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Morning guys, I picked up a mint condition 54” plow along with ax series dual angling quick hitch for my x758. No rust on any of the components aside from the scrapper at the base of the plow. I haven’t hooked them up to my tractor yet to test everything.

The guy that owned the setup was much older and couldn’t remember his tractor that he had it on before buying his 1 series. It has been sitting in his garage for 5-8 years his son offered to list it since he wasn’t computer savvy.

Since the hydraulic system is sealed do I have to worry about the age of the fluid sitting in it contaminating the brand new fluid that I have in my x758 which has less than 25hrs?

My first tractor with a hydraulic system and I want her to last.




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Since the hydraulic system is sealed do I have to worry about the age of the fluid sitting in it contaminating the brand new fluid that I have in my x758 which has less than 25hrs?
Actually, the hydraulic system is not sealed. As soon as you hook those hoses to your tractor whatever fluid is in the plows cylinders will mix with the fluid in your tractor. Obviously the plow was well taken care of but if it were ME (and I'm a bit anal), I would unscrew the fittings and then work the two cylinders back and forth to flush out the old oil.

Even when I bought a new rear blade that had hydraulics I had no idea what equipment the selling dealer hooked it to for a test so I flushed out everything.

After flushing out the fluid by moving the cylinders back and forth I put a bit of fresh fluid in a bucket, inserted the two open hose ends and again worked the cylinders back and forth. This flushed out everything with new fluid.

I then reattached the quick connects, attached it to my tractor, let the cylinders refill with fluid and then added as necessary to bring my sump back to full.

Anal? Yes. But why take chances for what amounts to be about 1/2 gallon of unknown fluid.
 

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I agree with above comments Flush the cylinders first. Nice outfit
 

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This is my opinion, winter is dang near over so using the plow is limited unless your planning on pushing things other than snow. I would let it sit and keep running my tractor the remainder of year until next winter arrives. I would hook my tractor up and operate the plow a bit then I would do a hydraulic service on my tractor even if it's an early service. After the service there still may be some old fluid in the system but regardless of what you do it will be hard to get all of the old fluid out. I personally wouldn't want to run it as is but I wouldn't want to put much effort into getting it out either. What little remained after a hydraulic service I would be content with just fine, but that's me.
 

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I Agree with all above.

Do not hook up that plow to your tractor without cycling the oil out of the cylinders.

Probably the easiest way to do this is:

Pick one quick connect on your tractor to use for this purge.

Connect one of the quick connects for the angle cylinder to the pre-determined quick connect on your tractor.

Remove the quick connect off the other line to the angle cylinder and put in a bucket.

Push your SCV to apply flow to the selected quick connect port. Hold the SCV to push the cylinder till it bottoms out.

Swap the hoses to the other line on the angle cylinder and do the same thing in the other direction wasting the oil out of this side of the cylinder.

I would do this two times each way.

Repeat for the lift cylinder.

Between purge cycles, refill the tractor hydraulic reservoir.
 

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I Agree with all above.

Do not hook up that plow to your tractor without cycling the oil out of the cylinders.

Probably the easiest way to do this is:

Pick one quick connect on your tractor to use for this purge.

Connect one of the quick connects for the angle cylinder to the pre-determined quick connect on your tractor.

Remove the quick connect off the other line to the angle cylinder and put in a bucket.

Push your SCV to apply flow to the selected quick connect port. Hold the SCV to push the cylinder till it bottoms out.

Swap the hoses to the other line on the angle cylinder and do the same thing in the other direction wasting the oil out of this side of the cylinder.

I would do this two times each way.

Repeat for the lift cylinder.

Between purge cycles, refill the tractor hydraulic reservoir.
This is an easy enough plan that doesn't take much effort. An excellent ideal!
 

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This is my opinion, winter is dang near over so using the plow is limited unless your planning on pushing things other than snow. I would let it sit and keep running my tractor the remainder of year until next winter arrives. I would hook my tractor up and operate the plow a bit then I would do a hydraulic service on my tractor even if it's an early service. After the service there still may be some old fluid in the system but regardless of what you do it will be hard to get all of the old fluid out. I personally wouldn't want to run it as is but I wouldn't want to put much effort into getting it out either. What little remained after a hydraulic service I be content with just fine.
Personally, I wouldn't recommend taking the chance of pushing oil that you have no idea what it is into my tractor.

Once you push unknown oil into your tractor reservoir, you may have just contaminated your hydraulic system in your tractor. Changing the hydraulic oil immediately after you cycle the oil into your tractor will not remove all of the potential contamination.

It is really incorrect thinking to think that all of the hydraulic oil is drained from a system when draining the reservoir.

