, he did use it from time to time. Apparently he used it in both front tires.
5 years in (best I can figure from what he said), and the wheels are so rough, no amount of cleaning and painting will allow them to seal.

Now, a bead sealing compound would work, but since I do my own tires, and didnt have any handy, I just put tubes in them.
On the larger tires, Id bead seal it and call it a day, if thats really whats leaking.
 

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You can get Bead sealer in a can from Napa.

IIRC it was about 20 bux.....Looks like abs pipe glue...cap has the brush attatched to it.

Your unit is new enough...probly got dirt or a stick between tire and wheel/rim.
I'm guessing No rust/rot. If you can break bead..clean..seal if needed and air it up.

Use a ratchet strap if needed around tire to seat bead.

I've got 2 tire machines and still need to resort to the strap or similar device on smallish tires.
 

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Probably all you need to do is break the bead and clean the matting surfaces. Being the its a tractor there’s a good chance dirt got pushed in between the tire and rim.
 

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I went through this with the turfs on the 4010, even had one side come completely off the rim twice. Used Slime. Helped for a while. Then put tubes in. Finally replaced. The replacement turfs seems tougher.
 
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