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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I need to move a couple large urns (see pic), to a new location and would appreciate your thoughts about how to best move them safely with my 1025.

I am not sure what material the urns are made from, but they are filled with dirt and they are heavy, probably 250-300 pounds each. They are not made of metal, but might be made from concrete as the urn walls are thick and have a concrete-like texture. I am assuming they will stay intact if they are picked up as I moved them a couple feet by hand with the help of another person... but I am not certain they will hold up to moving them a few hundred feet?

I am thinking I could use a strap to attach a single urn to my Ken’s bolt on shackles that are on the inside of my bucket and underneath the bolt on hooks. I would make a “basket” around a single urn by wrapping the single strap continuously around the bottom of the “bowl“ and then also around the underside of the top edge of the urn, then attach the ends of the strap to the Kens bolt on shackles located on the inside of my bucket. Not sure how much ballast I need... probably at least 400 pounds on my 60 pound rear weight hitch?

Thoughts?
 

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Don't see a pic
 
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No pic to be seen.


Borrow a furniture dolly from a friend, or buy one, with the larger pneumatic tires.

Could also pull up to the Urn with your bucket, and get under with the cutting edge of the bucket, or wobble the Urn onto the cutting edge of the bucket. Run a small ratchet strap from one end of the bucket, around the Urn and back to the other side of the bucket, sucking it up just tight enough to secure it. Easy. Put a blanket, rug, or piece of carpet, between the top of the bucket and the Urn, to protect it. Curl iot till its just off the ground, and drive off.
That idea won't work to well, if the base of the Urn is alot smaller than the upper portion.
 

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No pic to be seen.


Borrow a furniture dolly from a friend, or buy one, with the larger pneumatic tires.

Could also pull up to the Urn with your bucket, and get under with the cutting edge of the bucket, or wobble the Urn onto the cutting edge of the bucket. Run a small ratchet strap from one end of the bucket, around the Urn and back to the other side of the bucket, sucking it up just tight enough to secure it. Easy. Put a blanket, rug, or piece of carpet, between the top of the bucket and the Urn, to protect it. Curl iot till its just off the ground, and drive off.
That idea won't work to well, if the base of the Urn is alot smaller than the upper portion.


(y) (y)
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Am I correct in assuming that you have no pallet forks?
You are correct... wish I had them but I don’t. If I could figure out a good way to store pallet forks in my limited garage space, I would buy forks that do not bolt on the bucket.

Also, I’ve never used pallet forks and I wonder:
a) would pallet forks rock “open” too much to securely hold this odd shaped urn?... or rock open to the point where the forks move to the far outside of the urn “lip” and possibly break the urn?
b) would putting the entire weight of the urn on 2 relatively narrow metal rails, break what I think are concrete urns?

I’m thinking the basket idea might distribute the weight of the urn over more surface area that is also softer than metal forks... thus would reduce the risk of breaking them. However I am not certain the basket idea will hold them securely.
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
No pic to be seen.


Borrow a furniture dolly from a friend, or buy one, with the larger pneumatic tires.

Could also pull up to the Urn with your bucket, and get under with the cutting edge of the bucket, or wobble the Urn onto the cutting edge of the bucket. Run a small ratchet strap from one end of the bucket, around the Urn and back to the other side of the bucket, sucking it up just tight enough to secure it. Easy. Put a blanket, rug, or piece of carpet, between the top of the bucket and the Urn, to protect it. Curl iot till its just off the ground, and drive off.
That idea won't work to well, if the base of the Urn is alot smaller than the upper portion.
TY... I just added the pic. The base of urn is too small, I think
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
No pic to be seen.


Borrow a furniture dolly from a friend, or buy one, with the larger pneumatic tires.

Could also pull up to the Urn with your bucket, and get under with the cutting edge of the bucket, or wobble the Urn onto the cutting edge of the bucket. Run a small ratchet strap from one end of the bucket, around the Urn and back to the other side of the bucket, sucking it up just tight enough to secure it. Easy. Put a blanket, rug, or piece of carpet, between the top of the bucket and the Urn, to protect it. Curl iot till its just off the ground, and drive off.
That idea won't work to well, if the base of the Urn is alot smaller than the upper portion.
Furniture dolly... That would probably work but does not sound like as much fun as using the tractor, lol! AND, I need to show the finance committee that the tractor was a good investment!
 

