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Hi folks, I have a 1023e, 2015 model with 200 hrs on it now, and this is my second time changing the hydraulic oil and cleaning the screen, (previous at 50 hrs). However, this time while changing all fluids and filters I realized after I was done, I forgot to install my hydraulic oil filter, absent minded I guess.
The screen was pretty clean, some minor shavings and the fluid was clean. I put in fresh hydraulic fluid and am wondering if I should just continue on working it and change the filter /fluid after maybe another 100 hrs. Any thoughts?
 

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Hydro transmissions can be a very expensive repair. Myself - I would take the time to drain the fluid into a very clean vessel and get that filter changed. Then put the fluid back in being very cautious to keep it clean.

Take care of your equipment and it will take care of you.
 

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Personally, I would rather have a new filter than new fluid. I would drain the fluid into clean containers, install a new filter and then refill with the fluid which has been strained through a paper filter. However, there are plenty of machines out there that have not had their fluids or filters changed for many hundreds of hours. It's a toss up.
 

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I'm of the opinion that changing the filter is probably more important than changing the fluid. This seems to be echoed in the maintenance schedules for some of the newer tractors which has you go 1200 hours on the fluid as long as you continue to change the filter every 400 hours.

You mentioned this is the second time changing the fluid and cleaning the screen but you didn't say if the filter was changed back at the 50 hrs service.
 

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Price of tractor vs price of new fluid and filter is a no brainer.
 

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I would take the time to drain the fluid into a very clean vessel and get that filter changed. Then put the fluid back in being very cautious to keep it clean.
Personally, I would rather have a new filter than new fluid. I would drain the fluid into clean containers, install a new filter and then refill with the fluid which has been strained through a paper filter.
These right here ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
Worst case, 4 gallons of fluid is still far cheaper than a tranny repair.
 

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I would place a clean pail or other receptacle, place it under the filter, remove the old filter, and quickly spin on the new one. Add enough oil to bring it to the proper level. If you choose to use the oil that spills out, strain it through a paint strainer.
 

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I would place a clean pail or other receptacle, place it under the filter, remove the old filter, and quickly spin on the new one. Add enough oil to bring it to the proper level. If you choose to use the oil that spills out, strain it through a paint strainer.
I agree with Don, but cover the floor area and be prepared for a mess and be positioned to do this quickly, because the filter is low enough that there is going to be a lot of fluid loss.

Handy tip. make sure the dip stick is in the hydro and close the fill location as it will slow down the fluid loss a little due to the vacuum inside the case when sealed............But I wouldn't be surprised if you end up covered in fluid, trying to do this..........

Personally, I would rather lose some money on the fluid and replace with all new, than to reuse fluid which you try to catch coming out of the machine.

And know you aren't the first to have this happen...................
 

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Do what they call a "hot swap" with a new filter. Make sure you have a decent drain pan and make sure to wear nitrol gloves anytime you're working with oil. Just replace what's lost,no big deal.
 

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I would place a clean pail or other receptacle, place it under the filter, remove the old filter, and quickly spin on the new one. Add enough oil to bring it to the proper level. If you choose to use the oil that spills out, strain it through a paint strainer.
Do you think the trick of attaching the shop vac to the fill port would further reduce the amount of fluid that escapes? I keep seeing this trick mentioned when changing hoses and hydraulic systems.
 

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First the disclaimer: I have never tried this, nor do I know if this would work for an oil filter change with vehicle full of hydraulic or engine oil. Nor do I take any responsibility if you try this.

But I found several youtube videos of people using a vacuum cleaner to draw a vacuum in the engine or fuel oil tank to change a leaking drain plug/gasket, or drain valve without removing the oil.

Here is a link to one video of a mechanic changing a leaky drain plug gasket on a car that just had an oil change.

There are other videos of a heating repair guy replacing the stuck valve on a fuel oil tank, but you have to be careful not to collapse your oil tank.

Just another idea to solve the problem. Try this at your own risk.

My 2 cents.
 

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I guess brilliant minds think alike. Jgayman and I must have been typing at the same time.
 

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Do you think the trick of attaching the shop vac to the fill port would further reduce the amount of fluid that escapes? I keep seeing this trick mentioned when changing hoses and hydraulic systems.
I'd take my chances of being quick on the filter change.
 

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Suck up your pride and go buy new fluid. Drain the fluid, install new filter, and refill with new clean fluid. Less mess and easy to do. No additional filtering, etc.
Personally I have a checklist I use when servicing my vehicles. Beforehand I assemble the parts/fluids needed and keep them with me when I do the service. And before I refill any fluids, I check the filter and drain plug(s) to make sure they are tight.
 

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Suck up your pride and go buy new fluid. Drain the fluid, install new filter, and refill with new clean fluid. Less mess and easy to do. No additional filtering, etc.
Personally I have a checklist I use when servicing my vehicles. Beforehand I assemble the parts/fluids needed and keep them with me when I do the service. And before I refill any fluids, I check the filter and drain plug(s) to make sure they are tight.
We still haven’t heard back from the OP as to whether or not the filter was changed at 50 hrs. If it was he’s only at 150 hrs on the oil and filter and could easily run that fluid/filter for another 50-100 hrs rather than wasting brand new fluid. Even with the recommended 200 hr maintenance interval, the transmission is not going to immediately self destruct if you go past 200 hrs.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I'm of the opinion that changing the filter is probably more important than changing the fluid. This seems to be echoed in the maintenance schedules for some of the newer tractors which has you go 1200 hours on the fluid as long as you continue to change the filter every 400 hours.

You mentioned this is the second time changing the fluid and cleaning the screen but you didn't say if the filter was changed back at the 50 hrs service.
Yes the filter was changed at 50 hours.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I agree, transmissions are expensive to repair, since there is only 150 hrs on the old filter, I’ll change it this fall with fresh fluid, should be around 200 hrs on it by then . Hard to believe I spent the night before going over everything including both fuel filters, air filter, oil filter and hydraulic filter. Then finish up happy and proud until I notice the hydraulic filter still in the box.
 

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I agree, transmissions are expensive to repair, since there is only 150 hrs on the old filter, I’ll change it this fall with fresh fluid, should be around 200 hrs on it by then . Hard to believe I spent the night before going over everything including both fuel filters, air filter, oil filter and hydraulic filter. Then finish up happy and proud until I notice the hydraulic filter still in the box.
That sounds like a good plan. You'll be fine.
 

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Do what they call a "hot swap" with a new filter. Make sure you have a decent drain pan and make sure to wear nitrol gloves anytime you're working with oil. Just replace what's lost,no big deal.
I have done a "Hot Swap" when I installed the hydraulic system heater on my 955, which is actually located below the filter. You have to make sure that you seal up the vent, have a decent seal with a clean rag around the shop vac nozzle. Obviously, this is a two person job, but fairly simple and easy.

I had seen this done when I had to have a damaged fitting on a 150 gallon truck fuel tank which was about 3/4 full. I was skeptical, but after having seen it done, with no loss of fuel, I became a believer.

Dave
 
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