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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I came home from work today to find one chicken had been attacked by what looks to be a dog. I assume it was a dog given the bite marks and proximity to the house. Tonight I just locked up the coop and saw one chicken didn't turn in for the night, which has never happened, so I assume it is dead. It seems like the injured chicken will probably recover but that is yet to be seen.. currently she won't leave the egg hutch.

All this said, how would you all handle the situation. About this time last year I had animal control pay a neighbor a visit after their dog bit mine. Well.. I didn't so much have them pay them a visit as I asked what the law was in regards to shooting their dog. The animal control folks decided they'd warn the neighbor to keep their dog on their property; hoping to avoid the dog needing to be shot. Since then we've had 2 more families move out this way so its hard to say who's dog it was, though I suspect it was the same family.

I have Monday off work so I may just sit upstairs with the window open and a rifle loaded.. what would you all do? It's probably worth noting that the animal control visit had no lasting impact in regards to my neighbors letting their dogs run wild.
 

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Happened to us once. I found a dog in the coop with about four dead birds. The dog had a tag so I found and contacted the owners. They came clean and paid for the birds plus some. Never saw the dog again. Unfortunately not all neighbours are as responsible.


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Trail camera with it set to take video aimed at the area where the attacks were. Get the owner on trespass (the dog), and maybe an attack, or if you're present some aggressive behavior before the red mist.

A wireless baby monitor webcam recorder could work too.

If you have an idea where pooch is coming from you could set a snare too. "Thought it was a yote."

Good luck!
 

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First off, don't expect animal control to give you legal advice on shooting domesticated animals. Either look up the law for yourself or contact a lawyer. "Animal control said...." is not a defense if you are sued.

We have had issues with domesticated dogs killing our chickens. Our whole perimeter is fenced with cattle fence but the dogs love to dig under. People around here sucked at keeping their dogs confined. I would catch the dog or follow the dog after running it off and then explain to neighbors to keep the dog up. Second time I would call animal control and third time I'd kill the dog.

It wasn't the dogs fault and it always made me sick doing it but we had to protect our chickens. In georgia it is perfectly legal to kill animals in defense of livestock as long as you put the animal down as fast as possible. Do not try to just wound an animal to scare it off, that can be considered animal cruelty.

Be prepared to be the "dog killer" should you go this route. People have a tendency to see what you are contemplating as wrong no matter the justification. I have been screamed at, cussed at, sued and had crying children brought to me as an example of the harm done. Be prepared.

And not a single owner ever cared that our chickens provided 4 dozen eggs weekly to the children's shelter, it was still just a chicken which isn't worth killing a dog over.
 

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I too would go with the high tech approach at first and gather the evidence of what and who's dog is attacking the chickens. Then I would skip the dog warden and go directly to law enforcement. Let the law work for you and not against you after you pull the trigger.

Remember the first to call the police has a better leg to stand on in court.




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I too would go with the high tech approach at first and gather the evidence of what and who's dog is attacking the chickens. Then I would skip the dog warden and go directly to law enforcement. Let the law work for you and not against you after you pull the trigger.

Remember the first to call the police has a better leg to stand on in court.




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If NC is anything like GA, the LEA you call will refer you to animal control.
 

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Game Camera will hold up better as evidence rather than a hunch in the eyes of those who judge your actions.
 

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Probably shouldn't be killing an animal not caught in the act, even with pictures as evidence.

Proof should be turned over to the authorities and let them handle it.
 

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Had a neighbor once that had chickens, lots of them. All running loose. They came into our property and took out 123 tomatoes. I called the local sheriff's office. They said they can't do anything. I asked them what the law was as far as me shooting them if I catch them on our property, destroying our property. They told I can shoot them but not to do so and I should talk to the neighbor. So I asked again just to clarify, can I shoot them? They said "yes". I went to the neighbor and told them what happened. He looked at me and at the 123 tomatoes that were ruined and told me "shoot the damn chickens if they come on your property again". And he also told me to shoot their dog the next time it comes on our property harassing our dogs or attacking me. Which is something else I told him about when I was talking to him. I know it's just tomatoes, but my wife cans them and it is our food till the next year. We barely had enough to make sandwiches that year. Chickens don't like green tomatoes, just the red ones. They went through and pecked the tomatoes and if it was green they went to the next one till they found a red one. The chickens were put up and didn't come on our property again but the damage was done. I was also told by the "law" that I could sue them but that is something I didn't want to do and didn't do. :snipersmilie:
 

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Laws may be different where your at. But shooting dogs is not legal. You'd get in less trouble for shooting the owner.

Are you sure it was a dog ? Could be a coyote or other wild predator.

Around here a free running chicken wouldn't last long, best to keep them in a predator prof pen.

With that said, do what you have to do. Just do not get caught. If someone were to shoot my dog I would retaliate. It would likely make the news. Is a chicken really worth it the trouble shooting a dog could cause ???
 

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Trail camera with it set to take video aimed at the area where the attacks were. Get the owner on trespass (the dog), and maybe an attack, or if you're present some aggressive behavior before the red mist.
While I fully understand the "in the heat of the moment" wish to shoot the dog, I think Jim Timber's suggestion is the right way to go. You shoot someone's dog and it's likely to end up with a he said/she said sort of thing for weeks on end with the police and possibly the courts.

I had a similar issue when I lived down in OK. One time, a couple of my chickens went into the neighbor's yard and their dog killed 2 of them. My fault on that on. I owned it. Another time, his dog came into my yard (over a 4' chain link fence) and killed 4. He paid for their replacements and then built a large fenced run for his dog so it wouldn't happen again. It's hard to find good neighbors.

Good luck!
 

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It would be legal to shoot the dog(s) in Texas, IF they were caught in the act. Just having one come onto your property is NOT just cause.

If possible, I'd go the camera route, and if I had proof, I'd talk to the neighbor and explain things and see if he'd replace the chickens and attempt to keep his dog home.
 

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Go the camera route first. Not sure the law in your state ,but like others have said you'll be in more trouble for shooting the dog than shooting the neighbor.
Get the dog on camera , in the act , and then show the neighbor and the law. Let them handle , good luck.
 

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Sitting here thinking about this thread. As a land surveyor, I see neighbor issues EVERY spring as everybody comes out of hibernation. This is true for me as well this spring as a situation over drainage escalated and went way bad for me yesterday. I guess sometimes, at least for me, it doesn't pay to be the nice, patient level headed guy. I am not sure what type of person the OP's neighbor is, but I urge everyone to use caution and let common sense reign supreme any time when dealing with these neighbor issues.


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I think it might be a stretch of an assumption that your neighbors dog is the culprit. You mention in your post that the neighbors dog had been aggressive towards your dog a year ago. In that year that has passed you don't mention the neighbors animal being aggressive towards your chickens. It has been my experience that whether its a dog or a coyote or any other predatory animal that when they find what they consider to be a food source they keep coming back until that food source is depleted, or in the case of 'yotes, they will kill them all in a frenzy. It seems unusual that if the neighbors dog knew the chickens were there, that a year or more would pass without incident, and then he would kill off one or two. It would put you in an awful spot if you were to kill that dog and then find out that a hawk or owl or some other predator was the culprit. I would mount up a trail cam and sleep on it for a few days before taking an action that you can't take back.
 

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I would mount up a trail cam and sleep on it for a few days before taking an action that you can't take back.
Well said



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I had a neighbors 2 dobermans chase me into my house once, I called him and asked if they were his and he replied yes, I informed him if it happens again I will mail him their collars. Never saw them again near my house
 
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