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So I have done some Google searching but really just wanted some opinions. My situation is that I need a tri-axle load of #73 stone (20-22 tons) and about 6 tons of rip rap delivered to my home I am building. Right now contractors are going in and out daily so I cannot block the drive (10ft wide) and I am a quarter mile back off the road so road dumping is not really an option. The rip-rap will only be there a few days but the #73 limestone will likely be there until spring and I will be using it throughout the winter for continual build up of my driveway and other projects. The whole construction site is dirt and with the horrible weather we have had its pretty much constantly mud.

So to solve this problem I was thinking of buying a heavy duty tarp (20ft x 30ft) and just putting it right off the edge of the driveway and having the stone delivered right on top of it. I do not know if this tarp will be big enough or if it will even hold up to my 1023e driving on it to scoop up stone. My other thought was to just have the stone dumped right on the dirt but I really don't want to be picking up stones in my yard for the rest of my life.

Any thoughts or suggestions on what to do?
 

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You don’t have a place off to the side, like if your were going to make a turn-around. What material is left could be your turn-around. This is what I did when I built my cabin. Dumped rip rap in one spot which ended up being additional parking and limestone pile went where a shed ended up. Just a thought I would think a tarp would be a pia. Plywood might work better.
 

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You don’t have a place off to the side, like if your were going to make a turn-around. What material is left could be your turn-around. This is what I did when I built my cabin. Dumped rip rap in one spot which ended up being additional parking and limestone pile went where a shed ended up. Just a thought I would think a tarp would be a pia. Plywood might work better.
That's what I was thinking.

I also thought about some of those 5' x 10', 1" thick steel plates that they put over the road to allow traffic to drive over a trench. That would be great, but I just checked our local construction equipment rental places and they're $80 / DAY!! Yikes!!
 

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The 20'X30' tarp should be big enough to hold the load of stone if it's dumped carefully, but I won't guess how it will hold up to the 1023 running over it repeatedly. You could scrape away the topsoil 6" or more deep, prior to placing the tarp and any stone that finds it's way through could be left in the excavation and covered over when the pile is gone.

Congratulations on the new house!
 

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So I have done some Google searching but really just wanted some opinions. My situation is that I need a tri-axle load of #73 stone (20-22 tons) and about 6 tons of rip rap delivered to my home I am building. Right now contractors are going in and out daily so I cannot block the drive (10ft wide) and I am a quarter mile back off the road so road dumping is not really an option. The rip-rap will only be there a few days but the #73 limestone will likely be there until spring and I will be using it throughout the winter for continual build up of my driveway and other projects. The whole construction site is dirt and with the horrible weather we have had its pretty much constantly mud.

So to solve this problem I was thinking of buying a heavy duty tarp (20ft x 30ft) and just putting it right off the edge of the driveway and having the stone delivered right on top of it. I do not know if this tarp will be big enough or if it will even hold up to my 1023e driving on it to scoop up stone. My other thought was to just have the stone dumped right on the dirt but I really don't want to be picking up stones in my yard for the rest of my life.

Any thoughts or suggestions on what to do?
I Get Large dumpsters all the time and I Put thin sheets of Plywood down for them. But Have used Plywood for Gravel before Because at least you can scoop the gravel off and Not Have Pieces with the Gravel Like you would for a Tarp :bigthumb:
 

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If you dont put something down you will lose a LOT in the topsoil. I like the idea of clearing the area down to hardpan, but plywood after sounds like the best option. Tarp doesn't work to well. Plates would be great, except for the cost.
Bill

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You are going to end up hating the tarp. I tried that once for a small load of river stones. It worked okay for the bulk of the pile but when you get down to a few inches of material it is impossible to scrape against the tarp to get a load. You end up tearing holes in the tarp and now you have 1-2 tons of stone remaining on a torn tarp that you have no way to easily gather. You can't even pick up on the tarp to consolidate the stones because they are too heavy.

For me it was an idea that sounded good on paper but was an epic fail.
 

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The tarp will tear easily. You'll have rock everywhere. You'll also have bits of tarp everywhere. The best place to put each rock variety is someplace that it will eventually exist at the end of the project anyway. That way you don't have to move as much and the final cleanup phase simply goes away.
 

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It's dumped in a big pile next to the neighbors barn. Normally it's 2B modified. That seems to hold up best on our road. I'll get it with my 2520, and the neighbor gets it with either their JD 6430 or JD 6830. That's how it's been done for the last 10 years.
 

