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Hi All,

Does anyone know how well these work vs. core aeration plugger? This is a John Deere and was supposedly made in the late 60's early seventies. What would be a reasonable price for this item in good condition?
 
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Not sure that's an aerator

Hi All,

Does anyone know how well these work vs. core aeration plugger? This is a John Deere and was supposedly made in the late 60's early seventies. What would be a reasonable price for this item in good condition?
That looks more like a tillage tool we used to run for cultivating. It worked well in soft ground that had been plowed, disked and planted but I doubt it will penetrate sod well.

Treefarmer
 

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I think that is a rotary hoe, not an areator.
That's exactly what it is, a rotary hoe. It was used to kill weeds in new corn fields prior to cultivating . I spent many hours pulling a set of six gang sections behind a 'G' john Deere as a kid in the early 60's. This was a great weed killer when the corn was to short to use a cultivator effectively.
 

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That's exactly what it is, a rotary hoe. It was used to kill weeds in new corn fields prior to cultivating . I spent many hours pulling a set of six gang sections behind a 'G' john Deere as a kid in the early 60's. This was a great weed killer when the corn was to short to use a cultivator effectively.
how did u keep the hoe in between the corn rows, without grinding up a lot of corn that was just starting to shoot up. I run a ole "B" cultivating and damn I had some trouble keeping it from tearing corn out, if I did knock a couple over, always stopped and reset them, seemed to work back then, always worried them was gonna die off and get caught-u know for tearing them out. aw-yeah worked for the neighbor and he had a Alis Chalmers -guess what I got to do for him:dunno: cultivate too .
 
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My grandfather would send my brother and I out to the field with a garden hoe to uncover what he covered up. Removing weeds with a rotary hoe works better the faster you go. I ran ours a couple times, looked exactly like the one pictured but was red, don't remember the brand


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Like said the implement in the first post picture is made from available parts of that time.. Rotary clod breaker usually behind a chisel or other field digger..

When I ran machine shop for a turf care equipment manufacturer, the thinking was core aeration was best option.. Replace able spoons is a plus.. Easier to penetrate the ground.. Not as much equipment weight needed to make it work.. I find out now they even make a machine to sweep up the plugs, shred them and broad cast them back over the turf..

In the group of implement pictures shown, my choice would be the 3pt one with 3 short barrels of core spoons.. Easy to use without any or much extra weight.. Segmented drum will turn corners, into and out of tight corners easier etc.. But then I can't use one at all on this rock pile..

Good luck..
 

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That is, in fact, a rotary hoe. It was very popular many years ago to knock out the weeds in a corn field, before the advent of chemical spray. Big Jim 55, you did not keep it between the rows. You just ran it over the crop, just keep the tractor tires between the rows. I had one of these for the purpose of aerating, but traded it back to the same guy last year for an 8ft rock rake after moving up to a bigger tractor. My yard now will never be good enough to waste the time on aerating. Plus there is too many acres. This works great as an aerator, but the faster you go, the better it will work, so keep that in mind. What you see in the pic is just a single section of what had been several sections for a much larger area.

Dave
 
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That is, in fact, a rotary hoe. It was very popular many years ago to knock out the weeds in a corn field, before the advent of chemical spray. Big Jim 55, you did not keep it between the rows. You just ran it over the crop, just keep the tractor tires between the rows. I had one of these for the purpose of aerating, but traded it back to the same guy last year for an 8ft rock rake after moving up to a bigger tractor. My yard now will never be good enough to waste the time on aerating. Plus there is too many acres. This works great as an aerator, but the faster you go, the better it will work, so keep that in mind. What you see in the pic is just a single section of what had been several sections for a much larger area.

Dave
ddinham-thanks for reply, as I have never before, now ever seen such a implement of this nature, I guess in my mind I thought that it would kinda shred the smaller corn stalks as u went along, but corn is like nothing else, a couple times when I was gardening, and had a bad wind storm come along and lay the corn over bad, then take and pound some small posts in the ground at end of rows, take baler twine and lift them stacks back up some, when the sun would come out, they would straighten back up pretty good, then just rehoe ground up around them better.
 

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We use a rotary hoe for one purpose only. When the soil crusts over recently planted soybeans due to heavy pounding rain, the soybeans do not have the strength to penetrate the crust. So, we use (driving very fast) to break up the crust. Sometimes it works great.
Usually, it is just a last ditch effort to avoid replanting.

I would not run a rotary hoe on my yard.
 

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We use a rotary hoe for one purpose only. When the soil crusts over recently planted soybeans due to heavy pounding rain, the soybeans do not have the strength to penetrate the crust. So, we use (driving very fast) to break up the crust. Sometimes it works great.
Usually, it is just a last ditch effort to avoid replanting.

I would not run a rotary hoe on my yard.
That is exactly how we used it,,, and some weed killing occurred,,,

We pulled it over the beans with a cab-over Jeep pickup,,,
I think the Jeep used as much oil as gas pulling the hoe,,, :flag_of_truce:

The Jeep hardly used any oil during "normal" use,,,

BUT,, it sure was a nicer ride than the 630 JD gas,,,, :laugh:
 

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how did u keep the hoe in between the corn rows, without grinding up a lot of corn that was just starting to shoot up. I run a ole "B" cultivating and damn I had some trouble keeping it from tearing corn out, if I did knock a couple over, always stopped and reset them, seemed to work back then, always worried them was gonna die off and get caught-u know for tearing them out. aw-yeah worked for the neighbor and he had a Alis Chalmers -guess what I got to do for him:dunno: cultivate too .
Big Jim,
If you notice the curve of the teeth the way it's mounted to the three point would not work for corn that is just out of the ground. It had to be pulled the opposite direction so the teeth didn't pop the corn out. Our rotary hoe was attached to a hydraulic lift up carrier and we would hook the gangs on forward or backward depending on the situation we were dealing with

Dave
 
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Big Jim,
If you notice the curve of the teeth the way it's mounted to the three point would not work for corn that is just out of the ground. It had to be pulled the opposite direction so the teeth didn't pop the corn out. Our rotary hoe was attached to a hydraulic lift up carrier and we would hook the gangs on forward or backward depending on the situation we were dealing with

Dave
thanks again-Daveb-very good info about this type of implement-thanks.
 
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