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Who knows how fragile they are. What you do know, is the base can support all of the weight, as is. It would/could be risky trying to lift them from any other spot, other than under the base. The dirt left inside, will/may help it structurally in that aspect, but how much, is the unknown. Bouncing around while driving in that configuration could potentially accelerate the problem.

Pallet forks pushed together tight would get under it, then strap it to the forks for stability.


TY... I just added the pic. The base of urn is too small, I think
That depends on if the top edge of the bucket is lower than that large top edge of the Urn. Got a measuring tape? Plus, the top edge of the bucket will be set back a little bit behind the lower edge.
 

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@WCN1025
a) would pallet forks rock “open” too much to securely hold this odd shaped urn?... or rock open to the point where the forks move to the far outside of the urn “lip” and possibly break the urn?
You could wrap and chain or strap around forks and urn to keep everything tight.
b) would putting the entire weight of the urn on 2 relatively narrow metal rails, break what I think are concrete urns?
I’d pick it up with the forks narrow around the stem part. That should be plenty strong.
*Research on here before ordering pallet forks. Lots of different brands, some great some not so much. To store them they can break down to a pretty small package.
 

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Also, I’ve never used pallet forks and I wonder:
a) would pallet forks rock “open” too much to securely hold this odd shaped urn?... or rock open to the point where the forks move to the far outside of the urn “lip” and possibly break the urn?
b) would putting the entire weight of the urn on 2 relatively narrow metal rails, break what I think are concrete urns?
Sit the urn on a pallet, then move it. Or just a sheet of thick plywood. If you can't lift the urn to the pallet, make a ramp up to it and tip the urn and roll it on its bottom rim up onto the pallet. But that's a moot point you being forkless.

If the terrain permits, move them manually with a good dolly, one with pneumatic tires. Sometimes you have to think outside the tractor.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Who knows how fragile they are. What you do know, is the base can support all of the weight, as is. It would/could be risky trying to lift them from any other spot, other than under the base. The dirt left inside, will/may help it structurally in that aspect, but how much, is the unknown. Bouncing around while driving in that configuration could potentially accelerate the problem.

Pallet forks pushed together tight would get under it, then strap it to the forks for stability.




That depends on if the top edge of the bucket is lower than that large top edge of the Urn. Got a measuring tape? Plus, the top edge of the bucket will be set back a little bit behind the lower edge.
Yep... I’ll measure tomorrow after the sun comes up... but the base is kinda narrow to carry on forks, and I’d have to think about how to secure the odd shaped urn to the fork frame so it will stay stable for the trip of few hundred feet mostly over the yard that will have both up and down slopes.
 
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
@WCN1025
a) would pallet forks rock “open” too much to securely hold this odd shaped urn?... or rock open to the point where the forks move to the far outside of the urn “lip” and possibly break the urn?
You could wrap and chain or strap around forks and urn to keep everything tight.
b) would putting the entire weight of the urn on 2 relatively narrow metal rails, break what I think are concrete urns?
I’d pick it up with the forks narrow around the stem part. That should be plenty strong.
*Research on here before ordering pallet forks. Lots of different brands, some great some not so much. To store them they can break down to a pretty small package.
Great idea about wrapping the forks to ensure they don’t open up. The base is narrow compared to the rest of the urn, so putting forks under base is a great way to carry the weight, but I’d have to figure out how to secure the odd shaped urn for the trip of a few hundred feet mainly over the yard that has both up and down slopes. Thoughts? TY
 
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Sit the urn on a pallet, then move it. Or just a sheet of thick plywood. If you can't lift the urn to the pallet, make a ramp up to it and tip the urn and roll it on its bottom rim up onto the pallet. But that's a moot point you being forkless.

If the terrain permits, move them manually with a good dolly, one with pneumatic tires. Sometimes you have to think outside the tractor.
Keep talking... I might not be forkless for long! 😊
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 · (Edited)
I'm wondering who's ashes are in the Urn. :unsure:
Lol 😂
After reading your comment, I’m thinking “planter” would probably have been a better word to use.
I'm wondering who's ashes are in the Urn. :unsure:
😂😂😂
My wife and I are laughing so hard our eyes are watering!
After reading your comment, I’m thinking that ”planter” may have been a better word choice!... too late now!
 
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