Green Tractor Talk banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,587 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
How's does the hour meter on the 1025 work/calculate?

It don't seem to be on actual real time.

I bought LGB with 1.1 hour. I'm now at 9 hours with just under a 1/4 tank of deisel. I wonder how much time I've actually spent on it.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,540 Posts
It's actual time. I've double checked the hour meter, and time on my cell phone while cutting grass. It's pretty much minute for minute.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,587 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
It's actual time. I've double checked the hour meter, and time on my cell phone while cutting grass. It's pretty much minute for minute.

Hmmm. I'll have to try it tomorrow. In about 30 minutes real time I think I went from 8.3-8.8 hours. It was in park at around 2200 rpm while I was on the zero turn. Zero turn kept getting stuck and I had to keep pulling it out of the mud lol
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,964 Posts
Hmmm. I'll have to try it tomorrow. In about 30 minutes real time I think I went from 8.3-8.8 hours. It was in park at around 2200 rpm while I was on the zero turn. Zero turn kept getting stuck and I had to keep pulling it out of the mud lol
Are you not realizing that the decimal part is tenths of an hour and not minutes. The difference between 8.3 and 8.8 is 5/10 of an hour or 30 minutes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
124 Posts
.

I bought LGB with 1.1 hour. I'm now at 9 hours with just under a 1/4 tank of deisel. I wonder how much time I've actually spent on it.
Hmm 8.9 hours ?



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,448 Posts
Mechanical vs. electronic

The old mechanical hour members were slaved to the engine and usually calibrated so the hours were at a particular engine speed such as PTO speed. On those if it was a PTO speed calibration, one hour on the meter could be more or less than 1 hour elapsed time depending on how fast you were running the engine.

The electronic ones could be either way. You might have to check your book to see how your model is set up. Some of them are just a simple clock tied to the key switch so if the switch is on, the hour meter is running even if the engine isn't turning.

Treefarmer
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,103 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
124 Posts
The old mechanical hour members were slaved to the engine and usually calibrated so the hours were at a particular engine speed such as PTO speed. On those if it was a PTO speed calibration, one hour on the meter could be more or less than 1 hour elapsed time depending on how fast you were running the engine.

The electronic ones could be either way. You might have to check your book to see how your model is set up. Some of them are just a simple clock tied to the key switch so if the switch is on, the hour meter is running even if the engine isn't turning.

Treefarmer
Yes indeed they are just a clock tied to the key switch , treefarmer that was the first form of a tachometer a mechanical hour meter dates way back

In the we will say 60s you would have to run the machine at true pto Rpm for true real time recording , im not sure when electric hour meters became common I know there was huge tampering issues related to it that's why they started incorporating hourmeters into other gauges like tachs. Now it's just a clock - if I remember right there are 6 minutes in a 1/10th and every 6 minutes is your .1 on the meter thus 10/10=60min


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,587 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
It's actual time. I've double checked the hour meter, and time on my cell phone while cutting grass. It's pretty much minute for minute.
Are you not realizing that the decimal part is tenths of an hour and not minutes. The difference between 8.3 and 8.8 is 5/10 of an hour or 30 minutes.
Hmm 8.9 hours ?



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
The old mechanical hour members were slaved to the engine and usually calibrated so the hours were at a particular engine speed such as PTO speed. On those if it was a PTO speed calibration, one hour on the meter could be more or less than 1 hour elapsed time depending on how fast you were running the engine.

The electronic ones could be either way. You might have to check your book to see how your model is set up. Some of them are just a simple clock tied to the key switch so if the switch is on, the hour meter is running even if the engine isn't turning.

Treefarmer
I had to use my fingers and toes to figure this out, but my cipherin' says it's 7.9 hours. :thumbup1gif:

-Yep. I believe you are right

-ha. I'm an idiot. I'm not sure what I was thinking. I think I was thinking minutes but that would then be 100 minutes. :banghead: brain fart lol. Why would tractors make us think like that though? Lol

-hmmm 7.9 lol. I guess that question was more of it wasn't actual rue time and it was more rpm/time combination :)

-how am I suppose to read and learn cool stuff on here if I'm reading a manual! Lol. But I did find in the manual "hour meter shows total number of accumulated running hours. Use the hour meter as a guide when servicing various components of thi machine". I'm going to say actual hours :)

-just anylyzed this post. I hope you are ok and haven't lost any fingers or toes. If you own all fingers and toes insert a lol & a :lol:after toes. If you are missing a few then I apologize then do not insert those
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,899 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,103 Posts
Well unless you are in Canada where it might be a metric hour with 100 minutes, :lol:

Is that a real thing??? :unknown:











Just kidding! I'm not blonde! :laugh: Of course you never know what those folks up North will come up with during their long winters. After all, they do have Imperial Gallons up there, eh?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,899 Posts
Is that a real thing??? :unknown:

Just kidding! I'm not blonde! :laugh: Of course you never know what those folks up North will come up with during their long winters. After all, they do have Imperial Gallons up there, eh?
I suppose I could try to get some milage out of the 100 minute hour idea ... but you guys are too sharp for that.

Oh, with the gallon... the imperial was the original size gallon that equated to 10 pounds of water. Somebody has sold you guys short about 17% on your gallons... :lol:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
When I worked in retail we didn't have "hundred minute hours" but we did calculate payroll by hours and hundredths of hours on the time clock. It made the math much easier to calculate by hand.

If you clocked in for an 8:00 shift just a tick early it was not 7:59, but 7:99. You got used to seeing 2.33 hours or 6.90 hours instead of 2 hours 20 mins or 6 hours 54 mins.

Obviously the tenths of hours on the John Deere refer to six minute intervals, 6, 12, 18, 24, 30, etc.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top