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Discussion Starter #1
All, my equipment shed has a wooden ramp leading up to it. It is probably 3-4" above grade on gravel, everything installed by the previous owner and his shed installer.

The area immediately in front of the ramp is a wet clay - have had to dig myself out of there so many times that it is now probably a foot below grade a soupy, especially after rain. My backhoe and mower deck are...you guessed it...tucked away inside the shed, behind the "moat". Thankfully I haven't been using my 60D deck for mowing this season.

How do I build it up for a permanent solution to this? Pile rocks/gravel on to the soup until they sink in enough to fill it up? Try to dig through the soup and remove everything I can in there until I'm on more "solid" ground? I think I read somewhere about using a landscape fabric in these situations or some sort of geotextile, but is that worthwhile?

I don't have convenient access to electric to pump it out. This area is approximately 6 feet wide in front of the shed ramp by 15 feet long.

I'd like to eventually do some trenching/drainage work at some point for this, but my current objective is to try to build the area up so I that I can easily get my equipment in and out of my shed.

Ready, go!
 

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for this problem, i believe the geotextile fabricate is the best way to go. lay it down right over the soup-ur calling it. then u need rock, stone,etc., to lay over the fabricate to the height of ur ramp. probably gonna need to add a couple of times, till it packs down right.

i had heard of doing this yrs ago, but seen what it can do in person. had several bad spots in a road we was trying to build-foreman brought a roll out with him the next morning, we laid it down over the bad spot, he brought stone in-dump truck backed up to in front of bad spot and dumped-i then took a D-7cat dozer and leveled that stone out over the fabricate-and ran the rock down with the dozer by tracking it in. next truck backed right over it:good2: his tires made some ruts in it-but i just kept back blading it thru out the day. it made a believer out of me after that.
 

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Personally, I would dig out the soup and fill with #53 gravel, and then cover with a finer gravel to finish it and make it look nice.
 

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Why is it wet? Is it a low spot? Are there springs?

If its just a low spot with poorly drained soil, then is it possible to build it up and slope it, so that it drains?
you could dig up the muck and put big rock in, I don't know what number #53 is that John123 mentioned, but it sounds big:laugh:.
Then topcoat and pack with class 5 or something.
 

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As mentioned, get some heavy landscape fabric. Road Mat is even better. Find a road construction place and ask them about it. Timber or logging companies will have (or know where to get) some.
Once the barrier is in place, put 3" crush down as a base, pack it, then add 1-1/4 minus over the top and pack that in.
 

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if it's a spring you need to direct it somewhere else. Otherwise it's just going to come up somewhere else you don't want it. Murphy's Law puts that at the edge of the shed until the shed settles to that side.:banghead:
 

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Why is it wet? Is it a low spot? Are there springs?

If its just a low spot with poorly drained soil, then is it possible to build it up and slope it, so that it drains?
you could dig up the muck and put big rock in, I don't know what number #53 is that John123 mentioned, but it sounds big:laugh:.
Then topcoat and pack with class 5 or something.

#53 is about 1-3.5 inch shards with binder (i think 50% rock and 50% binder) The INDOT uses it for building highways here. I have used it on a few drives I have built and it works great. You pack it down and it turns to concrete when wet. I usually finish with #2 to make it look nice.
 

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I've used geo-fabric for a couple home projects lately and I like it. My suggestion would be to drain the hole as much as possible (siphon if you have to), then line it with geo-fabric. To save some cash, start filling it with creek rock, field stone, concrete chunks, etc. Top it off with a load of gravel. I'd put a french drain around the perimeter to help keep most of the water from re-entering the hole.
 

