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Discussion Starter #1
Anyone have a good trick to keep the snow from sticking to a snow plow blade or is this something you all never worry about? It seems that when I back up it falls off and then I have to go back over where I just was.
 

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I have used "pam" from the kitchen.

Doug
 

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Nothing really helps well. I tried with covering a section with teflon tape, that did not work, spraying it with teflon worked for a short while, but it got rather expensive after I ran out of the lab samples!
 

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Since I buy WD-40 by the gallon that's what I use. Sticky snow is caused by water content in the snow and temperature of the blade in relation to the snow. I have not been treating my blade since it's been so cold here for every "named storm" and it hasn't been sticking. But, for shovels and in 25ºF+ I spray the WD out of a Windex sprayer and give it a good coating. It lasts until the town plowed snow wipes it all off.

I run into problems with the double thickness of my steel cutting edge and the rubber squeegee behind it. It makes an effective "shelf" for the snow to hold on to and then fall off later. Nothing to be done about that but a quick "wiggle" side to side with the hydraulics (which works sometimes).

ALWAYS make sure your blade or snow blower is at the ambient air temperature before you hit the first drift, especially indoor/heating stored equipment. AND make sure the exhaust of your machine is directed totally away from the attachment. Nothing freezes up snow equipment like constant exhaust heating it.
 

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Go to the Dollar Store and buy cheap Pledge (furniture waxing spray) It works great on snowblower impellers and chutes, snow shovels, buckets and blades. You have to keep it inside since it will not spray if frozen, but it has many great uses in the shop. I spray light fixtures and ceiling fans with it. They dust so much easier and It works great on many other pieces of equipment. Everything pressure washes or cleans up better with a coat of wax. Just don't something if you plan on painting it.
Don't worry about wiping it off on blades and buckets. The snow will even it out. It lasts far better than WD-40 and environmentally friendly.
 

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Car wax.
 

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I've use whatever I have but in general I don't worry about it. I will say a good paint on the moldboard does as well as anything.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
The tractor and blade sleep in a nun heated garage so the blade is as cold as it is going to get. I have about 5-6 cans of wd40 that were condensed from different parts of the house when we last moved, so I probably try that first. I also thought about ski and snowboard wax
 

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I know epoxy paint is pretty slick. One of the guys I worked with brought his snow blower into work and we sprayed it with epoxy paint. He said the snow flew out of there pretty good and it helped alot with the heavy wet snow not clogging it up. Some of the WD-40 type sprays, especially the one with teflon help a bit. To me it's more work and expense than it's worth to keep spraying the blade with chemicals.
 

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Car wax. But that pledge idea sounds good too.
 

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Half the problem with operating a snow blower is the operator not taking into consideration snow type, what the blower wants to feed correctly and not clog. You can clog any snowblower in any conditions if you want to. You can also avoid pretty much ALL clogs by just learning what the thing needs in operation.

I heard so much crap about single stage blowers not being able to blow this kind or that kind of snow and not being able to throw it more than 5' that I was disappointed that there was no 2 stage units for my GX. I should have remembered the single stage walker my old neighbor restored, it kept up with my Airens 2 stage walker with zero trouble! My single stage 42" on a GX335 replaced my mothballed Snapper 8/26 and no matter the conditions neither of them will clog when I'm paying attention...

Fluff like the last snow here to gray sloppy slush in years past... it all comes out the spout and goes way off the pavement no problem. Forward feed speeds, throttle setting (WOT), how much of a row width to take all add up to good/bad results. And I say again, if there is not quite enough snow to "get the distance" per pass, blow it right down into the next pass row and keep doing that until there's enough to throw it all the way to the neighbor's yard. Blowers want volume to get distance...
 

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ALWAYS make sure your blade or snow blower is at the ambient air temperature before you hit the first drift, especially indoor/heating stored equipment. AND make sure the exhaust of your machine is directed totally away from the attachment.
Pretty much it!
 
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