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This afternoon was using our old Craftsman 2000 pressure washer. While cleaning our concrete porch and sidewalks the nozzle of the washer hit my ankle and left a pretty good mark. I was talking to my neighbor and he noticed the bruise on my ankle.
He is a manager for a PA company doing hydro seeding and guide rails.
Anyway he told of a safety memo the other day.

Seems a truck driver , not sure what type truck or eqpt mounted on truck, but the driver noticed he had a hyd leak but could not see where it may be.
So he runs his hand up under the cab or side of truck. He felt something hitting the palm of his hand, pulled his hand back and noticed a small pin hole in his hand. Later that night he went to the ER because his hand was swelling and hurting really bad.

Doctors had to remove part of his hand because the hyd fluid had gotten into his blood stream.


I know this has been mentioned before but just a reminder to be aware of any pressure lines.
 

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A piece of cardboard is what I use.Air is dangerous too.
 

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This afternoon was using our old Craftsman 2000 pressure washer. While cleaning our concrete porch and sidewalks the nozzle of the washer hit my ankle and left a pretty good mark. I was talking to my neighbor and he noticed the bruise on my ankle.
He is a manager for a PA company doing hydro seeding and guide rails.
Anyway he told of a safety memo the other day.

Seems a truck driver , not sure what type truck or eqpt mounted on truck, but the driver noticed he had a hyd leak but could not see where it may be.
So he runs his hand up under the cab or side of truck. He felt something hitting the palm of his hand, pulled his hand back and noticed a small pin hole in his hand. Later that night he went to the ER because his hand was swelling and hurting really bad.

Doctors had to remove part of his hand because the hyd fluid had gotten into his blood stream.


I know this has been mentioned before but just a reminder to be aware of any pressure lines.
ET.-that's too bad about that fella losing part of his hand. when i came back to the coal industry in 2004. my boss got oil under his skin-3 small places- i wanted to take him to the ER right away that day-but he refused to go--it turned a different color-kinda like a bad bruise --but after a week he was ok. first time i ever had seen oil go under ur skin. he claimed it was the new type of oil that was out now.
in the old days-u never heard of anyone getting that.
 

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What you don't see

What you don't see can definitely still hurt you. Hydraulic oil just ain't at all good when inserted into your body.

Years ago, I toured a coal power plant with a friend who was part of the construction/initial startup crew. He reminded me that if I heard a steam leak, do not move as you can't see superheated steam and it can cut steel, bodies etc. Fascinating tour as we went all over the facility during his regular inspection but the idea of getting parts cut off by something I couldn't see scared the bejesus out of me.

Treefarmer
 

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Good info! thx for posting!
 

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What you don't see can definitely still hurt you. Hydraulic oil just ain't at all good when inserted into your body.

Years ago, I toured a coal power plant with a friend who was part of the construction/initial startup crew. He reminded me that if I heard a steam leak, do not move as you can't see superheated steam and it can cut steel, bodies etc. Fascinating tour as we went all over the facility during his regular inspection but the idea of getting parts cut off by something I couldn't see scared the bejesus out of me.

Treefarmer
That is why we had wooden broomsticks in various places in the plants. You used them to detect a leak and make sure the path you intended to walk was clear. Same concept as using cardboard to detect a hydraulic leak. :good2:
 

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Worked with an old navel guy. They used wood broom handles on ships to find the steam leaks as well.

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Worked with an old navel guy. They used wood broom handles on ships to find the steam leaks as well.
600 psi steam is VERY dynamic,,,, :flag_of_truce:

My ship was built in 1944,, I was on it around 1972,,,
I stayed away from anything that looked like a steam pipe.
We were preached all the steam pipe failure stories,,,

I can't even repeat those stories,,,,

No one mentioned diesel fuel injector lines,,,
?? higher pressure than hydraulics ?? :dunno:
 

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Absolutely, diesel is just as bad. But often due to less volume there is less risk. Seen the pictures at the coal mine when they have to jagged cut you open to let it bleed out.

