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When I purchased my property it came with 2 sheds and one "house" from the late 1800's adjacent to the real house I live in now. The shed used to house my tractor is a plastic POS that is too small. However, one of the sheds is a newer Tuffshed in great shape, probably 12 by 20 if I had to guess on size. I'd like to move it to the spot my plastic POS shed currently sits about 80 feet away.

Anyone here know how you move a shed of this size without causing any damage?
 

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Google "How to move a shed" and there are dozens of posts that come up.

One method is to check with one of the local companies that sell them - perhaps the place it was purchased from. They usually have a small Segway-like tractor machine and some boogie wheels. It's possible they would be willing to wheel it over to the new location for a reasonable fee.
 

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Put in cross braces, lift one end, set on trailer, lift other end and push on trailer. Reverse to unload.

For your short distance you could possibly put it on skids and drag it
 

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When I moved into my country place, I inherited a 12x16 Tuff Shed, but it was nowhere near where I wanted it. So I turned it 180 degrees and moved it about 70ft south. If you can believe it, the door was facing completely away from any of the other buildings or house. Completely wrong. To move it, I used 2 inch steel pipe as rollers. I jacked it up and placed the "rollers" under it, then hooked up my tractor and my neighbors tractor to it so we could turn it and move to the new location. I also created skids under the shed so they could allow the shed to move on the rollers. I hooked each tractor to a skid so that we could better turn it.

The outside tractor did the turning before moving it straight to the new location. I don't know how old this Tuff Shed is, but the newer ones have a metal bottom that is pretty fragile and is not designed to be moved easily, hence the skids between the shed and the rollers. I used 2x12 planks for the skids and also had to use cross pieces to hold the skids apart by an appropriate distance.

This was a barn style shed with a loft in it, so it was pretty heavy. I guessed about 8000#. I contacted one of the tow truck places that used roll off beds. They wanted at least $400 to move it and could not guarantee that it would not be more.

Dave
 

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My wife wanted a chicken coop,,, I wanted to build it in my shed,,,
.air tools, electricity,,, and shade!! :good2:



This coop is pretty close to the size of the shed you want to move.
I have two pices of 3X6 inch rectangular steel tube I keep for this type thing.
The tubes are 12 feet long, and fit over the forks.





Sorry for the small,, old pics,,, :dunno:

 

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My wife wanted a chicken coop,,, I wanted to build it in my shed,,,
.air tools, electricity,,, and shade!! :good2:



This coop is pretty close to the size of the shed you want to move.
I have two pices of 3X6 inch rectangular steel tube I keep for this type thing.
The tubes are 12 feet long, and fit over the forks.





Sorry for the small,, old pics,,, :dunno:



12' x 20' ?
 

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12' x 20' ?
Exactly? :dunno:
The width is 12 feet.
The length may only be 16 or 18 feet,,,

There is a lot of extra weight in the coop, a big portion of the floor is treated 2X4"'s screwed together about 1 inch apart.
There is a big cabinet built in the front for food and water storage.

so,, it is close,, and I know the loader could still pick it up at a few more feet in size.
 

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When I moved into my country place, I inherited a 12x16 Tuff Shed, but it was nowhere near where I wanted it. So I turned it 180 degrees and moved it about 70ft south. If you can believe it, the door was facing completely away from any of the other buildings or house. Completely wrong. To move it, I used 2 inch steel pipe as rollers. I jacked it up and placed the "rollers" under it, then hooked up my tractor and my neighbors tractor to it so we could turn it and move to the new location. I also created skids under the shed so they could allow the shed to move on the rollers. I hooked each tractor to a skid so that we could better turn it.

The outside tractor did the turning before moving it straight to the new location. I don't know how old this Tuff Shed is, but the newer ones have a metal bottom that is pretty fragile and is not designed to be moved easily, hence the skids between the shed and the rollers. I used 2x12 planks for the skids and also had to use cross pieces to hold the skids apart by an appropriate distance.

This was a barn style shed with a loft in it, so it was pretty heavy. I guessed about 8000#. I contacted one of the tow truck places that used roll off beds. They wanted at least $400 to move it and could not guarantee that it would not be more.

Dave
Move it like the ancient Egyptians. My friend (from the no permit to build my shed fiasco) and I moved his shed this way. It was made out of old oak pallets and no floor. Jacked it up to get the pipes under it. Then put a strap around it and pulled it with his old 4X4 power wagon. Kept putting the pipes in front of shed in the direction of travel. I thought it was going to collapse but to my surprise it worked.

And no he didn't get a permit. lol
 

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When I purchased my property it came with 2 sheds and one "house" from the late 1800's adjacent to the real house I live in now. The shed used to house my tractor is a plastic POS that is too small. However, one of the sheds is a newer Tuffshed in great shape, probably 12 by 20 if I had to guess on size. I'd like to move it to the spot my plastic POS shed currently sits about 80 feet away.

Anyone here know how you move a shed of this size without causing any damage?
IRQVT- Late last summer I submitted a post with some photos of a shed move on property near mine in southern Ohio. The mover jacked up one end of the shed, placed some bogie wheels under it, then used the jack to lift up the other end and wheel it about 3/4 of a mile to it's new location. I helped with my 4-wheeler when the Buffalo forklift lost traction in soft soil. I've searched my posts for this post and accompanying photos, to no avail.