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I would just dump it somewhere on your construction area. You can easily fix whatever is left at the end of the project.
That’s the great thing about dirt and grass...it can always be fixed
 

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I really don’t think you’d be happy with a tarp. I understand not wanting to mow rocks for the next ten years. Your best best bet is dumping it somewhere that is going to be driveway or built on.
 

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The tarp for all the reasons above will be a pain. If you have an area that is sod it will come off of that nicely unless it is soft and you push some down. The sod layer with stones could always be used as fill somewhere else. Otherwise close to where they will be needed is also a good plan.
 

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On the ground

If you are careful about pulling rock from the pile, there will be surprisingly little left at the end. That can be raked up pretty easily.

The key is to barely skim the ground and come in from the side of the pile with the loader. If the ground is frozen, it's even better but even if it's not, a few minutes raking should clean up any stray gravel. I don't think you will like the issues related to a tarp. It's likely to rip and then you have gravel on the ground, under the tarp and some on top as well.

Treefarmer
 

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I had an old Army surplus canvas tarp that I despised for a number of reasons that I used it for pea gravel storage one year. In spite of the old-school wax crayon water proofing, it still rotted away from being in contact with the ground. At least the problem of what to do with the tarp was solved by my using it for gravel storage.

As others have said, tarps don't work well.
 

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If you dont put something down you will lose a LOT in the topsoil. I like the idea of clearing the area down to hardpan, but plywood after sounds like the best option. Tarp doesn't work to well. Plates would be great, except for the cost.
Bill

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I need to write a followup. My pile was there a number of years. Was for my first attempt at building a shed before the Twp. Gave me issues. But sitting, I lost atleast 5 inches into the soil. It was not muddy there which is why I still would advocate to clear topsoil out, so you dont lose it. Even if where the drive will be, you will get a better base off the hardpan, than top soil. I did not have the option to easily do so, as was long before I got my TLB. You have your 1023E

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Discussion Starter #17
Thank you for all the input. After mulling it over and talking to the general contractor, I am going to basically dump it on the existing driveway in front of my concrete slab and the sub contractors will just have to deal with it until I can get all the stone moved. The Rip Rap rock is being used on some culverts on my driveway that I have installed as well as a ditch bank where we had to install a field tile for the septic as required by the county drainage board. It will take me a few days to get rid of the 10 ton pile of rip rap. I cant have it dumped by the ditch bank because it is WAY TOO muddy to get a truck back there and is about 1500 ft from the house. So the only decent solution is to carry the rip rap load by load either with my tractor bucket, backhoe bucket, or if its still too wet next week a track skid steer. I have been waiting for the ground to freeze but I simply cant wait anymore. We are supposed to close in 3 weeks and the septic work needs to be inspected in the next two weeks.

The #73 stone is being used to continue to build up the driveway and I am using my tractor as well a backhoe to fill in the low spots. I have already had about 30 22ton loads spread and I usually have the trucks just feather it. I will probably still have them do that for a few loads as there are some obvious low spots. I am wanting a pile of the #73 stone as there are other areas that still need built up and I really cant tell where they are until we get a heavy rain and the water will start to cover the drive. I will like to have the stone on hand to correct the issue right away. I will also be cutting a small ditch on the side of the driveway that will take care of a lot of the water issue as well, but will most likely not get to it until spring.

In addition I am going to start building my drive for the pole building that is going up next spring/summer and would like to go ahead and have the stone ready while the contractors are there. I will just pile it up on on the other side of the concrete in the picture shown (opposite from the dumpster) but the concrete is pretty fresh and do not feel comfortable with the tri-axle driving on it. So I am going to move it bucket load at a time.
 

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Everything lookin' pretty good too!:thumbup1gif:
 

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Free MDF sheets

Over here in Australia we arw very keen on going solar so 1000s of long pallets of solar panels xome into the country every day.
There are solar installers almost on every corner and they all have this same problem.
What to do with all these pallets. So they give them away for free. They are various sizes from 3x6ft to 6x12ft pine and mdf.
The mdf doesnt last forever naturally, but is great for lining anything from the ground to the concrete floor or putting over something stored. Or even building kids cubby houses from it.
So my point is if you have a solar installer nearby, ask them for several sheets off old pallets or just take the whole pallets, as many as you need.
When you are finished with the gravel the sheets will be cactus also but they can have a final life.
Take them towhere the soil needs improvement and spread them out and leave them in the sun to dry.
Then drive all over them to break them up and plow them into the soil. Chinese elcheapo mdf has very little glue and its usually a type of natural pva glue whi breaks down very fast in weather.
 
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