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All, my property has significant clay content - when it rains it turns to soup and obviously is a ton of fun to drive a 1025R on when it get wet.

I have some areas that pool water after the lightest rain and I'm going to install french drains for them - not sure if I'll do a dry well at the end of the drains

What tips do you all have for how to get my property to drain appropriately given my significant clay burden? I've been told by arborists that the excess moisture is killing the trees on it. It's about 3 acres.
 

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All, my property has significant clay content - when it rains it turns to soup and obviously is a ton of fun to drive a 1025R on when it get wet.

I have some areas that pool water after the lightest rain and I'm going to install french drains for them - not sure if I'll do a dry well at the end of the drains

What tips do you all have for how to get my property to drain appropriately given my significant clay burden? I've been told by arborists that the excess moisture is killing the trees on it. It's about 3 acres.
You do have a couple options. We deal with this in development all the time in central OH. The cheapest by far is trying to grade some swales from your problem spots. This isn't too bad if you have some elevation to work with, just takes time and some reseeding.

If your land is pretty flat, you can try french drains. If you don't have a good place to outlet them, you're going to have to use drywells too.

Just a word of warning, in Ohio it's against the law to divert drainage from your property to another's if it doesn't naturally drain there.
 

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You do have a couple options. We deal with this in development all the time in central OH. The cheapest by far is trying to grade some swales from your problem spots. This isn't too bad if you have some elevation to work with, just takes time and some reseeding.

If your land is pretty flat, you can try french drains. If you don't have a good place to outlet them, you're going to have to use drywells too.

Just a word of warning, in Ohio it's against the law to divert drainage from your property to another's if it doesn't naturally drain there.
I wished WV had that law. My neighbor drives me crazy with his digging his property up that is on a hill and now ALL of his mud/water drains to my farm. I am going to have to install a French drain/drywell to end my problem.
 

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I wished WV had that law. My neighbor drives me crazy with his digging his property up that is on a hill and now ALL of his mud/water drains to my farm. I am going to have to install a French drain/drywell to end my problem.
A couple things to look into,
  • Does your area have Soil and Water Conservation District? They have a lot of pull around here, especially if someone is a detriment to a farmer
  • If it really bothers you (and you're not worried about retaliation) you could get the EPA involved. Again, Ohio EPA would be all over him if they got a call about that, we get it for construction sites all the time. Does WV EPA have any sort of presence?
Just a few thoughts, troublesome neighbors are a giant PITA.
 

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Central Ohioian here with a wet lot...

French drains can be your best friend!!! Not a 100% cure, but properly sized and installed they have helped me manage lots of water issues on my flat property WITHOUT transferring the problem to a neighbor.

Jason


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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I wished WV had that law. My neighbor drives me crazy with his digging his property up that is on a hill and now ALL of his mud/water drains to my farm. I am going to have to install a French drain/drywell to end my problem.
Central Ohioian here with a wet lot...

French drains can be your best friend!!! Not a 100% cure, but properly sized and installed they have helped me manage lots of water issues on my flat property WITHOUT transferring the problem to a neighbor.

Jason


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
I had the same problem Billie, but NY is a common enemy state. So, water is a common enemy to all and it’s up to you to deal with it.

So with my 12” of beautiful rock free topsoil, then nothing but clay, I went the French drain route. As firemoore states, it had done wonders. There are more areas I could drain, but as long as the 1026R can mow it and not need MFWD, or leave tire marks, I’m good.
 

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A couple things to look into,
  • Does your area have Soil and Water Conservation District? They have a lot of pull around here, especially if someone is a detriment to a farmer
  • If it really bothers you (and you're not worried about retaliation) you could get the EPA involved. Again, Ohio EPA would be all over him if they got a call about that, we get it for construction sites all the time. Does WV EPA have any sort of presence?
Just a few thoughts, troublesome neighbors are a giant PITA.
Yep, got the EPA, county engineers, and the Maryland Potomac Water Shed which BTW is the EPA involved since my stream drains into the Potomac River, they washed their hands of it. WV/County laws don't give you much to lean on. So I took it into my own hands. I currently dug a 3' wide by 4' deep trench along the edge of my property. That helped with the mud sediment. Pissed my neighbor off since it is in the front of his house, but on my property, but I do not care at this point, I told him three times in as many months to fix the problem or I would. In the next few months I plan on digging a larger hole 8' wide X 4' deep to make a French drain and drywell, then dig a drain down to and in front of my equipment shed. In front of the shed I plan on digging down 4' making a French drain field with piping and large gravel to have any excess drain down across my field into the stream. By that time the water should be clear run off water. I get a chance I show you a picture of what I am dealing with.
 

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A couple things to look into,
  • Does your area have Soil and Water Conservation District? They have a lot of pull around here, especially if someone is a detriment to a farmer
  • If it really bothers you (and you're not worried about retaliation) you could get the EPA involved. Again, Ohio EPA would be all over him if they got a call about that, we get it for construction sites all the time. Does WV EPA have any sort of presence?
Just a few thoughts, troublesome neighbors are a giant PITA.
Being a farmer check into the AG and market (FEDERAL) they have a lot of pull.
 

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I have clay soil also and here's what I did.First you need to aerate your lawn.This helps the roots of the grass get deeper and thicker.During the growing season more roots need more water and this help in drying the lawn.Next drain your low areas.I added drain tile in low sections that the water is pitched to.I just used surface drains.Don't have the tile too shallow,the mice will use it as a highway and chew openings like where the french drains are.I don't recommend the the black flex pipe.Go with the SDR 35.I used the triple wall pipe for mine due to I got it cheap from a leftover job and they didn't want to return it.
Here are a few picks of the job.
 

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