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Ten years ago during snowmagedden in PA I had a tree land on my hood breaking the front corner. At the time the replacement piece was $700 then a few years later you could only buy the whole hood assembly and the price jumped to $1300. After years of procrastination I finally decided to fix the hole. After some research on the hood material called Envirez and some trials I discovered epoxy resin didn't adhere very well to the green gel coat. I ended up stitching all the broken pieces together with small plastic plates and screws. On the back side of the hood I ground off all the gel coat and started with a reinforcement layer of kevlar cloth then a cover layer of carbon fibre cloth using West Marine epoxy as a resin binder. Once dried I removed the clips and filled in the joints with JB Weld, urethane Plastic Bonder and sanded smooth. I also used the JB weld to repair the head light trim ring and reattach some broken screw mounts. It also gave me the opportunity to straighten out the grill where tree branches did some damage.
Except for the new shiny paint the end result turned out really well. We will see how it holds up over time but I'm pretty happy with the results so far. The West Marine epoxy is over $100 a gallon but an excellent product. I already had the epoxy and cloth from other projects so it ended up as a pretty inexpensive fix.
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Looks like a great repair job.(y)
 

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That's an awesome repair, hope the epoxy stays bound to the plastic. I tried a similar repair many years ago to a GT235 hoof that had split. I used a fine fiberglass cloth and applied several layers of cloth to a very abraded under surface (to help it bond), but after a year, the epoxy debonded from the plastic.

Recently, I repaired a split side panel on my 2520 and instead of epoxy, used a cyanoacrylate cement (super glue) and laminated a polyester fabric made for aircraft wing covering to the underside of the panel. It's holding very well in an area that gets a fair amount of vibration.

It's all worth trying, at least to delay having to lay out megabucks for these plastic parts. I'm glad the top of my hood is steel.
 

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That is an awesome job. Thanks for sharing how you accomplished.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
That's an awesome repair, hope the epoxy stays bound to the plastic. I tried a similar repair many years ago to a GT235 hoof that had split. I used a fine fiberglass cloth and applied several layers of cloth to a very abraded under surface (to help it bond), but after a year, the epoxy debonded from the plastic.

Recently, I repaired a split side panel on my 2520 and instead of epoxy, used a cyanoacrylate cement (super glue) and laminated a polyester fabric made for aircraft wing covering to the underside of the panel. It's holding very well in an area that gets a fair amount of vibration.

It's all worth trying, at least to delay having to lay out megabucks for these plastic parts. I'm glad the top of my hood is steel.
I also repaired the hood on a GT242 a few years ago using epoxy and carbon fiber and it worked well. I sold the tractor not long after so I don’t know how it held up long term. On most of the Deere L&G tractors they use a thermoplastic material which has is a little more rigid and brittle. I’m surprised some of the abuse the plastic parts on my 3320 have experienced without breaking or cracking. It’s actually some pretty tough stuff.
 

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I also repaired the hood on a GT242 a few years ago using epoxy and carbon fiber and it worked well. I sold the tractor not long after so I don’t know how it held up long term. On most of the Deere L&G tractors they use a thermoplastic material which has is a little more rigid and brittle. I’m surprised some of the abuse the plastic parts on my 3320 have experienced without breaking or cracking. It’s actually some pretty tough stuff.
I think over the years, Deere and others have changed the 'plastic' they use, trying to find something tough enough to take abuse and not so brittle or temperature-sensitive. The material in my GT235's hood was called "Zenoy", I suppose some proprietary brand name. It eventually succumbed to being flexed when cold. It may have been a different formulation on my X748's hood, as I've dropped things on it and bumped it with tree limbs in very cold (freezing) weather, and the worst it got was a scratch that pretty much buffed out. I'm not sure what caused the crack in my 2520's side cover, as it was there when I bought the machine. I hurried to repair it, because it was a crack that would have continued to run, eventually breaking the side panel into two pieces. No telling how long it had been there, though.
 
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