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Never built a pole barn but have mixed and then dumped, dumped and then watered as well as just dumped the quickrete (dry no water). I have had about equal success with all three ways on fences, porches, chicken coops and swing sets.
 

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I've always mixed and poured it in but a friend of mine that does cedar fences always does the "mix it in the hole" method - but he ONLY uses the fast setting concrete mix.
 

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Here in Minnesota morton buildings co. They set the poles in the hole then add dry sack Crete then fill with dirt. The ground moisture mixes to make cement over time.
When I built mine it was a menards kit and a friend that builds them for a living for a different company help me. He puts a 2x6 around the bottom of the pole then sets the pole and fills to the top with pea rock.
 

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I usually do it the hard way. Dig a hole too deep with the backhoe. Set a Sonotube into place. Backfill around the Sonotube with pea stone. Set the posts and double-check plumb, level and square. Mix and pour the Sakrete into the Sonotube. Built some real solid decks and pole buildings over the years. I'd go broke as a builder!
 

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Here in Minnesota morton buildings co. They set the poles in the hole then add dry sack Crete then fill with dirt. The ground moisture mixes to make cement over time.
When I built mine it was a menards kit and a friend that builds them for a living for a different company help me. He puts a 2x6 around the bottom of the pole then sets the pole and fills to the top with pea rock.
That's the way Morton used to do it 10 years ago, then they went to putting the poles on "stilts" and pouring ready mix in the hole, then in the last couple years they have went to a concrete "permacolumn"
I have used the pour in a couple bags of sack crete method, and have had good luck with it. I figure if it was good enough for Morton for 75 years it should be OK...even if they don't do it that way anymore.

Whatever method you use, I like to flood the hole with water a couple weeks after the building is complete. It helps everything settle good and all the voids from the back filling gets worked out.
 

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Place a brick or piece of concrete block in the bottom the hole, set post on top of that, pour in quikcrete with gravel and add water. Level and brace accordingly.

That method has always worked for me. Good luck.
 

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That's the way Morton used to do it 10 years ago, then they went to putting the poles on "stilts" and pouring ready mix in the hole, then in the last couple years they have went to a concrete "permacolumn"
I have used the pour in a couple bags of sack crete method, and have had good luck with it. I figure if it was good enough for Morton for 75 years it should be OK...even if they don't do it that way anymore.

Whatever method you use, I like to flood the hole with water a couple weeks after the building is complete. It helps everything settle good and all the voids from the back filling gets worked out.
I see things have changed since I built in 2004. Haven't looked since. Thanks for the update
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I usually do it the hard way. Dig a hole too deep with the backhoe. Set a Sonotube into place. Backfill around the Sonotube with pea stone. Set the posts and double-check plumb, level and square. Mix and pour the Sakrete into the Sonotube. Built some real solid decks and pole buildings over the years. I'd go broke as a builder!
I was planning on mixing it and dumping it in. When I set fence posts, I dump it in dry and add a gallon of water, or so. I'm now leaning towards the latter for the pole barn posts. I see enough replies here that support that.

Thanks everyone!
 

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Place a brick or piece of concrete block in the bottom the hole, set post on top of that, pour in quikcrete with gravel and add water. Level and brace accordingly.

That method has always worked for me. Good luck.
I do something similar.

Overdig holes 4-6" then mix and pour increase for a pad in the bottom, tamping it to get just the right grade in the middle for the pole then cover it, plastic or a foam board to let it cure till the next day or so.

Then I set the pole, if it's under a load, static or wind I mix and pour it full of concrete and top with dirt or pea gravel, if it's just a line post for fence or a bird feeder, etc I pack the dirt from the hole around the post.
 

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I was planning on mixing it and dumping it in. When I set fence posts, I dump it in dry and add a gallon of water, or so. I'm now leaning towards the latter for the pole barn posts. I see enough replies here that support that.

Thanks everyone!
Morton would put a bag in the bottom of the hole first also, so it would make a nice bottom to support the post. They didn't like putting a disk, brick, or paver at the bottom, because the post would never sit flat on it.
 

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Our 3 Structural buildings had trucks come in and pour is a base for the poles to sit on.

When my dad, brother and myself set poles for a coverall "building" for hay, we dug the hole, set the post, dumped in umptine bags of quickcrete, add water, get full body workout mixing cement, and finally screw in 2x4's so pole sets straight. We are/were definitely amateurs! :lol: But, we knew the building was only temporary and wanted the cement to come up with the poles when we took it down. Definitely put the cement below the pole for the base.

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If the post going in the ground is wood I would not put concrete around it.
I've always put 2 bags of Sakrete/Quikrete in the hole, no water. Makes for a good base and easy plumbing of the pole. Ground moisture will harden the premix.

The contractor I had do our garage went one step further.

Post #4
http://www.greentractortalk.com/forums/barns-buildings/1874-my-20-x-32-kistler-building.html
Dang dude, that building is no joke.
Some serious materials in there.
I love it.:good2:
 

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Concrete around a wooden post promotes premature rotting. I and many I know jam rocks from digging the hole and the fill that came out of it in packed layers. It drains, it becomes tighter as things settle and belongs in the hole it came out of when the post is gone. I have set many poles and fence posts and never had a failure, oh and it's FREE as well.
 

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Concrete around a wooden post promotes premature rotting. I and many I know jam rocks from digging the hole and the fill that came out of it in packed layers. It drains, it becomes tighter as things settle and belongs in the hole it came out of when the post is gone. I have set many poles and fence posts and never had a failure, oh and it's FREE as well.
My brother was talking with the owner of the company where he buys his metal roofing, siding. This company builds post building over the tri state area. the pressure treated company advises not to put concrete around the post because it will pull away from the post as it dries and then allow water to come sides of the post. The owner also advised to put either a layer of stone or bricks with holes in the bottom of the hole.
 

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Interesting reading this thread. I have six posts to set once things dry out. All for garden gates. One gate is just a walk through, another big enough to get the wheel barrow through. The third one will be about six feet wide, wide enough to get the 1025r with the bagger and blower through. I was considering just using dirt and rock. Set many posts over the years with my grandfather when we had hogs out in the fields. We always dug the hole, set the post in and then put the dirt back and tamped it down. Grandpa used to say "a good tamper can get all the dirt back in the hole."


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