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My friend and I both bought 4052R's recently, and he bought a grapple from these guys. Since we cut wood together, I figured I'd plumb my tractor to be able to use his grapple until I decide if I can afford one. I helped him install the JD third function line kit on his loader arms, and I was unimpressed. It was ~$430, there were no instructions, the fasteners didn't work in the holes in the loader, the quick connects seem to be in a poor spot. His grapple also came with skid steer flat face couplers, so he had to adapt to that from the JD connections. I figured I could cobble something together that would save money and work just as well.

I started off contacting the always helpful Kenny from Ken's bolt on hooks fame, and we had some discussion and he offered me some direction. He didn't have a turn key kit, and the 440R and H180 loader it replaced are built a little different than the smaller ones he had kits for. So while he has all my measurements and may offer a kit later, we decided I'd prototype it and share my results here. For him I measured line length both to the factory loader connection if you had a 3rd function, and back to the rear connections if you wanted to run something off the 4th and 5th SCV's in the rear of the 4 series. I have the factory 3rd function so that's what these pictures show.

Ken guided me to 1/4" 2 wire hose, since it would be flexible enough for good routing and flow enough for a grapple in the confined space I had to work with. I wanted to run 1/2" flat face couplers, and those are unavailable in a 1/4" fitting of any kind that I could source. So I have adapters at each ends of my hoses. A more knowledgeable guy at the hydraulics shop might have made that avoidable, but I got what I got locally. This worked out fine, I used the 1/4" NPT to 1/2" NPT to make a poor man's bulkhead fitting to hold the couplers and secure the lines at the loader end. I made this pretty easily with some angle aluminum and a step bit. The fittings thread snugly into the aluminum, but that's really all I did for retention and they are solid. I used the factory acorn nut on the cross bar to secure that bracket. It looks tight in this (dark) photo, but I have clearance to hook and unhook.


The smaller loaders run their hard lines right done the side of the loader arm, giving you an easy place to zip tie soft lines. The 440R runs their lines in an exposed "C" under the loader arm. I could have tried to zip tie under there, but the "S" twist I'd have to put in the lines would constantly be trying to twist the connections or I'd hav to add more fittings. I had some dual hose clamps, and they have a 5/16th bolt running through the center. I used a drill tap to drill and thread one of the holes in the arm that is used by the factory line set after I verified it was all clear behind that. If you haven't used a drill tap before, they are great but need a little respect so they don't snap. I lubed this up and it went easy. As we always hope it does.




I took the clamp apart and discarded the bolt for a longer one, and dtiched the steel backing plate since I was using the now threaded loader arm as my "nut".



I ran the lines through some 1.5" expandable nylon protective sleeving and then into the factory version of that. I re-did all the zip ties in the same way the factory did. I did get two of the giant zip ties from my dealer since the ones on my loader would no longer fit around the 2 extra lines in the bundle. I ran the dual hose clamp bolt through the sleeving, sorry that picture is blurry.





Here's the big zip tie and one of the two locations on the loader you need to use them.



Here's the finished product on my 440r MSL, and a kind of crappy shot of my buddies non-MSL with the factory lines for comparison.




His photo wasn't taken with showing the lines in mind, but you can see how the routing is similar. Overall this was a pretty easy project, sourcing the parts is the hardest part when you're prototyping. Especially with hydraulics, you have to know your NPT from your JIC and your ORF. If you don't you might order a bunch of stuff and end up SOL when it doesn't fit together. :) I made several trips to different places to run this stuff down and be able to screw thing together before I walked out of the store. Either plan on a lot of legwork or seek professional help like I did from Ken. Overall I saved well over $150 dollars from doing it the JD way. That's almost as satisfying as hooking up a horn I had to the factory harness and buying a $7 button and saving $83.

Now I just need to buy my own grapple...
 

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Nice clean work :good2:
 

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Great job PU :good2:
 

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I don't like NPT fitting for hydraulics, but I do like your "poor man's" bulk head fittings you made. :bigthumb:
 

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I don't like NPT fitting for hydraulics, but I do like your "poor man's" bulk head fittings you made. :bigthumb:
That choice was defined by the novice behind the counter at my hydraulic shop. He told me the only way I could get from 1/2 to 1/4 would be an NPT fitting. I think that was because he had NPT flat face couplers in his hand. I actually had to go to another place to get the fittings in that "bulkhead", he didn't have them. I should have cut him off and just went to a different shop, be he had 99% of what I needed.

The best part is that when he made the hose, he made the other end go from 1/4 JIC to ORF without even asking me. So I have all the fitting types covered :laugh:

I use a good product from Lawson called Tefseal, and it works really well so I don't expect any leaks, but I'll watch it.
 
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