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Discussion Starter #1
I am hooking up a spray booth in my shop and looking for a little electrical help in making sure all gets hooked up properly.

Quick background, I have good knowledge of home wiring and no trouble doing any of that. I have never hooked up a magnetic switch and just want to be sure. The wiring in the motor is also "not standard"

Motor is a 1.5 HP 230v single phase.

What size breaker do I use when comparing fla to the running amps used?

ImageUploadedByTapatalk1353427766.645365.jpg

The motor has 6 wires in the junction box. T1,t2,t3,t4,t5,t8
When opened 4,5 where twisted together. 1 by itself, 2,3,8 twisted together. (Use to seeing red and black)
What goes to what in hooking up the wire?



Finally the switch. Do I hook up red to t2 black to t2?


Upload from tap talk and not sure if the pictures are working.

Thanks for any help you guys can provide.
 

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I can see a wiring schematic inside the peckerhead in the second picture. It should have the legend for which numbered wire to join for different voltages.
Always base your wire size and breaker for FLA (full load amps) and breaker size should be 20% above FLA. Also,it really doesnt matter on 220 single phase what the color code is....but I usually hook black to T1 and red to T2...just out of habit
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I can see a wiring schematic inside the peckerhead in the second picture. It should have the legend for which numbered wire to join for different voltages.
Always base your wire size and breaker for FLA (full load amps) and breaker size should be 20% above FLA. Also,it really doesnt matter on 220 single phase what the color code is....but I usually hook black to T1 and red to T2...just out of habit
Great info thanks. The label inside was useless but I did recheck and see it now on the main label. That is buried against the wall.
ImageUploadedByTapatalk1353430614.335660.jpg


Now I have to ask, is it called a peckerhead or is that a cell phone typo?

Thanks agian.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Always base your wire size and breaker for FLA (full load amps) and breaker size should be 20% above FLA.
So in this case at 220v fla rating of 8.7 x 20% is 10.4. So a 15 amp breaker?

Feed wires go to t1 and 2. Where does the load attach in this switch. I assume L1 and 2?




Thanks
 

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... Now I have to ask, is it called a peckerhead or is that a cell phone typo?
I had to google that too, they have some funny definitions, :lol:

But the one used here is: Pecker, or more fully, "pecker head", is a slang term for an electric motor terminal connection box.
Just my 2 cents and thanks for my laugh of the day.
 

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Oh my...:mocking:
 

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You have to admit; rgd has a way with words.:laugh:
 

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So in this case at 220v fla rating of 8.7 x 20% is 10.4. So a 15 amp breaker?

Feed wires go to t1 and 2. Where does the load attach in this switch. I assume L1 and 2?




Thanks
That will be close, RGD is very close, but just a bit off on a couple of points. I have to go out to the barn and do chores, when I come back in I will go down the list , and clear it all up for you.:good2: As a practical matter, with this small of a motor, the end result will be the same, but I want to make sure that you understand how to get there according to the NEC.
 

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That is an industry standard term. But I think Randy smiles really big every time he says it. :mocking:
 

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It looks like we have a single phase, 230V, 1.5 HP, service factor 1.0 motor.
Also, from the picture, you have a 3 phase contactor and overload relay.

So, we have to size the wire, breaker, and overload protection. We can worry about hooking it up later.

First of all, there is allot of misconceptions on how to do this. Article 430 of the NEC deals with motors. It is the biggest code article in the NEC, and it can be confusing. Some of what RGD is saying would apply to motors less than 1 hp without overload relays.
One thing to remember is that the ONLY thing you use the nameplate full load amps for is sizing / setting the overload protection (that thing below your contactor) (article 430.6 (A)(2)).
EVERYTHING else comes from a chart in the NEC based on your motor horsepower.
Please beat that point into your head (article 430.6 (A)(1)).

Your nameplate FLA is”8.6”, so set the knob on your overload relay to “8.6”. From the picture, yours goes down to “9”. It should turn down a little lower than “9”.
This gizmo is what actually protects your motor.
Now forget about the nameplate FLA; we are done with it.

Now we go to table 430.248 and find out what the NEC says a 1.5 hp, 230V, single phase motor has for a FLA. Turns out it is 10 amps; substantially more than the motor nameplate.
We should size the conductors now. The NEC says to size the wire at 125% of the NEC FLA(430.22). In our case that is 12.5 amps. Well within the ampacity of 14 AWG, but I would use 12 AWG. If you don’t want to, that’s OK.

Now we should size the breaker. The NEC refers to this as “motor short circuit protection” since the overload relay actually protects the motor. The breaker is only there to provide quick protection from short circuits. We go to NEC 430.52 for this.
The NEC actually allows you to go up to 250% of the NEC FLA for an “inverse time breaker”. This is where it is helpful to know what the motor is doing. You don’t want nuisance tripping when the motor starts. Without knowing more, I would just go with 175-200% and slap a 20 amp breaker on it. Just remember what the breaker is for. If you put a 30 amp breaker on there, it would still trip if there was a dead short.
So, I would go with 12 awg wire on a 20 amp breaker.

As far as wiring the motor, Tie “T2,T3and T8” together with a wire nut, Tie “T4,T5 and your red “hot” together, Tie your black “hot” together with T1.
Give all the conductors a good “pull test” in the wire nuts, then tape the wire nuts good too. Don’t forget the ground.

