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12' across, 7' high, 1' thick, and I think they added rocks as they built it.

It's on the same side as the bank that went to the second floor. I plan to push the bank across where the barn used to stand. I think about 1/2 of the silo base will be exposed.

No sledge hammering for me, so that option is OUT :laugh:
 

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How about renting a skid steer with a rock hammer attachment?
 

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Electric jackhammer rents for about $75 a day. Guessing it would take maybe 2-3 hrs.
 

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Think tension

If it isn't reinforced, you can get it by thinking tension or pulling out on the concrete starting with the window cut out. If it is reinforced, the skid steer and jack hammer may be the ticket. Just remember that concrete is enormously strong in compression but weak in tension so pull toward an unsupported area by digging the soil out on the exterior. It will take a while but it's possible. If you have a hammer drill you can help a lot by drilling some holes in a line for each break point. They break up very large chunks of granite and marble by drilling holes or making saw cuts and driving in wedges.

If it's full of steel, get a bigger machine with a hammer or a track hoe.

Treefarmer
 

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C4 :bigthumb:
 

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Another vote for the skid steer and jack hammer attachment. I've seen track hoes with the same attachment but not sure if anybody would rent one. Might be a hire out for that big of a rig. The C4 idea would be fun though


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I'm with Treefarmer. Excavate around the base and push or pull outward, away from the center. The pictures don't show signs of cracks in the concrete so you're going to have to help it with something.

If it were me, I'd get a hammer drill due to the thickness and being able to control whai I was doing. I would spend some time putting holes the full height in an area two foot wide. Then taking the excavator I rented to remove the dirt, and I would pull the concrete apart where I put the holes. Once the circle is broken, its strength is greatly diminished, the rest will come down quickly. - assuming it's not reinforced.

Please be careful once you start the demolition and think twice about getting inside. That's heavy stuff if it falls on you.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
If it isn't reinforced, you can get it by thinking tension or pulling out on the concrete starting with the window cut out. If it is reinforced, the skid steer and jack hammer may be the ticket. Just remember that concrete is enormously strong in compression but weak in tension so pull toward an unsupported area by digging the soil out on the exterior. It will take a while but it's possible. If you have a hammer drill you can help a lot by drilling some holes in a line for each break point. They break up very large chunks of granite and marble by drilling holes or making saw cuts and driving in wedges.

If it's full of steel, get a bigger machine with a hammer or a track hoe.

Treefarmer
Digging around it first is not a problem. That dirt needs to be moved anyway. I doubt there is any steel reinforcement. The only "footing" for the barn I found was NOT to current code for frost depth. It was at the south east corner, the only corner that did not have any dirt on at least one wall of the corner. They dug down 1 to 1 1/2 foot threw in big rocks and then poured about a 12" cap in 1/2 in and 1/2 out the ground. It was "L" shaped about 3' x 5'. It broke as the 6415 pulled it out. The rocks in the concrete of the silo might actually help it break easier?

I do have a hammer drill, but would have to run it off a generator.

I do have a piece of 4x4 square tubing I could put through the opening and yank with a chain

C4 :bigthumb:
Fresh out :flag_of_truce:
 

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If you dig down and expose a section of it and use an electric jack hammer and break a section out, you should be ale to use the backhoe to break the rest of it down or out, A circle is only as strong as it is when whole and complete. Without rebar or metal re-enforcement it should crumble pretty easily. Are you going to implode the top half into the bottom half and back fill over it? You may want to get some fines or sand and a plate compacter to have it settle and fill all the nooks and crannies so you don't find yourself coming back with backfill as rain settles things.
 

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Digging around it first is not a problem. That dirt needs to be moved anyway. I doubt there is any steel reinforcement. The only "footing" for the barn I found was NOT to current code for frost depth. It was at the south east corner, the only corner that did not have any dirt on at least one wall of the corner. They dug down 1 to 1 1/2 foot threw in big rocks and then poured about a 12" cap in 1/2 in and 1/2 out the ground. It was "L" shaped about 3' x 5'. It broke as the 6415 pulled it out. The rocks in the concrete of the silo might actually help it break easier?

