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Discussion Starter #1
The first item on my bucket list is to start construction of a new pole storage barn & work shed. I have a set of plans for it. The immediate problem is that I have no help beyond myself & my 855 utility tractor. The only construction problem I see is the lifting & setting of sixteen poles that will be 6"X6" x 16' & 14' long respectively. I see no other problems in carrying out any other part of the construction as a one man construction crew.

I do not have a FEL on my tractor or any type of implements that will allow me to lift & upright a pole to get it into position. My post depth in the ground will be between three & four feet deep. What I am thinking about is the use of a 3pt. boom pole on the 3pt hitch. To the boom pole I could construct a vertical post with a arm on top, properly braced so that I can attach my chain hoist to the arm & then use the chain hoist to raise the pole & maneuver it into position. The vertical post that I attached to the boom pole will rest on the ground with a "foot" attached to the bottom of the post. So essentially, all the weight of the 6" x 6" post in a vertical position when lifted would be transferred to the post attached to the boom pole, and transferred to the ground.

I really don't know if I'm describing this clear enough for anyone to understand. I know one picture is better than a thousand words, but, don't have the picture or a sketch I could scan in, hence the thousand words. But if you can visualize a boom pole, and attached to that a vertical post with an arm on top, or something that looks like a No. 7 about 16 foot tall, you got the picture. Thanks.
:think:
 

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I think I get what your are describing but I'm not sure you'd get enough height out of a boom lift on the 3pt hitch. You'd probably have to use at least 12' long 6x6's for your posts and you're only going to get 6-8' height out of the boom lift. That's not to say that it can't be done, but I'd think it'd be pretty dangerous to be doing by yourself.

I'd rig up something using some 12' steel pipe first. 3 or 4 of them linked together at the top with the legs spread out. Then you could attach your hoist to the top of that and lift the posts up and drop them into the holes. Something like this.
 

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I think your concern may not be a concern at all. Just one person may be a little tough but with two people it would be easy enough.
You will more than likely need two people to level and plumb the poles. My wife and I set the post for our pole barn waaaay back when and they were 14' x 6" x 6"

Our garage being built in 2011...
Post number 5, two guys set the post. Notice the pipe clamp the guy is using.
http://www.greentractortalk.com/forums/barns-buildings/1874-my-20-x-32-kistler-building.html
 

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When we built our pole shed, two people were able to walk the 6"x6"x16' poles up and drop them into the holes.
Were you one of them? I just need to know.:munch:
 

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Yes, yes I was. :)

The poles and someone handing me metal sheets when I was putting the roof on were the only parts of the job where I had help. :laugh:
The trusses got me, needed a third person for that.
 

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I built my previous house by myself - the only power tool I used was a circular saw running from a generator. This is always a way to do this stuff.

Think rope and pulleys.

I'll see if I can explain what I have in my mind......

After your holes are dug for the upright poles - plant one other temporary pole maybe 8' or 10' in height adjacent to the poles you want to set. On top of this temporary pole attach a pulley.

Now with your permanent pole base at the hole in the ground elevate the pole on a saw horse or something enough for the bottom of the pole to catch into the hold in the ground hole. Then attach a piece of rope to the top of that pole so it will stay put and not slide. Then the rope goes back to the pulley on top of your temporary pole, then to your tractor draw bar or hitch. Then you can slowly move the tractor forward and it will lift the top of the pole as you go. The first movement you will have to be sure the bottom of the pole is going to go into the hole and not slide beyond it. Once you are sure the bottom of the pole will go in the hole as you lift - just slowly keep pulling. You might have to stop here and there to nudge the bottom of the pole some with a bar or something to make sure it goes where you want. Once the pole base is in the hole and almost all the way upright, then build a temporary brace to hold it as you get it perfectly vertical. Once the poll is almost verticle you can move it some by hand into a brace you already made. One hand holding the pole where you want it and the other hand with a hammer ready to drive the pre-started nails in your brace.

