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Building out a 42' x 24' storage barn & work area. Floor is concrete. Construction is post & beam. For added structural stability I'm installing 7/16" OSB over the girts, then I will be covering the OSB with most likely 3/8" T 1-11. Between the sheathing material I will have a 1/4" air gap for draining out any potential accumulated water condensation or vapor. I'm wondering if I should also install a house wrap over the OSB, then my 1/4' air gap & finally the finished T1-11.

I'm asking because I really do not see a need for house wrap on an unheated building. As far as climate goes, I'm down here in South Crapolina where the summers are brutal from humidity, but the nice thing is I can run around all winter in shorts & a sweatshirt. Would welcome your opinions & experiences with this issue. Thanks!
 

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If you are installing the air gap with the expectations that water will run down the side of the OSB, IMHO your osb will be rotted out in 10 yrs?
I would install the wrap , and I would consider using the hardi board sheathing instead of the plywood- last I looked it was about 5$ a sheet more. We live 12 miles from the SC border. We have board and batten siding. All wood. House is 15 yrs old. Lots of rot on the plywood siding and most of the battens are history. My B.I.L is a builder in Wilmington, NC and they are using hardiboard now. even for the battens. The sun is so intense, and humidity, the boards expand and contract and the caulk at each batten fails in about three yrs...the wrap will save your OSB.
 

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Instead of traditional house wrap, look into fluid applied products that can be rolled or sprayed on. I have no idea what the cost difference is though.

Matt Risinger's YouBoob channel has some recent videos on fluid applied barriers. One brand is blue and was developed by a Florida based builder and chemist, which is a unique combination of professions.
 

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I would go with a metal building. You can get them in all shape and size's and price range.
metal-garages-alabama-steel-garages-al-metal-buildings-alabama.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #6
If you are installing the air gap with the expectations that water will run down the side of the OSB, IMHO your osb will be rotted out in 10 yrs?
I would install the wrap , and I would consider using the hardi board sheathing instead of the plywood- last I looked it was about 5$ a sheet more. We live 12 miles from the SC border. We have board and batten siding. All wood. House is 15 yrs old. Lots of rot on the plywood siding and most of the battens are history. My B.I.L is a builder in Wilmington, NC and they are using hardiboard now. even for the battens. The sun is so intense, and humidity, the boards expand and contract and the caulk at each batten fails in about three yrs...the wrap will save your OSB.
I am not expecting to have issues where water condensate or vapor will be so extreme that I will have water running down the OSB. But I guess that could happen. I was thinking about residual moisture between walls & it's affect on warping T1-11 & on what water vapor might do to degrade the exterior finish like applied solid stain. For the small added cost, it probably would be better to just put up the house wrap as an added layer of protection.

Hardiboard & Hardiplank- There is also another product like it called NICHI Products. Made in Norcross, Ga. Enterprise Web Application Development, Mobile Apps Services, Cloud Based Apps

I think its better quality than overpriced Hardiboard. I'm considering NICHI clapboard on the front of my Barn & T1-11 on the remaining three sides. This barn is about 75 feet from my house, so I'm trying to maintain a degree of visual appearance between the barn & the house. My neighbor has a steel barn behind his house. It's a complete eyesore & I don't want to see that eyesore on my property. Thanks for your opinion. I think I will put up the house wrap. It's not a big deal to do.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I would go with a metal building. You can get them in all shape and size's and price range.
View attachment 383386
Thanks- I have considered a metal building. I've also considered the cost & construction time. Construction time is a winner. Cost not so. If I try to have one fabricated to match my needs it's a huge cost. The barn is within 100 feet of my house & unless I do a custom fab job, they would make my house a complete eyesore with no curb appeal. Metal buildings are nice, but I don't want something that looks like a tin garage or a livestock pen. I am out in the country here with farms all around, & some of these structures are strictly commercial looking. I'm retired & a homeowner who just needs some extra shop & storage space. Thanks for your suggestion.
 

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I'm wondering if I should also install a house wrap over the OSB, then my 1/4' air gap & finally the finished T1-11.
In my experience you will have more trouble with the house wrap in place than you will without. As breathable as they claim it to be I have seen more rot and mold with it in place than without.
I would also nudge you away from T-111. You have to paint/stain it all the time and it still rots along the bottom.... at least in MI.

Mike
 

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In my experience you will have more trouble with the house wrap in place than you will without. As breathable as they claim it to be I have seen more rot and mold with it in place than without.
I would also nudge you away from T-111. You have to paint/stain it all the time and it still rots along the bottom.... at least in MI.

Mike
Yes, T1-11 can rot & warp. The last Barn I built in NY was finished in 5/8" T1-11 Southern Yellow Pine. It too 25 years of rain snow & ice to cause one panel to warp away from the girt frame at the ground level. And I stained it only two times in 25 years.

There are a lot of materials out there classified as T1-11 but they are made from OSB, or Fiberboard and ARE not rated in many cases as structural material by code. T 1-11 is just a finish or specific look. I've seen a lot of rotted out T1-11 but the panel was not true Southern Yellow Pine. Just my experience with the material. Proper installation, correct class of material for the application & you should have no major issues for years of ownership.
 
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