After a hydraulic system is contaminated, it is too late to change the oil. The contaminated oil has already been pumped into your tractors propel circuits.

I personally wouldn't do it. I would waste the oil in the lift and angle cylinders so I know the oil in them is good.
 

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Personally, I wouldn't recommend taking the chance of pushing oil that you have no idea what it is into my tractor.

Once you push unknown oil into your tractor reservoir, you may have just contaminated your hydraulic system in your tractor. Changing the hydraulic oil immediately after you cycle the oil into your tractor will not remove all of the potential contamination.

It is really incorrect thinking to think that all of the hydraulic oil is drained from a system when draining the reservoir.

After a hydraulic system is contaminated, it is too late to change the oil. The contaminated oil has already been pumped into your tractors propel circuits.

I personally wouldn't do it. I would waste the oil in the lift and angle cylinders so I know the oil in them is good.
Sir, I never said draining the fluid would get all the old fluid out. I realize that, I'm just saying that's what I would do because putting a lot of effort into it isn't worth it to me. I would do something to hopefully help and wouldn't leave it as is, I just stated what I would do and have done. Perhaps we've always been lucky with our purchasing of used equipment over the years? Your ideal is easy enough and certainly the way I would go about it if I was the op. Sitting with two hoses in a bucket working cylinders by hand however...... Nope, not for me.

Buying some hunk of junk from an auction, totally different scenario. Buying something from an individual where I can see his equipment, home/shop, and the equipment looking as good as what the op purchased is another scenario, I would risk it. I would purchase something from 99% of the folks on this site and never once give it a seconds thought about running it on my tractor with minimum effort/worry about it.
 

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Sir, I never said draining the fluid would get all the old fluid out. I realize that, I'm just saying that's what I would do because putting a lot of effort into it isn't worth it to me. I would do something to hopefully help and wouldn't leave it as is, I just stated what I would do and have done. Perhaps we've always been lucky with our purchasing of used equipment over the years? Your ideal is easy enough and certainly the way I would go about it if I was the op. Sitting with two hoses in a bucket working cylinders by hand however...... Nope, not for me.

Buying some hunk of junk from an auction, totally different scenario. Buying something from an individual where I can see his equipment, home/shop, and the equipment looking as good as what the op purchased is another scenario, I would risk it. I would purchase something from 99% of the folks on this site and never once give it a seconds thought on running it on my tractor with minimum effort/worry about it.
All good!!! Thank you!!! :good2:
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks a lot for the recommendations guys. Winter is nearly over and I have no intention of using the blade for snow. I wouldn't mind testing the blade with some topsoil I will be moving around in the backyard in the next few weeks. I initially purchased this setup because I wanted the QH in order to mount a front mount dethatcher while maintaining hydraulic lift control. There's a guy on eBay that is know on the mytractorforum that sells these brackets that bolt onto the dethatch and have the backing that is on a plow.

I will end up pulling off the hoses and clearing the cylinders by hand of any residual hydraulic fluid that's in them to prevent contamination to the balance of my system. I can't trust the age of this equipment but based upon the condition of it it's hard to believe its as old as I was told. As y'all were responding and I was reading I forgot I bought a used QH last summer and hooked it up and moved it around without even considering the fluid that was in the cylinders at that time. Granted that one was only a few years old but none the less I risked my system them like an idiot. Damn it!
 

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Meh.. there are enough examples of people that buy stuff and just hook it up with no issues. I have never though of draining an attachment. It's a small amount of fluid.

You think farmers do this when they buy equipment?
 

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Meh.. It's a small amount of fluid.

You think farmers do this when they buy equipment?
We never did UNLESS it was obviously questionable.

Also, when using equipment supplied by the co-op and seed/fertilizer sources did farmers drain all of the hydraulics before using them on their tractors......no way.
 

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We never did UNLESS it was obviously questionable.

Also, when using equipment supplied by the co-op and seed/fertilizer sources did farmers drain all of the hydraulics before using them on their tractors......no way.
It is an obvious conundrum which is what makes sharing hydraulic implements somewhat risky. I'm no expert but it seems like years ago a lot of tractors had hydraulic systems that used similar fluid. They were almost all gear driven with hydrostatic transmissions few and far between. Anything slippery with a viscosity that was close was probably going to work fine. So the most you had to worry about was whether or not the fluid was contaminated with water - and even that wasn't a show stopper.

Fast forward to the era of specialized applications where everything takes a different kind of fluid. That combined with computer controlled hydro transmissions makes mixing fluid types and contamination a bit of a crap shoot.

I would be interesting in hearing what modern farmers with newer equipment do in these situations.
 