Don't know if I am explaining my method well or not. I did similar things for roof rafters, trusses, and roof sheathing - but I didn't have a tractor back then - all pulling on a rope by hand with the use of pulleys.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
The first item on my bucket list is to start construction of a new pole storage barn & work shed. I have a set of plans for it. The immediate problem is that I have no help beyond myself & my 855 utility tractor. The only construction problem I see is the lifting & setting of sixteen poles that will be 6"X6" x 16' & 14' long respectively. I see no other problems in carrying out any other part of the construction as a one man construction crew.

I do not have a FEL on my tractor or any type of implements that will allow me to lift & upright a pole to get it into position. My post depth in the ground will be between three & four feet deep. What I am thinking about is the use of a 3pt. boom pole on the 3pt hitch. To the boom pole I could construct a vertical post with a arm on top, properly braced so that I can attach my chain hoist to the arm & then use the chain hoist to raise the pole & maneuver it into position. The vertical post that I attached to the boom pole will rest on the ground with a "foot" attached to the bottom of the post. So essentially, all the weight of the 6" x 6" post in a vertical position when lifted would be transferred to the post attached to the boom pole, and transferred to the ground.

I really don't know if I'm describing this clear enough for anyone to understand. I know one picture is better than a thousand words, but, don't have the picture or a sketch I could scan in, hence the thousand words. But if you can visualize a boom pole, and attached to that a vertical post with an arm on top, or something that looks like a No. 7 about 16 foot tall, you got the picture. Thanks.
:think:
I think you have the idea I'm working on, but one point I want to clear up. The 3pt. boom itself would be parked in a horizontal (more or less) position. The lifting post or the vertical post of the "7" would be attached or bolted to the front end of the boom pole. Think of a No.7 and somewhere near the bottom of the seven the boom pole is at a right angle to the leg of the seven. Thanks for you help.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I built my previous house by myself - the only power tool I used was a circular saw running from a generator. This is always a way to do this stuff.

Think rope and pulleys.

I'll see if I can explain what I have in my mind......

After your holes are dug for the upright poles - plant one other temporary pole maybe 8' or 10' in height adjacent to the poles you want to set. On top of this temporary pole attach a pulley.

Now with your permanent pole base at the hole in the ground elevate the pole on a saw horse or something enough for the bottom of the pole to catch into the hold in the ground hole. Then attach a piece of rope to the top of that pole so it will stay put and not slide. Then the rope goes back to the pulley on top of your temporary pole, then to your tractor draw bar or hitch. Then you can slowly move the tractor forward and it will lift the top of the pole as you go. The first movement you will have to be sure the bottom of the pole is going to go into the hole and not slide beyond it. Once you are sure the bottom of the pole will go in the hole as you lift - just slowly keep pulling. You might have to stop here and there to nudge the bottom of the pole some with a bar or something to make sure it goes where you want. Once the pole base is in the hole and almost all the way upright, then build a temporary brace to hold it as you get it perfectly vertical. Once the poll is almost verticle you can move it some by hand into a brace you already made. One hand holding the pole where you want it and the other hand with a hammer ready to drive the pre-started nails in your brace.

Don't know if I am explaining my method well or not. I did similar things for roof rafters, trusses, and roof sheathing - but I didn't have a tractor back then - all pulling on a rope by hand with the use of pulleys.
I understand what your saying & I like it! Really good idea & easy to rig up. I can put my wife on the tractor to help out too. I think if I take my time & set it up right it should work fine. Thank you!
 