You were asking about wiring the contactor. How is it controlled? A selector switch, a two button “start/stop” station? Let me know. Also, what is the coil voltage for your contactor? It should say right on the top of the contactor. All that stuff matters.

Finally, it looks like it is a 3 phase contactor and overload relay. Some of the better overloads have phase loss protection built in. That causes problems when you use them in single phase applications because it sees that as a phase loss. Fortunately, it can be wired in such a way as to “fool” it. Once I know how you are planning to control it, I can walk you through that also.:thumbup1gif::thumbup1gif: Since you have a magnetic starter, I would recommend a two button electrically latching setup. So you would need a normally open momentary start button, and a normally closed momentary stop button. I can hand draw you a complete schematic, scan it, and post it if you are interested.

It will be fun
 

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Discussion Starter #12
You were asking about wiring the contactor. How is it controlled? A selector switch, a two button “start/stop” station? Let me know. Also, what is the coil voltage for your contactor? It should say right on the top of the contactor. All that stuff matters.

Finally, it looks like it is a 3 phase contactor and overload relay. Some of the better overloads have phase loss protection built in. That causes problems when you use them in single phase applications because it sees that as a phase loss. Fortunately, it can be wired in such a way as to “fool” it. Once I know how you are planning to control it, I can walk you through that also.:thumbup1gif::thumbup1gif: Since you have a magnetic starter, I would recommend a two button electrically latching setup. So you would need a normally open momentary start button, and a normally closed momentary stop button. I can hand draw you a complete schematic, scan it, and post it if you are interested.

It will be fun
With the help so far. I have the motor wired. 12 awg wire (was pre run)
did pick up this evening a 2 pole 15 amp breaker. Will that work or should we go with the 20?

The switch is a two button start stop. It is being used to run a spray booth exhaust fan. So no real load variations once its up to speed.

The switch was bought with the motor so it seems like it is set up to work with single phase power. (But I am not the expert).
As for coil voltage all i see on top is
230v 60hz
220v 50hz


Here are some pics I can provided. Also found the wiring that came with the unit. And with the help so far it is starting to make a lot more sense.

ImageUploadedByTapatalk1353465367.876901.jpg
Side view of switch.

ImageUploadedByTapatalk1353465420.686419.jpg
Wiring diagram. Seems most of the l3 and t3 wiring is pre done.

ImageUploadedByTapatalk1353465498.852942.jpg
Nameplate on side of switch.

Help is greatly appreciated. I can provide any more info or pictures that are needed.
 

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The 15 amp breaker will be OK. If you have nuisance tripping, then go to a 20.:thumbup1gif:
From the schematic you can see how they wired the contactor to "fool" the overload into thinking it has all 3 phases, so you are good to go there:thumbup1gif:
Just wire the 2 hots from the breaker into the top of the contactor at L1 and L3. Wire the motor to the bottom of overload relay at T1 and T2, just like your schematic shows:thumbup1gif:
Are the buttons wired up also? Do you have a schematic for those?
I watched your video, that's how the contactor works, you apply 230 volts to the coil, and it will "suck in". All 4 poles will "make".
 

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Discussion Starter #15
The 15 amp breaker will be OK. If you have nuisance tripping, then go to a 20.:thumbup1gif:
From the schematic you can see how they wired the contactor to "fool" the overload into thinking it has all 3 phases, so you are good to go there:thumbup1gif:
Just wire the 2 hots from the breaker into the top of the contactor at L1 and L3. Wire the motor to the bottom of overload relay at T1 and T2, just like your schematic shows:thumbup1gif:
Are the buttons wired up also? Do you have a schematic for those?
I watched your video, that's how the contactor works, you apply 230 volts to the coil, and it will "suck in". All 4 poles will "make".
Really appreciate the time and effort you have taken to respond to my questions.

The buttons are pre-wired and ready to go. Don't see any schematics for it either.

Will report back when it's up and running

Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Got everything up and running. But 1 problem. The motor is spinning the wrong way. My exhaust fan "blows". Not very useful.

I found some info online, that suggest swapping wires 5 and 8. I tried this for a few seconds and it worked. My question is, is this an acceptable solution or do I risk motor damage?

Agian this unit with fan and motor was pre assembled and made for this application. Just spun the wrong way.

Thanks
 

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Got everything up and running. But 1 problem. The motor is spinning the wrong way. My exhaust fan "blows". Not very useful.

I found some info online, that suggest swapping wires 5 and 8. I tried this for a few seconds and it worked. My question is, is this an acceptable solution or do I risk motor damage?

Agian this unit with fan and motor was pre assembled and made for this application. Just spun the wrong way.

Thanks
Yes, that is how you do it. I can see from one of your pictures that it says that on your motor nameplate as well.
You should check the motor with an amp meter also, to make sure it is drawing the proper current.
Looks like you're home free now . Good Job :thumbup1gif:
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Yes, that is how you do it. I can see from one of your pictures that it says that on your motor nameplate as well.
You should check the motor with an amp meter also, to make sure it is drawing the proper current.
Looks like you're home free now . Good Job :thumbup1gif:
Amazing how i can now see it on the name plate when someone points out what to look for. Haha. I looked for a picture and forgot to read. Does not help the name plate is up against the wall and have to stand on my head to read it.

Thanks.
 
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