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600 psi steam is VERY dynamic,,,, :flag_of_truce:

My ship was built in 1944,, I was on it around 1972,,,
I stayed away from anything that looked like a steam pipe.
We were preached all the steam pipe failure stories,,,

I can't even repeat those stories,,,,

No one mentioned diesel fuel injector lines,,,
?? higher pressure than hydraulics ?? :dunno:
If I remember correctly. In the Navy 600 lbs was only considered low pressure steam. We had the unfortunate duty of cleaning the head (bathroom) every third month. When it was our turn everything was just nasty. Even though the whole head was just redone a short time ago. After about an hour of cleaning with an arsenal of chemicals it was going nowhere quick. Then I noticed this low pressure steam line running through the overhead (ceiling). I retrieved a wand from the boiler room. I was similar to a pressure washer gun but with a metal hose. Hooked it up to this line and went to work. That steam took everything off without any cleaner. Soap scum, graffiti, dirt and even the calcium deposits. Ran into some stubborn stains on the floor. They eventually came up along with the floor. lol

For some reason compressed air was secured (ordered not to be used). The captain happened by the head and heard us. He came inside the door screaming about his orders to secure it. By this time the whole room was like a Turkish bath. I sent some steam his way. He quickly retreated claiming oh it's steam!

The XO (2nd in command) eventually came around for his daily inspections before we were finished. As he opens the door we yelled "secured"! After getting hit with a wall of steam he also retreated.
In the end our devision was given an outstanding on compartment inspections for the whole month.
It was also pretty sweet taking a shower in a sanitized environment. We were all soaking wet by the time we finished. Everyone else that uses this head said great job and 2 thumbs up.

I think high pressure steam was like 1,500 lbs. That's the stuff that will cut you in 1/2 quick. It was mainly used for spinning a turbine connected to gear box that drove the propeller.
 

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JD is well aware of the hyd injection. At the start of every class we get briefed on it. JD actually has an emergency number to call in the event you get injected. They will direct you to a Dr that is versed in the treatment.
Years ago my Dad was working on a high pressure water pump. The discharge line fitting failed and the high pressure water struck him in the leg below the ball sack and blew out the back side of his leg. Being the tough old guy his was, he got a couple shop rags and a #3 phillips screwdriver and packed the rags in the channel from both sides. Then walked to my sisters house to get a ride to the hospital. They treated it like a gun shot wound. Went in about 50 cal size and came out soup can size. Missed his artery my mm's.

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JD is well aware of the hyd injection. At the start of every class we get briefed on it. JD actually has an emergency number to call in the event you get injected. They will direct you to a Dr that is versed in the treatment.
Years ago my Dad was working on a high pressure water pump. The discharge line fitting failed and the high pressure water struck him in the leg below the ball sack and blew out the back side of his leg. Being the tough old guy his was, he got a couple shop rags and a #3 phillips screwdriver and packed the rags in the channel from both sides. Then walked to my sisters house to get a ride to the hospital. They treated it like a gun shot wound. Went in about 50 cal size and came out soup can size. Missed his artery my mm's.

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Holy cr.......😱😱😱😱 One heck of a story, thanks for sharing that.
 

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I was very lucky a few years ago. I was running a boom arm mower on a Case tractor with a cab. The steering motor (hydraulic power steering) was on the bottom of the steering column inside the cab.

I finished a section, and was making a turn around across the road to the other side when a hydraulic line blew. I couldn't get away from it as I was straight across a 55mph road. The fluid aimed straight at my boot - then of course sprayed everywhere in the cab - I was soaked from head to toe with hot hydraulic oil by the time I got the machine safely off the road and stopped.

Of course no cell phones back then - no service around here now anyway. On a remote road like this it took a few minutes before a vehicle came along and stopped. I asked him to go up to the tavern up the road and call the shed for me. It then took my foreman another 30 minutes to get there who then took me home to get cleaned up.

I think the only thing that saved me were wearing good leather boots. That was actually a requirement - but not steel-toed boots.
 

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JD is well aware of the hyd injection. At the start of every class we get briefed on it. JD actually has an emergency number to call in the event you get injected. They will direct you to a Dr that is versed in the treatment.
Years ago my Dad was working on a high pressure water pump. The discharge line fitting failed and the high pressure water struck him in the leg below the ball sack and blew out the back side of his leg. Being the tough old guy his was, he got a couple shop rags and a #3 phillips screwdriver and packed the rags in the channel from both sides. Then walked to my sisters house to get a ride to the hospital. They treated it like a gun shot wound. Went in about 50 cal size and came out soup can size. Missed his artery my mm's.

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Not to make light of this post X I feel a little out of sorts now just picturing this accident!...... Luckily it wasn't MM's higher or he would be singing with the Vienna Boys Choir! He was a lucky man especially with the artery issue... You don't have much time if you sever the femoral artery, wrapped or not.
What scares me is new owners that do not have a clue about pressures and what can happen until it's to late.... And we all know not everyone reads their warnings in our owner manuals.... Hell, I know how this works,, famous last words....
 

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I saw a picture on here a couple years ago of a hand that had been hit with high-pressure hydraulic fluid. I can't seem to find it though...
 
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