I do have a hammer drill, but would have to run it off a generator.

I do have a piece of 4x4 square tubing I could put through the opening and yank with a chain
Can you break it after the holes are drilled by pulling or pushing towards the center?
 

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I get that you want it removed but would filling it in and then covering it be an option?
 

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Since I can't add any more to the good information already given, I'd say rethink your plans and use this as a start for a coy pond.:lolol:
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Can you break it after the holes are drilled by pulling or pushing towards the center?
I am thinking it would be the strongest at withstand an inward force.

I get that you want it removed but would filling it in and then covering it be an option?
The bank side was about 7' higher than the ground floor of the barn. The silo base was even with the ground level of the top of the bank. The bank went almost the full length of the barn. It was 56'on the long (bank side) x 30' . In order to make this area "brush hogable" I think the bank needs to come down 3' to4'. So at least that much of the silo base needs to be broken up.

If I were to fill it, I would need to bring in more dirt to blend the bank across. A LOT of dirt.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Is this something a small dozer could break up easily. I've never used a dozer, so I am unsure of their capabilities. It might be worth paying for 1/2 a day for a dozer/operator to break it up and spread the bank out.

My area they get about $100/hour, usually 4 hour minimum.
 

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Yes. A small dozer would handle that just fine. :good2: A Cat D6 or JD 650 size would be perfect and get it done quick.

 

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How about dynamite!! :thumbup1gif: It would be quick!! Just kidding!!!
I don't think I have anything realistic to add to all the posts already. Many of these suggestions will work, it is a matter of how much time you have and how much physical labor your want to do.
 

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Is this something a small dozer could break up easily. I've never used a dozer, so I am unsure of their capabilities. It might be worth paying for 1/2 a day for a dozer/operator to break it up and spread the bank out.

My area they get about $100/hour, usually 4 hour minimum.
I'd think they could easily accomplished that amount of work in a 4 hour period.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I started digging around it today. Anything I can do is less I have to pay to have done. I have a lot of time, but not a lot of :gizmo:

I am guessing I have dug down about 1/2 the height of it. Sandy and digs easy EXCEPT for the rocks they filled the bank with. It looks like they meant for the top foot to be above grade at one time.

The shovel you see in one picture was fro close work, it did not get much use. Or for Gizmo2 to lean on if he showed up.

I have not tried to break it yet. Maybe I could suspend a big rock from my boom pole and use it as a battering ram. Too bad I sold the 2030's tire chains they would have made a good rock basket.

It look like the area below the precast opening might have been poured after the base was made? That might be the week spot? :dunno:
 

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Official "Groovie" Dude
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That looks like the old field stone silos of old. Back then it was difficult to get concrete trucked in so most was done with mixers on site and field stone was used to cut down the amount of concrete needed. The inside is usually lined or skim coated to allow the silage to fall easier. The window you see was a silage door that as it settled a lower one was opened so you could throw the silage out the door, down the chute to a feed cart. My sister still has one standing on her farm.
 

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Discussion Starter #20 (Edited)
That looks like the old field stone silos of old. Back then it was difficult to get concrete trucked in so most was done with mixers on site and field stone was used to cut down the amount of concrete needed. The inside is usually lined or skim coated to allow the silage to fall easier. The window you see was a silage door that as it settled a lower one was opened so you could throw the silage out the door, down the chute to a feed cart. My sister still has one standing on her farm.
It had 7 or 8 courses of concrete tiles. There was a steel rod that wrapped around where each course stopped and the next started. Each course had the silage door opening. The roof and doors were long gone.

Last year I took the tiles down. There was a starter course, maybe 6" tall that looked like it was had mortared to the base. It easily broke off when I took the courses down.

Each course was about 2' tall
 
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