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You think farmers do this when they buy equipment?
I'm not sure that is a good argument. :) Not to offend any farmers who read this but have you ever heard of or witnessed "farmer engineering"? Historically they never had a good reputation for worrying about the little things. The goal was to back get up and running as quickly as possible and back out to the field - with judicious use of binder twine and coat hanger wire whenever possible. :)
 

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I'm not sure that is a good argument. :) Not to offend any farmers who read this but have you ever heard of or witnessed "farmer engineering"? Historically they never had a good reputation for worrying about the little things. The goal was to back get up and running as quickly as possible and back out to the field - with judicious use of binder twine and coat hanger wire whenever possible. :)
We never used binder twine and coat hangers, our stuff was fixed right and that's how it lasted for over 30 years. But in general, no we didn't have the time to treat equipment in ways a lot of folks who has nothing but time on their hands and working in their yards with equipment does.
 

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It is an obvious conundrum which is what makes sharing hydraulic implements somewhat risky. I'm no expert but it seems like years ago a lot of tractors had hydraulic systems that used similar fluid. They were almost all gear driven with hydrostatic transmissions few and far between. Anything slippery with a viscosity that was close was probably going to work fine. So the most you had to worry about was whether or not the fluid was contaminated with water - and even that wasn't a show stopper.

Fast forward to the era of specialized applications where everything takes a different kind of fluid. That combined with computer controlled hydro transmissions makes mixing fluid types and contamination a bit of a crap shoot.

I would be interesting in hearing what modern farmers with newer equipment do in these situations.
I don't disagree with any of this at all. All you said is extremely valid
 

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We never used binder twine and coat hangers, our stuff was fixed right and that's how it lasted for over 30 years. But in general, no we didn't have the time to treat equipment in ways a lot of folks who has nothing but time on their hands and working in their yards with equipment does.
You are very correct. It is funny some times. Farm equipment will sometimes sit out in the field or wherever it was last used for DECADES yet someone will come along and buy it at an auction only to rush home quick and get it in the garage before it rains.

It does seem to be the "enthusiast" owner who will obsess over the slightest dented fender or rusty bolt and I'll admit I am one of them. :) I'm clearly in the "use it but don't abuse it" category.

My uncle was a farmer way back when... he had an old IH row crop and a couple Ford 8Ns. He fixed EVERYTHING with binder twine and coat hangers. He also used a crescent wrench or channel locks for everything. He kept those old tractors running for a lot of decades but the next owners sure had their work cut out for them. :)
 

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Just as a point of reference. Most modern large at tractors route SCV return through the hydraulic filter. They do this to prevent cross contamination of debris. Most CUT & L&G equipment do not because of back pressure.

If it were me I wouldn't worry a about it as long as the hose fittings are tight. Where do you expect contamination to come from? Past the seals on the cylinders from the outside or are you worried that the filtered oil from the previous tractors was contaminated? Both scenarios are unlikely. I would be more concerned that the fluid was incompatible. But since it's a JD attachment that only fits a JD tractor, it's highly unlikely that they were not using JD oil.

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Just as a point of reference. Most modern large at tractors route SCV return through the hydraulic filter. They do this to prevent cross contamination of debris. Most CUT & L&G equipment do not because of back pressure.

If it were me I wouldn't worry a about it as long as the hose fittings are tight. Where do you expect contamination to come from? Past the seals on the cylinders from the outside or are you worried that the filtered oil from the previous tractors was contaminated? Both scenarios are unlikely. I would be more concerned that the fluid was incompatible. But since it's a JD attachment that only fits a JD tractor, it's highly unlikely that they were not using JD oil.

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I guess both? The cylinders looked clean so that likely isn't a concern. I am more worried about the fluid that was in circulation within his system on his tractor could have been contaminated. Maybe he had an oops and had to drain and refill his system, which still won't remove 100%. Maybe he didn't clean the fill point and got debris in the system that has circulated around the balance of the system.
 

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Meh.. there are enough examples of people that buy stuff and just hook it up with no issues. I have never though of draining an attachment. It's a small amount of fluid.

You think farmers do this when they buy equipment?
Honestly I'm not sure how farmers did it over the last 5, 15, 35 years. As systems became more high tech with additional sensors they couldn't risk contamination. Different fluids and manufacturers had different fluid requirements that might not be the same for A vs B and thus they wouldn't want to mix?

I've never had a tractor with a hydraulic system before, it's always been motor oil only. I grew up in the 90s using the craftsman tractors with 6 gears and a brake pedal/ clutch function. I'm just trying to get years and years out of my equipment that I spent good money on. I bought the x758 because I like to buy it right the first time so I only have to buy it once.
 
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