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With two people using 3 pt would be a lot easier.
Either last summer (I think) I placed 6x6 14' poles by my self , get the post over close to the hole. Lift one end of post , push the other end of post into the hole lift it in the air. It won't fall over if in the ground 3-4' . attach a 2x4 10 or 12' long 6-7' from the ground up . Twist the pole around to where it is in line as needed . Place a stake in the ground to fasten the 2x4 to and then do same thing on other side to have at least 2 if not 3 braces . Plumb the pole either fill back in with dirt and tamp it as you fill or use the concrete . You can do this on either the one end or back just make sure all poles are in line . I would not do this to the other 3 sides till you make sure your building is square. Just because your building is 30' x say 20' and you set your poles 20' apart or 30' does not mean it is square.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
With two people using 3 pt would be a lot easier.
Either last summer (I think) I placed 6x6 14' poles by my self , get the post over close to the hole. Lift one end of post , push the other end of post into the hole lift it in the air. It won't fall over if in the ground 3-4' . attach a 2x4 10 or 12' long 6-7' from the ground up . Twist the pole around to where it is in line as needed . Place a stake in the ground to fasten the 2x4 to and then do same thing on other side to have at least 2 if not 3 braces . Plumb the pole either fill back in with dirt and tamp it as you fill or use the concrete . You can do this on either the one end or back just make sure all poles are in line . I would not do this to the other 3 sides till you make sure your building is square. Just because your building is 30' x say 20' and you set your poles 20' apart or 30' does not mean it is square.
Good idea here. As far as squaring, I put up a building some years ago. I'm pretty good at checking for square. The structure was 18' x 30'.
I was able to square it to within one inch on the 30' diagonal opposed corner posts. And its important to square it up. Although I was out only by 1 inch, I had to increase the length of the two or three last roof rafters to get rid of the inch. Its amazing how so little can show up sooner or later. When we were building the house I'm in now, my wife was driving me nuts because she thought that the lead framer was taking too long laying out sill plate caulk lines. But when the framing started, the house went up fast & everything was easy turn key construction because everything inside & out was square. Thanks for the ideas.
 

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Good idea here. As far as squaring, I put up a building some years ago. I'm pretty good at checking for square. The structure was 18' x 30'.
I was able to square it to within one inch on the 30' diagonal opposed corner posts. And its important to square it up. Although I was out only by 1 inch, I had to increase the length of the two or three last roof rafters to get rid of the inch. Its amazing how so little can show up sooner or later. When we were building the house I'm in now, my wife was driving me nuts because she thought that the lead framer was taking too long laying out sill plate caulk lines. But when the framing started, the house went up fast & everything was easy turn key construction because everything inside & out was square. Thanks for the ideas.
It took the guys that laid my kitchen tile over an hour to layout the floor. They were fighting so many out of square walls it was not even funny. If the bone head that built the house was a little better on his lay out it would have been no problem for them.


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I set all the poles by my self without a tractor when I built my barn. I dropped a 2x10 into the hole first so the end of the pole would not hangup on the far side of the hole and cave dirt into the hole. I dug a trench about 3' long and 1' deep at the post hole, tapering to nothing at the 3' end. Laid the post in the trench, end against the 2x10 and lifted the other end and walked it up and into the hole.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I set all the poles by my self without a tractor when I built my barn. I dropped a 2x10 into the hole first so the end of the pole would not hangup on the far side of the hole and cave dirt into the hole. I dug a trench about 3' long and 1' deep at the post hole, tapering to nothing at the 3' end. Laid the post in the trench, end against the 2x10 and lifted the other end and walked it up and into the hole.
I like your suggestion of placing a 2 x 10 in the hole. But as far as the trench goes, that won't happen here. This is South Carolina. Red clay soil here. There's only one way to work with the soil in this state. Bulldozer or dynamite. But the good thing is we have a zero frost line depth. So we can go out in January, February in the freezing winter temperature, around 50 on a really cold day, & play with the dirt, wearing a T shirt.

:yahoo::good2::usa:usa:usa
 

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I like your suggestion of placing a 2 x 10 in the hole. But as far as the trench goes, that won't happen here. This is South Carolina. Red clay soil here. There's only one way to work with the soil in this state. Bulldozer or dynamite. But the good thing is we have a zero frost line depth. So we can go out in January, February in the freezing winter temperature, around 50 on a really cold day, & play with the dirt, wearing a T shirt.

:yahoo::good2::usa:usa:usa
We can too, only difference we freeze ,,,,:laugh:
 
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