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I've used geo-fabric for a couple home projects lately and I like it. My suggestion would be to drain the hole as much as possible (siphon if you have to), then line it with geo-fabric. To save some cash, start filling it with creek rock, field stone, concrete chunks, etc. Top it off with a load of gravel. I'd put a french drain around the perimeter to help keep most of the water from re-entering the hole.
Yes, Geotextile is the way to go. That, by the way is road mat. I would dig it out until you hit solid hard pan. Put 4s then 2s then modified. I did this under my workshop, and there was an area as you describe, did this before pouring the footer and all was well for the footer. This will be much easier. Dig down and line it like it was a pool. Fill it up and problem solved. Make sure ypu go down a minimum of 2 feet and try not to disturb the hard pan just under the geotextile, or rather where the geotextile will lay. Without ypu have to put much more rock, and ypu will have no guarantee of sucess, as the stone will get infultrate by the muck.
Bill
Bill

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Your issue is the water. Redirect it first and then go from there.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
As mentioned, get some heavy landscape fabric. Road Mat is even better. Find a road construction place and ask them about it. Timber or logging companies will have (or know where to get) some.
Once the barrier is in place, put 3" crush down as a base, pack it, then add 1-1/4 minus over the top and pack that in.
Priced out road mat... they charge a three mat minimum and about 350 in shipping. $1000. Not for this little project ...
 

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Why is the area wet? I guess I don’t see the appeal of fabric. If the area is sloped and compacted, it should drain and be dry.
 

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Priced out road mat... they charge a three mat minimum and about 350 in shipping. $1000. Not for this little project ...
Check ebay.

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Priced out road mat... they charge a three mat minimum and about 350 in shipping. $1000. Not for this little project ...
Road Mat is basically a heavier duty weed barrier similar to what's used for gardens. I have no idea where you are specifically. Try searching Google, locally to you, for Heavy Duty Weed Barrier. The heavier the cloth/fabric the better. Worse case scenario, residential grade can be used doubled if necessary.

Perhaps you have a Plant Nursery close by? That may be a good starting point.

Worth mentioning, avoid weed barrier with a shiny surface, if burying. Whatever is put on top of it will slide.

This may get you heading in the right direction for your area. https://www.landmsupplyco.com/landscapingsupplies
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Priced out road mat... they charge a three mat minimum and about 350 in shipping. $1000. Not for this little project ...
Here's the stuff I used.
Thanks - at twelve inches wide I figure I would need at least four of this lined up next to each other to Cover the width of the machine

Coming in under $400 still not trivial cash
 

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I often see people trying to sell or give away used paving stones and patio blocks. Maybe you could find some of them to put in front of your shed.
 

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Thanks - at twelve inches wide I figure I would need at least four of this lined up next to each other to Cover the width of the machine

Coming in under $400 still not trivial cash
It's 12 FEET, not inches... :flag_of_truce:
 

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All, my equipment shed has a wooden ramp leading up to it. It is probably 3-4" above grade on gravel, everything installed by the previous owner and his shed installer.

The area immediately in front of the ramp is a wet clay - have had to dig myself out of there so many times that it is now probably a foot below grade a soupy, especially after rain. My backhoe and mower deck are...you guessed it...tucked away inside the shed, behind the "moat". Thankfully I haven't been using my 60D deck for mowing this season.

How do I build it up for a permanent solution to this? Pile rocks/gravel on to the soup until they sink in enough to fill it up? Try to dig through the soup and remove everything I can in there until I'm on more "solid" ground? I think I read somewhere about using a landscape fabric in these situations or some sort of geotextile, but is that worthwhile?

I don't have convenient access to electric to pump it out. This area is approximately 6 feet wide in front of the shed ramp by 15 feet long.

I'd like to eventually do some trenching/drainage work at some point for this, but my current objective is to try to build the area up so I that I can easily get my equipment in and out of my shed.

Ready, go!
Use a portable generator for the electric supply to pump it out?
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Decided on some geo/Agro fabric as an underlayment for the four inch deep Geogrid by standart-park

They recommend filling it with 3/4 crusher run

Wasn’t sure aboit the base/... make a base under the fabric ? Or on top of the fabric and under the grid ? Use 3/4 minus for a base as well ? Or something b
 
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