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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi all,
I have been doing painting around the house. Ran out of the new oil based paint I had purchased recently and remembered I had an old can of Sherwin Williams of the same color. Can is most likely 18 years old. Used a mixer on the electric drill as everything had settled out. Seemed to mix up just fine. Painted the inside of the garage exterior door with it. Seemed a little thick, but spread ok. Have been waiting days now for it to dry out and it is still tacky.:dunno: :gaah: It is green....(hunter green) Just not JD green, although the wife was thinking I was going to paint it that. Any suggestions?
Bill
 

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:dunno:too bad u didn't mix in a bit of thinner, while stirring it up. might of then dried faster:unknown:eek:ther than that--i have the faintest idea to help ya.:dunno:
 

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Years ago I brought home some OLD paints. Quality stuff, and never opened. Some of it dated back over 50 years, but it mixed up well and spread fine.
I also come to the same situation as you are now, several times. Some dried, but it took longer than you would expect, some didn't, and it had to be scraped off and wiped down to get it off.
Heat and air circulation is your best friend. Actually your last resort before things get real messy. Meaning clean it all off, or toss the door and get another one.
 

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Hi all,
I have been doing painting around the house. Ran out of the new oil based paint I had purchased recently and remembered I had an old can of Sherwin Williams of the same color. Can is most likely 18 years old. Used a mixer on the electric drill as everything had settled out. Seemed to mix up just fine. Painted the inside of the garage exterior door with it. Seemed a little thick, but spread ok. Have been waiting days now for it to dry out and it is still tacky.:dunno: :gaah: It is green....(hunter green) Just not JD green, although the wife was thinking I was going to paint it that. Any suggestions?
Bill
I have never had that issue using old paint but maybe some heat will help you out? If it's been cold in your area and maybe it has or humid/damp, that may be why it's taking so long to dry? If you have a portable heater like a kerosine torpedo heater run it for a bit and see what happens... At this point you have nothing to lose! If all else fails wash it down with thinner and start over with new paint? Sorry, that's the best I can offer.. You didn't paint with oil over latex did you? That's a no-no.. I have seen that occur and take forever to dry and really just peeled off.. Last resort, call Sherwin Williams rep at your nearest paint store and ask them what can be done. Good luck..
 

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Are you sure that the paint while in storage did not fully or partially freeze. I would call S-W's help line & ask them. But since you already used it, I don't see much you can do about it but given enough time it will probably dry. The question is will it hold up or fail & under what conditions.
 

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Oil paints (aka alkyd enamels) do not "dry" per se, they cure.

Two steps - solvent evaporation and then polymerization. Modern alkyds use synthetic resins to speed up the cure. The older natural resins cured by oxidation, for which you need heat and oxygen. The curing process produces some of its own heat (this is why you have to be careful about disposing of linseed and oil paint soaked rags lest they spontaneously combust).

Point a salamander at it for 8 hours and see if that advances things along.

Al
 

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Are you sure that the paint while in storage did not fully or partially freeze. I would call S-W's help line & ask them. But since you already used it, I don't see much you can do about it but given enough time it will probably dry. The question is will it hold up or fail & under what conditions.
The freezing point of old school oil paint, i.e. linseed oil based, is -4F, which is damn cold for the inside of even an unheated structure. Regardless, freezing these types of paints will slow oxidation and thus actually help preserve them.

Al
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks Guys. Will try the suggestions. I think it was to thick. May have to scrape some areas. Some have almost dried. Oh well. Live and learn. Should not have frozen where it was.
 

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In the distant past, my own observation has been that when paint freezes & then thaws & you have it sitting around a while & you go to mix-stir it before use, it has lumps in it like that of cottage cheese & those lumps will not break down & mix smoothly. Just my experience with it many many years ago.
 

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Go to the paint store ( a real paint store) and buy some japan dryer. Put it in a misting spray bottle and wet the whole thing down it will be dry in no time. Had the exact same thing happen to me. Japan dryer will rejuvenate any old oil paint, best when mixed in before application but this trick will work.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
In the distant past, my own observation has been that when paint freezes & then thaws & you have it sitting around a while & you go to mix-stir it before use, it has lumps in it like that of cottage cheese & those lumps will not break down & mix smoothly. Just my experience with it many many years ago.
No, mixed out smooth as velvet. It finally dried. My guess is temp and different paint type, and my impatients all played a roll. Did thin it some, and dried much more quickly. Like the Japan additive idea though.

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