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Discussion Starter #1
I got into a debate yesterday regarding the proper way to shut down an old tractor at the end of the day. I'm not going to tell whose side is whose so that your answers will be impartial.

Option 1: Turn the tractor's fuel off at the sediment bowl or other pre-carburetor shut-off point, and let the machine run the carb out of gas before switching off the ignition.

Option 2: Turn off the tractor's ignition, and then shut off the fuel at the sediment bowl or other pre-carburetor shut-off point.

Option 3: Does it really matter? Please note that this opinion was given by my wife and was dripping with sarcasm... however, in spite of her best efforts, I think it also raises a valid point.


Basically this debate boils down to leaving the carburetor full of gas for extended periods of time. What are your thoughts?
 
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I always turn the sediment bowl valve off and let my BO run out of fuel. Since it has a magneto it has no switch to turn off.
 

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I would shut it down with fuel in it. Having no fuel in it can cause the carb gaskets and rubber diaphragms to dry out or crack. I had a dual fuel truck(propane/gas) that had this issue. If I didn't run it on gas every week or so the carb gaskets dried out and fuel pump diaphram would crack.

If leaving it more than 2 months I would add some stabilizer to the fuel. I would also run only premium fuel in it so that it doesn't get exposed to ethanol, but thats a whole other topic!
 

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I'd say option 3, it doesn't really matter. That being said, I'd run it out of fuel for extended storage periods, leave it full for shorter periods of time.
 

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I would shut it down with fuel in it. Having no fuel in it can cause the carb gaskets and rubber diaphragms to dry out or crack. I had a dual fuel truck(propane/gas) that had this issue. If I didn't run it on gas every week or so the carb gaskets dried out and fuel pump diaphram would crack.

If leaving it more than 2 months I would add some stabilizer to the fuel. I would also run only premium fuel in it so that it doesn't get exposed to ethanol, but thats a whole other topic!
please elaborate. im interested:munch:
 

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The '40 B Dad had we had to shift into 4th gear (of 4 speeds) and engage the clutch at idle to stall the engine. That stupid thing would run for at least 5 minutes on the gas in the fuel lines & carb.

All the other tractors had ignition switches to shut them off, even the ones with magnetos.
 

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#2... my experience from back in the day.
 

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my dads 38 --b, we also put in 4th gear stalled the motor and then got off tractor, and then shut the gas off. we coasted it to start it all the time if possible.
 

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Back in the day?

Kill the ignition, shut off the fuel. Gas was Gas, and might varnish after 6 months, but that wasn't a huge headache to fix.

Now?
Shut off the fuel, and let it burn through everything in the carb.

Stuff changes.

The Ethanol in the Gas, is many times more destructive, than a dried out Carb gasket.
Carb gaskets nowdays don't "Dry out" like they used to either.
Ethanol eats and etches brass,steel, and pot metal.

I just had our 300 Gallon skid tank re-filled with Non Ethanol Rec. 90.
It's worth every dime to avoid Ethanol damage.
 

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back in the day?

Kill the ignition, shut off the fuel. Gas was gas, and might varnish after 6 months, but that wasn't a huge headache to fix.

Now?
Shut off the fuel, and let it burn through everything in the carb.

Stuff changes.

The ethanol in the gas, is many times more destructive, than a dried out carb gasket.
Carb gaskets nowdays don't "dry out" like they used to either.
Ethanol eats and etches brass,steel, and pot metal.

I just had our 300 gallon skid tank re-filled with non ethanol rec. 90.
It's worth every dime to avoid ethanol damage.
^^^^^^what he said!!!^^^^^^option 1
 

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I understood that you shut off the gas because most were gravity feed, with the fuel tank being above the carb.

Dad's old Ford, we shut off the fuel with the tractor running, then hit the kill switch.
 
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For the 1953 JD 40, I just switch it off, then turn the gas off under the tank. I use Seafoam & Marvel Mystery Oil in all my stored gas, which is 10% ethanal.
 

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one question I ask but no one know for sure. if no ethanol do you go back to adding the old stabil, or use the new enzyme treatments for ethanol gas to preserve it:think:
Used plain old Stabil last time, and PRI-G before that. I get 6-8 months out of 300 Gallons, and have had no issues with carrying over late summer or fall purchased Rec. 90, to the following spring.

Ethanol in the bulk tanks is a headache. They sweat internally, and suspend the water, which creates a caustic reaction with steel....which leads to crud building up in the tank. It's better for the water to fall out where it can be racked off, and not suspended.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Now that 13 of you have answered, I guess by popular vote, I have been doing it wrong. I nearly always take the first option which is to let the engine suck the carb dry. I guess it is just a carry over habit from my old G; if you left fuel in the carb (or worse, didn't shut the gas off at all) the gasoline would somehow all end up in the crankcase. Fortunately my M does not do that. And now that I think about it, I don't run any of my other engines dry when I'm done with them. Funny how habits become SOP and don't change even when the situation changes and said habit is no longer technically valid. :hi: Thanks for your input!


Now, because it was brought up:
Whenever possible I run non-ethanol gasoline, which in Michigan means either 91 or 93 octane "premium recreation gasoline". Although I personally haven't read a truly scientific study one way or the other regarding the effect of e10 fuels, my own experiance has been that in my tractor there is a noticible increase in gallons/hp-hour and in my trucks I have seen a decrease in miles/gallon. Further, about the same time e10 became mandatory for regular gas in Michigan, I began having major problems with the natural rubber components in the fuel systems of my older machines. The expensive and time consuming solution was to replace all fuel lines and in some cases the fuel pumps and carbs on my equipment because the rubber was disintegrating. One old machine needing an overhaul is normal. Two machines with the same problem at the same time is an unlikely pain in the butt. When a farm tractor, a garden tractor, a speedboat, an outboard, a pickup truck, a one-ton dump truck, and a pair of motorcycles all go down with the exact same problem and all within a month or two of each other then either there is a common condition or the universe hates me. The only connection that I could make was the fuel even though it did not all come from the same pump.

Now I just have to hope I didn't hijack my own thread! :munch:
 

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I shut the fuel at the 3-way and sediment bowl, run till it stops and drain the carb. I have had less problems this way.
 

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How do you know if gas is truely ethanol free or not? Here, they do not disclose it at every station and when you ask, they usually say I don't know, I don't think it does.:banghead:
 

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How do you know if gas is truely ethanol free or not? Here, they do not disclose it at every station and when you ask, they usually say I don't know, I don't think it does.:banghead:
Always assume that it does. Ethanol free gasoline usually costs more. Around here I pay about $.50-.80 more per gallon for ethanol free.
 

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Always assume that it does. Ethanol free gasoline usually costs more. Around here I pay about $.50-.80 more per gallon for ethanol free.
I wouldn't mind paying more for ethanol free if I knew for a fact that it is. The 93 octane at some stations here is about $.80 more per gal. Maybe it's ethanol free.
 
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