Your situation sounds exactly like the one I helped with last summer; If I find the post, I'll provide detail to you.

Good luck,

Brian
 

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We tried to move a 12x16 shed with the NH3930 that my dad had at the time, using forks on the loader. It wouldn't begin to lift it. They are heavier than you think. We lifted one end, put down runners, and pushed it with the loader from one place to the other. Took a little bit of time, and it started raining on us, but we got it done without damage.
 

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I've dragged a smaller one, 10 x 12 with a 955 for the church. I put 4 x 4 runners under it, large threaded eye bolts on the end two runners and a chain. It moved easily but it was going across a parking lot about 150'.

For our shed moving adventure a few years back I hired a local shed company with a nice telescoping trailer that did 90% of the work! :good2: $300 / shed at that time, we had them move two we bought from a campground about 3 miles away that auctioned off the cabins. That was a stressful day until they were set in place in one piece!

Here is one being set in place. Just had to re-attach the deck that we took off for the move and put the support posts back in place.

DSC09894.JPG

DSC09905.JPG

DSC09916.JPG
 

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Or this way

skiding it
 

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If you can't improvise some wheels easy, then I'd also vote for skidding.

Egyptian method on logs sounds like a lot of herding cats to keep the thing going where you want it and a lot of work moving the rollers from back to front.

At the end of the day, there's gotta be some unwanted aspen or some other junk tree in the 6-10" diameter range that you can whip into a carriage and drag without making too much of a mess.
 

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I have moved several conventionally built sheds, small barns, and chicken coops using trucks or tractors. If you only have a short distance over realitivly even ground, skidding is the easiest way that I have found.

My go-to method is to re-enforce the structure as needed so that it remains square durring the trip. Then I either dig out or jack up the building enough to get two runners under the next joist in from the rim joist ; 4x4's for small buildings, 4x6's laid wide side down for larger ones. They can be sistered together if additional length is needed. The ends of the runners should stick out about a foot and be beveled... the steeper the better. I attach them to the floor joists with screws and strips of plywood. I run a large lag bolt with an eye straight into each runner. Attach your tow chains to the eyes so that they are of equal length and hook up the tow vehicle. Drive as slowly as possible, avoiding sharp turns and un-even ground. Don't forget to keep an eye out for trees and other overhead obstacles. I have had the best luck near the end of a dry-spell when the ground is more stable.

Good luck!
(Also: don't forget to update us with pictures!)
 

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One method is to check with one of the local companies that sell them - perhaps the place it was purchased from. They usually have a small Segway-like tractor machine and some boogie wheels. It's possible they would be willing to wheel it over to the new location for a reasonable fee.
This was probably the best thing I did... I tried to pick half of a 12 x20 last summer with my 4044R. Neither the loader with forks or the 3 point with bale forks properly ballasted would lift the shed more than a couple of inches off the ground. Called the number on the tag over the door and asked the gentleman if it was pinned down in a way that I couldn't see and how much it weighed. He said around 5000 lbs and no pins. He came over the next night after work and for a $50 bill he scooted his little Honda powered Segway under it and we put dolly wheels under one end and picked up the other. Turned a 180 off a slope and drove 800' to the new pad. I was dumbfounded until I saw how it worked, the Segway has a mast that makes that sickly little cylinder hooked to some parallel linkage into a big lever. Something I couldn't get the tractor to do with out making a mess of my shed and some creative rigging. The whole process took less time to move the shed than it did to unstrap the Segway off the trailer. Sometimes making a phone call and a tad of patience goes along way.
 

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Moving Shed:

When I purchased my property it came with 2 sheds and one "house" from the late 1800's adjacent to the real house I live in now. The shed used to house my tractor is a plastic POS that is too small. However, one of the sheds is a newer Tuffshed in great shape, probably 12 by 20 if I had to guess on size. I'd like to move it to the spot my plastic POS shed currently sits about 80 feet away.

Anyone here know how you move a shed of this size without causing any damage?
If you have runners under the shed try jacking up the front and placing a pipe under the runners then take your tractor and pull it almost half the length of the shed then lay another pipe under the runners at the front and pull until that pipe is almost half way of the shed then replace the first to the front. Keep repeating this until you have it where you want the shed. I prefer using 3 pipe instead of two for a little more safety. It is a little slow but it works. I have helped my dad move bins and shed up to 40 and 50 ft long the same way. (don't try pulling from the draw bar but use the pull bar under the belly, it is safer)
 

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IRQVT- Late last summer I submitted a post with some photos of a shed move on property near mine in southern Ohio. The mover jacked up one end of the shed, placed some bogie wheels under it, then used the jack to lift up the other end and wheel it about 3/4 of a mile to it's new location. I helped with my 4-wheeler when the Buffalo forklift lost traction in soft soil. I've searched my posts for this post and accompanying photos, to no avail.

Your situation sounds exactly like the one I helped with last summer; If I find the post, I'll provide detail to you.

Good luck,

Brian
http://www.greentractortalk.com/forums/off-topic/85713-you-dont-see-everyday-files.html
 

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I second the idea of using pipes or rollers... Larger diameter pressure-treated fenceposts are readily available at TSC... Moved a slightly smaller shed this summer by placing some old planks on the ground and was able to push the shed by hand... Once one rolls from the rear just move it to the front not really a big deal. Very inexpensive interviews the fencepost for other projects.
 
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